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C 57.121: R 92/996 




Prepared by: 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Bureau of Export Administration 



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The author wishes to acknowledge the contributions of many individuals, agencies and companies to the 
Directory. The author especially wishes to acknowledge the contributions of Robert May, Dale Slaght, Rich 
Steffens and Karen Zens of the U.S. & Foreign Commercial Service in Russia and Don Stanton of the Bureau 
of Export Administration for their contributions. 



Additional copies of this document*, as well as future installments, may be obtained 
for a nominal fee from: 

National Technical Information Service 

5285 Port Royal Road 

Springfield, VA 22161 

Phone: (703) 487-4650, Fax: (703) 321 8547, Telex: 64617 COMNTIS. 

E-mail: orders@ntis.fedworld.gov, Internet: http:Wwww.ntis.gov 

Order by Publication Number(s): 

Fifth installment (paper copy): PB96-100177 

Copies of the Directory are also available from the: 

Department of Commerce Economic Bulletin Board (EBB): 

The Directory highlights and enterprise profiles are available in electronic format 
through the Department of Commerce's Economic Bulletin Board (EBB). Located 
under "Defense Conversion Subcommittee Information for Russia and the NIS" 
(Area 20 on the EBB). For more information regarding access or use, call EBB 
Info/Help line at (202) 4824986 . 

National Trade Data Bank: 

A CD-ROM version of the cumulative version is available in the current edition of 
the National Trade Data Bank (NTDB) at a cost of $59.00 or annual subscription of 
$575.00. NTDB's phone number is (202) 482-1986, e-mail: stat-usa@doc.gov. 
Internet: httpWwww.stat-usa.gov 



Points of contact for changes and updates to information in the Directory: 

Franklin J. Carvalho, Editor 
Room H- 1089 

Bureau of Export Administration 
U.S. Department of Commerce, 
Washington, DC 20230 
Phone: (202)482-0672 
Fax: (202)482-3195 
Internet: fcarvalh@bxa.doc.gov 

This work sponsored by the Defense Nuclear Agency under DNA IACRO#94-7620 and Work Unit 
CPB 



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UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
The Deputy Under Secretary for 

Export Administration 
Washington, DC 20230 



Pennsylvania State Un:ver: 7 
Libraries 

July 31, 1996 MAY 5 1997 

Documents Collection 
U.S. Depository Copy 

The publication of this fifth installment of the Russian Defense Business 
Directory , focusing on St. Petersburg and the neighboring Leningrad Oblast, 
underscores the continued commitment of the U.S. Department of Commerce to 
working with Russian industry in making a successful transition to profitable 
civilian endeavors, and it highlights the critical role of private trade and 
investment in helping Russian defense enterprises shift to commercial ventures. 

The Department of Commerce works actively to remove unnecessary 
obstacles to trade and investment, foster commercial cooperation, and facilitate 
American involvement in this region. 

Since the publication of the fourth installment of the Directory, we have 
continued our efforts to alert U.S. industry to opportunities in Russian defense 
conversion. For example, the U.S. Department of Commerce, together with the 
Agency for International Development and U.S. Departments of Defense and 
Energy, sponsored an Entrepreneurial and Defense Conversion Conference in 
Yekaterinburg, Russia from May 20-24, 1996. More than 40 U.S. business 
representatives and over 150 Russian representatives from the Urals participated 
in the conference and held business discussions about opportunities in central 
Russia. Through other Commerce efforts, such as the Special American 
Business Internship Training (SABIT) program, the Commercial Service officers, 
the Business Information Service for the New Independent States (BISNIS). and 
the American Business Centers, we have also supported the development of 
business ties between U.S. firms and converting Russian defense enterprises. 

Equipped with this installment of the Russian Defense Business Directory . 
American firms can access a wealth of business opportunities available in Russia. 
In doing so, they are equipped with the information to promote trade, investment, 
and free market know-how necessary to help speed Russia's transition to a 
market economy. 




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We encourage American companies to pursue vigorously the opportunities 
this Directory unveils. By doing so, they will advance the long-term goals of both 
nations—democracy, market reform, economic prosperity, and peace. 



Barry E. Carter 




CONSULATE GENERAL OF THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 



As U.S. Consul General in St Petersburg, Russia, I am 
very pleased that this edition of the U.S. Department of 
Commerce Russian Defense Directory is highlighting the City of 
St Petersburg and surrounding Leningrad Oblast . St Petersburg 
and the neighboring region have been at the heart of the 
Russian defense industrial complex since before the Russian 
Revolution in 1917. Today they are playing a leading role in 
the privatization process and development of a dynamic market 
economy in Russia; however, the major enterprises and 
institutes of this city and region face the difficult task of 
applying their defense technologies to civilian use. If they 
are to survive, they must shift their resources to producing 
consumer products which satisfy the needs of the Russian 
consumer and can compete on the world market . 

American firms are in a special position to cooperate 
with Russian enterprises in this effort since many American 
firms also are facing the challenge of defense conversion. 
American companies are world leaders in the management skills 
which Russian firms require. At the same time American firms 
now have access to a wide range of Russian technologies which 
can be developed to mutual benefit for the Russian and 
American economies. This directory is part of the U.S. 
Government's efforts to assist Russian and American firms in 
the defense conversion process. It offers a wide range of 
information which can help American companies identify 
business opportunities and potential partners. I encourage 
American firms to take advantage of the enclosed information 
to investigate this market. I and my staff at the U.S. 
Consulate stand ready to support your efforts. 

JBin^erelv, 





ohn M . Evans 
onsul General 




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American Consulate General 

U.S. Foreign Commercial Service 

57 Bolshaya Morskaya street 
St. Petersburg, 190000 Russia 



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Leningrad Region's place 
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Today the Leningrad 
areas for business and 
Federation. 

First, the Leningrad Region is the shortest sea link from 
the West to Russsia's enormous internal market. Second, the 
region is an active leader in industrial privatization and in 
private sector development. In addition, the Leningrad Region 
is endowed with a relatively well developed infrastructure and 
is rich in the availability of highly skilled specialists of 
most every profession. All these factors make the Leningrad 
Region a very attractive place to do business. 

In today's intensely competitive business world smart 
decision-making depends on quality sources information. I 
beleive that this publication will assist entrepreneurs and 
investors in understanding more fully the business environment 
in the Leningrad Region; it will also decrease their risk. 

Our region's enormous investment potential and rich 
cultural traditions combine to create a very favorable 
environment for mutually beneficial cooperation. We welcome 
your interest and look forward, to working with you. 



Alexander Belyakov, 

Governor of the Leningrad Region 





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Dear Readers, 





At this time of industrial reconstruction in Russia, cooperation with western countries and 
the United States becomes especially important. 

Business cooperation with American companies can be of great assistance to Russian 
enterprises as they enter the world market. 

The joining of our defense industry's high technologies and American experience in 
marketing and trade will help us save jobs which is the major goal of the St Petersburg 
administration. 

The main purpose of this directory is to help American companies locate appropriate 
enterprises for cooperation. Previous editions of the directory have already resulted in 
several cases of such cooperation. 

I wish the readers of this directory success in finding business partners in St Petersburg' 



Alexey L. Kudrin, 

First Deputy Chairman of the City Government 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



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U. S. & Foreign Commercial Service 

American Consulate General 

Bolshaya Morskaya Street, 57 

St Petersburg, Russia 




April, 1996 



On behalf of the U.S. Commercial Service in St Petersburg I 
welcome readers to this edition of the Department of Commerce 
Defense Conversion Directory, which focusses on the opportunities 
for American business in St Petersburg and the surrounding 
Leningrad Oblast . As the Directory demonstrates, the St 
Petersburg-Leningrad area is rich in business opportunities for 
American firms. St Petersburg has played a major role in the 
development of Russian technology and industry throughout the 
history of Russia and has a tradition of openness to foreign 
partners. It is the center of a dynamic and potentially enormous 
commercial market for American products and services. 

The Commercial Service office of the United States 
Consulate in St Petersburg was established in January, 1993 to 
assist American firms seeking to explore and develop commercial 
operations in Northwest Russia. We offer a variety of services 
to help American companies understand the local market, establish 
key business contacts and resolve problems encountered in 
starting operations in this region. We have a trained staff of 
Russian specialists and American officers ready to serve you. Our 
office is located in the center of St Petersburg. Co- located 
with the Commercial Service office is the American Business 
Center, which provides visiting American business representatives 
with essential business services, such as temporary office space, 
access to international telecommunications, translation, 
interpretation and other services. 

Please do not hesitate to contact our office. We look 
forward to working with you as you explore this exciting and 
challenging market. 

Sincerely, 




David K. Schneider 
Principal Commercial Officer 



Local Tel: (812) 110-6656 / 110-6727; Fax: (812) 110-6479 
International Tel: 7 (812) 850-1902; Fax: 7 (812) 850-1903 



Mail from U.S. American Consulate, St Petersburg - FCS. PSC 78 Box L. APO AE 09723 



Contact Information 



UNITED STATES COMMERCIAL SERVICE 
AMERICAN CONSULATE GENERAL 



57 Bolshaya Morskaya Street (second floor) 

190000 St .Petersburg, Russia 

Local telephone: 

Local fax: 

Int'l telephone: 

Int'l fax: 

Mail from the U.S.: 



812-110-6656 

812-110-6479 

7-512-850-1902 

7-512-850-1903 

American Consulate General-FCS 

PSC 78, Box L 

APO AE 09723 



Principal Commercial Officer 
Commercial Officer 
Commercial Assistant 
Commercial Assistant 
Commercial Assistant 
Commercial Assistant 
BISNIS Representative 
Office Manager 

Commercial Clerk/Receptionist 
Driver 



David K. Schneider 
Robert S . May 
Mikhail Minkevitch 
Alexander Kansky 
Marina Kamayeva 
Elena Kuzmina 
Alexei Kim 
Irina Sergeyeva 
Elena Lysova 
Dmitry Krutikov 



AMERICAN BUSINESS CENTER 
AMERICAN CONSULATE GENERAL 



57 Bolshaya Morskaya Street 

190000 St .Petersburg, Russia 

Local telephone : 

Local fax: 

Int'l telephone: 

Int'l fax: 

Mail from the U.S. : 



first floor) 



812-110-6042 
812-311-0794 
7-512-850-1900 
7-512-850-1901 
American Consulate 
PSC 78, Box L 
APO AE 09723 



General -ABC 



Manager 

Assistant Manager 
ABC Clerk 
ABC Receptionist 



Robert May 
Janna Agasieva 
Maria Chernobrovkina 
Kamilla Lapkina 



PREFACE 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



CHAPTER 1: 



ENTERPRISES IN ST. PETERSBURG/LENINGRAD OBLAST 



CHAPTER 2: 



MINI-PROFILES OF ADDITIONAL ENTERPRISES IN 
ST.PETERSBURG/LENINGRAD OBLAST 



CHAPTER 3: 



ENTERPRISES OUTSIDE LENINGRAD OBLAST 

AND UPDATES TO SOME 4TH EDITION ENTERPRISES 



CHAPTER 4: 



INVESTING IN RUSSIAN DEFENSE CONVERSION: 
OBSTACLES AND OPPORTUNITIES 



CHAPTER 5 
CHAPTER 6 
CHAPTER 7 
CHAPTER 8 
CHAPTER 9 



U.S.AND RUSSIAN EXPORT CONTROLS 

RECENT BILATERAL AGREEMENTS 

ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION 

SOURCES OF FINANCING 

INFORMATION ON RUSSIAN FEDERATION LAWS 
REGARDING DEFENSE INDUSTRY CONVERSION AND 
PRIVATIZATION 



CHAPTER 10: 



RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT AUTHORITIES INVOLVED IN 
DEFENSE CONVERSION 



CHAPTER 11: 



MARKET RESEARCH AND TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 
INFORMATION 



CHAPTER 12: 



DIRECTORY OF BUSINESS SERVICES 



CHAPTER 13 



COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE 
INFORMATION 



CHAPTER 14 



DEFENSE CONVERSION SUCCESS STORIES 



CHAPTER 15 



BUSINESS PRACTICES, SAFETY AND SECUR1 IV 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Juh loot, 



CHAPTER 16 DIRECTORY OF BUSINESS SERVICES 

FORMS: - Special American Business Internship Training 

(SABIT) Program Application 

- Directory Enterprise Profile (in Russian) 

- NTIS Order Form 

- BISNIS Search for Partners Form 

- Comments and Mailing List Request 



The Department of Commerce is providing this information to the U.S. business community 
to facilitate commercial contacts. It does not endorse any, or all, of these enterprises, nor does 
it intend for this list to comprise the enterprises which present the best Russian defense-related 
business opportunities. The department is not rank ordering the enterprises in any way. 

While the Department of Commerce has made every effort to ensure the reliability of the 
information contained in this directory, it cannot guarantee either its accuracy or 
completeness. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg i i 



PREFACE 

The U.S. Government as a whole has taken many steps to develop its cooperation with 
Russia and to promote Russian defense conversion. This Fifth volume of the Russian Defense 
Business Directory is a sign of the continued commitment of the U.S. Department of Commerce 
to assisting Russian defense industry in making a successful transition to profitable civilian 
endeavors. 

The Fifth volume focuses on opportunities for American business in St. Petersburg and the 
surrounding Leningrad Oblast. St. Petersburg has played a major role in the development of 
Russian technology and industry throughout the history of Russia and has a tradition of openness 
to foreign partners. It is the center of a dynamic and potentially enormous commercial market for 
U.S. products and services. 

Until recently, defense enterprises recently produced 70 percent of the city's output and 
employed half the work force. A few years back, St. Petersburg produced 25 percent of all the 
military hardware used in the Soviet Union. Almost 400 scientific research institutes are located 
in the city. The U.S. Government believes that the key engine of defense conversion will be U.S. 
private sector investment. Each chapter contains the following information: 

Chapter 1 - Full length profiles of 60 defense enterprises in St. Petersburg and Leningrad 
Oblast. 

Chapter 2 - Mini-profiles of (135) additional enterprises in St. Petersburg and Leningrad 
Oblast. 

Chapter 3 - Profiles of (15) enterprises outside Leningrad Oblast and updates to some 4th 
Edition enterprises. 

Chapter 4 - Information on investing in Russian Defense Conversion: Obstacles and 
Opportunities. 

Chapter 5 - Information on U.S. and Russian Export Controls. 

Chapter 6 - Recent Bilateral Agreements. 

Chapter 7 - Additional Sources of information. 

Chapter 8 - Government-backed and private sponsored Sources of Financing. 

Chapter 9 - Information on Russian Federation Laws regarding defense industry conversion and 

privatization. 



U.S. Department of Commerce .hilv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg i 



Chapter 1 - Information on Russian Government authorities involved in defense conversion. 

Chapter 1 1 - Regional and other useful information 

Chapter 12 - Market Research and Transportation services information. 

Chapter 1 3 - Information on Commercial & Residential Real Estate in St. Petersburg. 

Chapter 14 - Defense Conversion Success stories. 

Chapter 15 - Information on Business Practices, Safety and Security. 

Chapter 16 - Directory of Business Services. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD - St. Petersburg ii 



INTRODUCTION 



Federal and Regional Government officials have developed comprehensive plans for 
diversification of many of St. Petersburg's defense enterprises. However, individual enterprise managers 
generally make their own decisions regarding the extent and pace of conversion or diversification. The 
numerous opportunities for potential conversion projects make St. Petersburg defense enterprises a 
logical choice for foreign investment and partnership. As of April 1996, over 1 80 American companies 
had opened representative offices in St. Petersburg offering a wide spectrum of western services and 
products. About 30 of these companies have established manufacturing projects with local defense 
enterprises. 

Mayor Anatoliy Sobchak, elected for a five-year term in June of 1991, has been a leader of the 
democratic reform effort in Russia since 1989. Under his direction, the city government is openly 
probusiness and has lead a dynamic campaign of reform resulting in privatization of over 70% of St 
Petersburg's enterprises as of August 1994. The office of the Mayor of St. Petersburg has been 
upgraded to a Governorship and the new Governor is Vladimir A. Yakovlev. 

Considered the most European city in Russia, St. Petersburg is a cultural center with more than 
50 museums, including the world renowned Hermitage Museum, and approximately 40 theaters and 
concert halls, such as the Marinskiy (Kirov) and Maliy. St. Petersburg was founded by Peter the Great 
in 1703, and it is a major historical center that attracts up to a million tourists annually. St. Petersburg 
was the host city for the Goodwill Games in the summer of 1994. 

There are daily flights from the United States and many European capitals to St. Petersburg. 
Despite its many tourist attractions, St. Petersburg lacks an adequate tourist infrastructure in terms of 
hotels and restaurants. A city of 55 hotels, only two five-star hotels, with a total of 1,210 beds, offer a 
level of service at or near western standards. However, in the tourist industry, as in other sectors, there 
are numerous development projects underway or in the planning stage. St. Petersburg today is one of 
the most dynamic regions in Russia. 

LENINGRAD OBLAST 

The Leningrad Oblast (or region), with a population of 1 .8 million people, is a vast area covering 
85,900 km which surrounds St. Petersburg. Together, the city and Oblast represent the second largest 
industrial center in Russia. The Oblast stretches from the Finnish border in the northwest to Estonia in 
the southeast, and has 330 kilometers of coast line, with several natural bays and ports It is rich in 
natural resources and has a varied industrial and agricultural base closely linked to that of Si Petersburg 

The major industrial sectors in the Oblast are: metallurgy, electrical engineering, petrochemicals, 
light industry and food processing. Nearly 80 percent of the Oblast' s production is oriented towards 
regional and domestic needs. Over 300 enterprises in the Oblast are engaged in the manufacture of oil 
products, primary aluminum, mineral fertilizers, sulfuric acid, feed protein, cement, construction 

U.S. Department of Commerce Jr. 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg i 



materials, pulp and paper, food and consumer goods. Approximately 60 percent of these enterprises 
remain State run. The Oblast also has played a significant role in military-related production and its 
defense enterprises have close access to St. Petersburg's prestigious scientific and research facilities. 

The economy of the Oblast relies heavily on its natural resources of granite, sand, clay, 
limestone, combustible shale, bauxite, peat, and phosphates which are used in the construction 
industry, chemical production and peat production. Twenty per cent of the region's industrial 
production is derived from the forestry industry, wood processing and cellulose and paper industries. 
The local pulp and paper mills account for 8 per cent of the paper and 14 per cent of the cardboard 
produced in Russia. 

The Oblast possesses an extensive transportation system, including the October Railway, one 
of the largest railway systems in Russia, and a well-developed inland waterway system of rivers and 
canals. The road connections with Finland carry a substantial volume of cargo bound not only for St 
Petersburg but the rest of western and central Russia as well. Banking services in the Oblast are 
expanding, with many of Russia's largest banks operating in the Oblast. Due to the geographic 
diversity of the Oblast as well as its location on the northwestern border of Russia, it has a growing 
tourist industry totaling approximately 2 million visitors annually. 

The concept for the Oblast regional government was created by Peter the Great in 1708. 
Today the Oblast is a constituent subject of the Russian Federation and comprises 23 administrative- 
territorial units (17 districts and 6 towns). The current Oblast government, under the direction of 
Governor Alexander S. Belyakov, is taking a proactive role in guiding the region's development, 
especially with respect to port facilities and infrastructure projects. It has been particularly open to 
foreign investment and very cooperative with foreign firms which are considering the market 
opportunities in the Oblast. The Oblast's diverse geography and industrial base offer numerous 
opportunities for foreign Investment and joint projects in the defense diversification sector. 



FINDING ASSISTANCE IN ST. PETERSBURG 

Government Agencies 

Governor's Office: 

Committee on Foreign Relations 

Foreign Economic Relations Department 

Address: Smolny Tel: (812)271-0767 

Contact: Alexey B. Miller, Chairman Fax: (812) 278-1633 

Foreign Investments Department 

Address: Smolny Tel: (812)278-1679 

Contact: Sergey V. Balashov, Chairman Fax: (812) 278-1633 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg i i 



Registration Department (For registering new companies) 
Address: 6, Antonenko Street Tel: (8 1 2) 3 1 5-8 1 56 

Contact: Albert V. Stepanov Fax: (8 1 2) 3 1 2-62 1 7 

Deputy Chairman 

St. Petersburg Tax Authorities 

Address: 53, Liteiny Prospect Tel: (812) 272-0188 

St. Petersburg 191104 Fax: (812) 275-3742 

Contact: George Poltavchenko, 

Head of Department 

Committee on Economy and Finance 

Address: 16, Voznesensky Avenue Tel: (812)319-9360 

Contact: Igor Bakhmetiev, Tel: (812)319-9559 

Deputy Chairman Fax: (812)319-9554 

Economic Relations Department 

Address: 16, Voznesensky Avenue Tel: (812)319-9666 

Contact: Sergei E. Naryshkin Tel: (812) 3 19-9658 

Head of Department Fax: (812)319-9554 

Telex: 121465 LSWS SU 

Department of Analysis and Forecasting 
(Defense Industries Conversion) 

Address: 1 6, Voznesensky Avenue Tel: (8 1 2) 3 1 9-9072 

Contact: Nikolai Safronov Fax: (812)319-9554 

Department Chairman 

Department for Coordination of Federal 

and Regional Programs for Industrial Development 

Address: 1 6, Voznesensky Avenue Tel. : (8 1 2) 3 1 9-9622 

Contact: Oleg Mostov Fax: (812) 3 19-9554 

Department Chairman 



Associations and Business Organizations 

The Leontief Center 

Address: 16, Voznesensky Avenue Tel: (812) 3 19-9755 

Contact: Natalya I. Krivochenko Fax: (8 1 2) 3 1 9-98 1 4 

Director. E-mail: Leontief SPb SU 
Department of Foreign Economic Relations 



U.S. Department of Commerce Juh 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg i i i 



Union of Industrial and Building Enterprises 

Address: Entrance No. 5, Smolny Tel: (812) 278-1580 

Contact: Victor N. Ivanov, Fax: (812) 278-1580 

General Director 

Industrial Enterprises Association 

Address: 27, Engels Prospect Tel: (8 1 2) 25 1 -4003 

Contact: Valery A. Ushakov Fax: (812) 553-7001 
Director of Foreign Relations 

St. Petersburg Branch of the Committee of Defense Industry, 
Central Research Conversion Institute 

Address: 70, Krasnogo Flota Embankment Tel: (8 12) 3 1 1-5974 

Contact: Grigori B. Kezling, Director Fax: (812) 3 1 1-5960 

St. Petersburg Joint Venture Association 

Address: 36, Plehanova Street Tel: (812) 312-7954 

Contact: Vladimir I. Kogin Fax: (812)315-9470 

General Director Telex: 121 132 JVLEN SU 

St. Petersburg Chamber of Commerce and Industry 
Address: 46/48, Tchaikovskogo Street Tel: (812) 273-4896 

Contact: Victor M. Kuznetsov Fax: (812) 272-6406 

Deputy President Telex: 121324 LTPP SU 

Association for Intel Cooperation 

Address: 21, Fontanka Naberezhnaya Tel: (812) 3 1 1-4084 

Contact: Tatyana R. Kuzmina Fax: (8 1 2) 3 1 1 -4089 

Executive Director Telex: 1 2 1 649 LOSOD SU 

Other Helpful Resources 

St. Petersburg Stock Exchange 

Address: 279, Ligovsky Prospect Tel: (812) 298-893 1 

Contact: Grigory A. Rozhkov Fax: (812) 296-1080 

Director, Foreign Economic Relations 

OVIR (Department of Visas and Registration): 

Address: 4, Saltykova-Shchedrina Street Tel: (812) 278-2481 

Contact: Leonid A. Savitsky 

Head of OVIR 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg iv 



FINDING ASSISTANCE IN THE LENINGRAD OBLAST 

Government Agencies 

Leningrad Oblast Administration: 

Ministry for External Affairs Tel: (812) 274-4859 

Address: 67, Suvorovsky Avenue Fax: (812)274-5986 

Contact: Inna Bigotskaya 
External Affairs and Foreign 
Investments Department 

Associations and Business Organizations 

Economic Cooperation Association 

NW Territory-Russian Federation 

3, Smolny Street Tel: (812)274-4268 

St. Petersburg, Russia, 1933 1 1 (812) 274-8986 

Contact: Vladimir I. Maksimenko Fax: (812) 1 10 0040 

Deputy General Director 

Leningrad Regional Agency 

for Economic Development 

Address: 38, Serpukhovskaya Street Tel: (812) 316-2765 

St. Petersburg, Russia, 198147 (812) 110-1099 

Contact: Lyudmila V. Artamonova Fax: (812) 3 16-0521 

Director 

Lenoblvneshtorg Ltd. 

Address: 3, Smolny Street Tel: (812) 110-0006 

St. Petersburg, Russia, 1 933 1 1 Fax: (8 1 2) 1 1 0-09 1 4 

Contact: Vadim V. Lebedev 

Deputy Director 



U.S. Department .of Commerce Julv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg v 



CHAPTER 1 - DIRECTORY OF RUSSIAN ENTERPRISES 

A. PROFILE KEY ELEMENTS 

Each entry provides the following information: 

ENTERPRISE NAME: 

This entry provides the name by which the enterprise is most commonly known. We have also tried 
to provide the most commonly known alternative names of the enterprise. Names of facilities in 
Russian can vary widely. At times, some enterprises were known under the name of the building in 
which it was located or a location within a city. In addition, many enterprises have changed their 
names over the past year. 

ADDRESS/TELEPHONE: 

This entry provides the address in Russian format. Writing first is suggested. When following up on a 
lead by mail, the addresses should be written in the following format, preferably in Russian, to assure 
proper delivery: 

Country name in Russian 

Zip Code City 

Street Name, Street # 

Apartment/Office # 

Addressee (Name of company and contact) 

Country name in English 

Space is provided for telephone, telex, teletype, fax and Electronic Mail (E-Mail). Where 
no number appears, information will be added as it becomes available. The reliability of 
these numbers varies and the lines of communication are not always operating 

Telegrams are a useful and reliable mechanism for communications . Note that the Russian 
communications system differentiates among telegraph, teletype, and telex. Use 
International Access Code "Oil" to place a station-to-station call and "00" for operator- 
assisted calls (e.g., person-to-person calls). 

The Russian term "TELEGRAPH" refers to a telegraphic address using the city 
communications center, which delivers the telegram (comparable to sending a telegram via 
Western Union in the U.S.). The Russian term "TELETYPE" relates to the internal NIS 
(former Soviet Union) telecommunications system directly to a terminal at an enterprise 
The keyboard and printer are in Cyrillic. Finally the Russian term "TELEX" means the 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W^c 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 - 1 



international telex telecommunications system directly to a terminal at an enterprise. The 
keyboard and printer are usually in Latin characters. Some private information enterprises 
and most likely some city telecommunications centers offer a service of providing a 
manual interface between the Telex and Teletype or Telegraph systems. 

Increasingly, Russian government and enterprise officials are using Internet-compatible E- 
Mail (via domestic networks such as Relcom and international links such as SprintNet, 
Sovam Teleport, etc.) to communicate quickly, reliably and conveniently. Following 
issuance of the second installment, our own E-Mail has increased substantially, using the 
addresses listed therein. The process works! ! Information sent via an E-mail file requires 
approximately five percent the size of the corresponding fax file. E-Mail also provides 
greater flexibility than fax transmissions, as messages can be stored until the receiving end 
is operating. Moreover, E-Mail rates may be less expensive than fax rates at the point of 
origin. 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: 

This entry provides a general overview of the enterprise detailing its major products and 
technology. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: 

This lists the specific military focus of the enterprise (e.g. electronic components) and 
provides the nearest equivalent U.S. Standard Industry Classification (SIC) code(s) for it. 
When available, we intend to provide the Harmonized Tariff Schedule (HS) number(s). 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDINATION: 

In the past, one of several central ministries controlled Soviet defense industry enterprises. 
The majority of defense plants in Russia today are now subordinate to, although not 
strictly controlled by the Russian Ministry of Defense Industry. 

EMPLOYMENT: 

This provides the latest known number of employees. Today these figures are highly 
variable as many enterprises are in a state of flux as they restructure to adapt to an 
evolving economic system. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

This lists the known principal officers of the enterprise (along with their titles) 

OWNERSHIP: 

Until the past year, the state owned all defense enterprises in Russia. With the introduction 
of economic reforms, some have now become joint-stock companies as part of the 
privatization process and others are leased. Where known, this entry indicates who owns 
what share of joint-stock firms. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-2 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 

Date the enterprise was established. This information may provide some indication of the 
age of some of the basic-infrastructure at the enterprise. 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINE: 

This category lists products produced for the military. Again, this may provide an 
indication of the types of technology available. 

CIVILIAN PRODUCT LINE: 

This category lists products manufactured for civil use. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT EMPLOYED: 

Any known sophisticated facilities, equipment, or processes belonging to the enterprise are 
listed under this entry. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: 

This entry identifies any conversion plans or efforts currently taking place at the 
enterprise. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: 

This will identify any human resources support (e.g., housing, medical, child care) that the 
facility provides its work force. U.S. industry should take careful note of the additional 
financial burden these may impose on joint ventures and be prepared to address this issue 
in negotiations. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

This provides any additional relevant information. For example, if the facility is part of an 
association, this entry identifies the members of the association and provides the basic 
information (e.g., number of employees, product lines) for each. 

B. TRANSLANSLATION OF RUSSIAN ABBRIEVIATIONS 

Nil - Scientific Research Institute 

(G) NPO - (State) Scientific Production Association 

(G) NPP - (State) Scientific Production Enterprise 

AO - Joint Stock Company 

KB - Design Bureau 

ANTK - Aviation Scientific Technical Complex 

PO - Production Association 



U.S. Department of Commerce Julv l^Q^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 -3 



INDEX 



NAME OF ENTERPRISE PAGE 

ADMIRALTY SHIPYARD JOINT STOCK COMPANY 7 

ALL-RUSSIA SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND DESIGN INSTITUTE OF ENERGY 

TECHNOLOGY (VNTPIET) 8 

THE ALL-RUSSIA SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF TRANSPORT 

MACHINERY BUILDING JOINT STOCK COMPANY (VNIITM) 9 

ALL-RUSSIA SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF RADIO EQUIPMENT 

(VNIIRA) (AUSRJRE) 10 

ALL-RUSSIA SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF TELEVISION (NIITV) 1 1 

ALMAZ CENTRAL MARINE DESIGN BUREAU 12 

ARSENAL DESIGN BUREAU 1 3 

ARSENAL JOINT STOCK COMPANY 14 

AVANGARD JOINT-STOCK COMPANY 15 

BALTIC PLANT JOINT STOCK COMPANY 16 

BALTSUDOPROEKT CENTRAL DESIGN BUREAU 17 

CENTRAL DESIGN BUREAU OF MACHINE-BUILDING (TsKBM) 1 8 

CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE FOR MATERIALS (TsNIIM) 1 9 

CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

OF SHIPBUILDING 20 

DESIGN BUREAU OF SPECIAL MACHINE-BUILDING 2 1 

DOMEN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 22 

ELECTROPRTBOR CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 22 

ELECTROAVTOMATKA EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN BUREAU 23 

GIDROPRIBOR CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 24 

GRANIT CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 25 

IMPULS SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 25 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-4 



July 1996 



IZHORSKIY ZAVOD JOINT STOCK COMPANY 26 

KALININ PLANT STATE PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 28 

KIROV PLANT JOINT STOCK COMPANY 29 

KLMOV PLANT SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION ENTERPRISE 30 

KRASNAYA ZARYA STATE PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 32 

KRASNAYA ZARYA SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF 

ELECTROTECHNICAL SUPPLIES 33 

KRASNOZNAMENETZ STATE SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION ENTERPRISE 33 

KRYLOV CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 34 

LENINETS HOLDING CONCERN, JOINT STOCK COMPANY 3 5 

LENINGRAD OPTICAL-MECHANICAL ASSOCIATION (LOMO) 36 

LENINGRAD SEVERNYY ZAVOD PLANT PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 37 

MAGNETON JOINT STOCK COMPANY 38 

NEVSKOYE DESIGN BUREAU, JOINT STOCK COMPANY (Nevsky) 39 

OBUKHO V STATE PLANT 3 9 

OKEANPRTBOR SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 41 

PETROZAVOD JOINT STOCK COMPANY 4 1 

POISK SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 42 

POPOV RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE FOR RADIO 

BROADCASTING AND ACOUSTICS (NIIRPA) 43 

POZITRON JOINT STOCK COMPANY 44 

PRTMORSK SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL CENTER OF THE RUSSIAN SPACE 

CORPORATION ENERGIYA 45 

PROMETEY CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF 

STRUCTURAL MATERIALS 46 

PYROMETER JOINT STOCK COMPANY 47 

RADAR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 48 

RADUGA JOINT STOCK COMPANY 49 

f.S. Department of Commerce Juh 

DBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-5 



RAVENSTVO PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 50 

REDAN JOINT STOCK COMPANY 50 

RUBIN CENTRAL MARINE TECHNOLOGY DESIGN BUREAU 51 

RUSSIAN INSTITUTE OF HIGH-POWERED RADIO-BUILDING 52 

SEVERNAYA VERF SHIPBUILDING PLANT 53 

SEVERNOYE DESIGN BUREAU 54 

SIGNAL SCIENTIFIC-INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISE 54 

SREDNENEVSKIY SHIPBUILDING PLANT (Middle Neva) 55 

ST. PETERSBURG KRASNY OKTYABR MACHTNE-BUTLDrNG 

ENTERPRISE 56 

SVETLANA JOINT-STOCK COMPANY 57 

VAVTLOV STATE OPTICAL TNSTITUTE 59 

VEKTOR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 60 

VYBORG ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT- MAKING PLANT 6 1 

D.V. YEFREMOV STATE SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF 

ELECTROPHYSICAL APPARATUS 61 

ZVEZDA JOINT STOCK COMPANY 62 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-6 



ST. PETERSBURG 

Enterprise name: ADMIRALTY 
SHIPYARD JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Obedineniye 
"Admiralteyskiye Verfi", Leningradskoye 
Admiralteyskoye obedineniye (LAO), 
Admiralty Shipyards 

ADDRESS: 

190008, St Petersburg, Russia 
Naberezhnaya Reki Fontanki, 203 
Admiralty Shipyard Joint Stock Company 

Telephone: (011-7-812) 114-09-81, 114-87- 
23, 216-88-31, 114-88-81, 216-72-49; 216- 
76-07 (Commercial Director); 3 12-72-12 
(General Director); Telex: 121202 RIF SU; 
Teletype: 121721 RIF; Fax: (011-7-812) 
311-13-71 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Admiralty 
yard in St. Petersburg is one of the oldest 
and largest shipyards in Russia. It was 
established as the New Admiralty yard in 
1800, supplementing and soon replacing the 
Main Admiralty yard that had been founded 
in the center of the city a century earlier, and 
was transferred to its current location as the 
Admiralty Shipyard in 1908. It was a major 
builder of battleships in the 19th century and 
submarines and cruisers in the 20th. Since 
the mid-1950s its surface-ship facilities have 
specialized on large merchant ships, 
icebreakers, large rescue and salvage ships, 
fish-factory ships, floating dry docks, and a 
few naval auxiliaries (notably the three large 
missile range support ships of the Marshal 
Nedelin class). In 1966 the yard resumed 
submarine production with the delivery of a 



Victor I-class nuclear attack submarine, and 
production of Victor II and Victor Ill-class 
nuclear and Kilo-class diesel submarines 
followed. In 1972 Admiralty absorbed the 
Leningrad Shipbuilding and Mechanical 
Engineering (Sudomekh) yard, located on 
the original site of the New Admiralty yard 
and a specialist in submarine construction 
since the 1930s. The resulting entity was 
named the Leningrad Admiralty Association. 
In recent years, Admiralty has produced 
numerous specialized submersibles, including 
the civilian Sever-2 (1969), Tinro-2 (1972), 
Bentos (1975-1982), Tetis (1976), Osa, 
Argus, and Osmotr (1988) types, plus the 
naval Lima, Uniform, Xray, Beluga, and 
Paltus classes. Admiralty is still producing 
sea-going vessels, but it is also expanding 
into other technologies and products to 
support itself. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Shipbuilding; SIC 
Code: 2511, 2512, 2514, 2842, 3061, 3366, 
3354, 3412, 3465, 3523, 3531, 3547, 3548, 
3552,3567,3569,3714,3949 

FORMER MINISTRY 
SUBORDINATION Ministry of the 
Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 10,000; Date: 1991 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Vladimir L. Aleksandrov, General Director 
Yegor V. Kozlov, Commercial Director 

OWNERSHIP: Admiralty recently became 
a joint-stock company. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1704 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Naval 



U.§. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-7 



Juh NO(> 



warships including nuclear and diesel- 
powered submarines and large auxiliaries. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Merchant 
ships; submersibles; ship components 
including deck installations, boilers, water 
piping, propellers, ductwork, electrical 
equipment, and stateroom furniture; 
agricultural equipment including animal 
husbandry machines, grain elevators, and 
fodder processing equipment; engineering 
and building maintenance services; motor 
vehicle components; industrial machinery and 
equipment including automated pneumatic 
systems, lubrication equipment, filtration 
devices, rubber technology items, electrical 
equipment, and servomechanisms; wood and 
metal office furniture; scrap and waste metals 
reprocessing; containers; fiber processing 
machines; non-household plastic products; 
medicinal materials including equipment and 
instruments; warm air heating and air- 
conditioning equipment; construction 
materials; consumer products including 
tourist and sports equipment, dyes and 
household chemicals, and household 
furniture. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: The yard's building ways can 
accommodate ships up 70,000 deadweight 
tons, 250 meters in length and 35 meters in 
width. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Admiralty is 
offering additional product lines, including 
blast furnaces and steel mill equipment, 
rolling mill machinery, welding apparatus, 
metal stampings, aluminum extruded 
products, non-wire steel springs, measuring 
and controlling devices, metal barrels, drums 
and pails, as well as reconstituted wood 
products. 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

N/A 



Enterprise name: ALL-RUSSIA 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH AND 
DESIGN INSTITUTE OF ENERGY 
TECHNOLOGY (VNIPIET) 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Vserossiyskiy 
nauchno-issledovatelskiy i proektnyy institut 
energeticheskoy tekhnologii (VNIPIET); 
Ail-Union Design and Scientific Research 
Institute of Complex Power Engineering 

ADDRESS 

197228, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Savushkina, 82 

Tel.: (011-7-812) 239-1491 (Gen. Director); 
(812) 239-1991 (Technical Manager); Telex: 
N/A; FAX: (011-7-812) 239-0393 

GENERAL OVERVIEW VNIPIET 

prepares designs and project documentation 
for the construction, reconstruction, and 
technical refurbishment of atomic power 
stations. It is associated with many major 
projects in this field, including design of the 
containment sarcophagus for the damaged 
reactor at Chernobyl. It also does design 
work for radiochemical, metallurgical, 
mechanical, and instrument-engineering 
plants and performs research work on 
decontamination and removal of radioactive 
contamination and transportation of 
radioactive waste. 



PRIMARY BUSINESS: Nuclear 



July 1996 



1-8 



Equipment Design; SIC Code: 3462; HS#: 
N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of Medium Machine-Building 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 3,000; Date: 1992 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Edward K. Potyomkin, General Director 
Vladimir P. Soroka, Asst. to Gen. Manager 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1946 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Design of 
nuclear equipment. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES Design of 
nuclear reactors and power plants. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: Computers and computer- 
aided design equipment. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: VNIPIET is 

exploring possible uses of navy reactors for 
civilian purposes and is designing a facility to 
store fissionable material. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFO N/A 



Enterprise name: ALL-RUSSIA 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
OF TRANSPORT MACHINE- 
BUILDING JOINT STOCK COMPANY 



LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: VNIITM, 
VNlITransMash, Mobile Vehicle 
Engineering Institute. 

ADDRESS: 

198323, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Zarechnaya, 2 

Tel: (011-7-812) 135-9850, 135-9915; Fax : 
(011-7-812) 135-9837; 146-1618; E-Mail: 

N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: This facility 
probably designed and built prototypes of 
tanks, including the T-80, for the Kirov Plant 
Production Association. It is currently 
involved in the conversion of tank 
technology for civilian applications. It is also 
the production facility for the Russian Mars 
rover, which is being developed in concert 
with the Babakin Center and the Institute for 
Space Research. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Tank design 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 1269; Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Eduard K. Potemkin, General Director 
Vladimir P. Soroka, Assistant to Director 

OWNERSHIP: Joint stock company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1930 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : 

N/A 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Jul\ W*> 



1-9 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Proto- 
type tanks 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: Tracked 
transport vehicles, other commercial vehicles 
based on tank technology, remotely- 
controlled vehicles, " moonrovers," planetary 
surface vehicles. 

KEY TECH. & EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: The 

institute has convertedspace for the 
manufacture of log structures. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

VNIITransMash participated in a 
demonstration of a Russian Mars rover at the 
NASA Ames Center in early 1 993 in which 
the Russian hardware was sucessfully 
connected to American software. The 
institute is located in the Krasnoselskiy 
district at the southern edge of St. 
Petersburg and has set aside large amounts 
of production floorspace for use by 
interested sub-contractors. 



Enterprise name: ALL-RUSSIA 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
OF RADIO EQUIPMENT (VNHRA) 
(AUSRIRE) 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Vserossiyskiy 
nauchnoissledovatelskiy institut 
radioapparaturiy, All-Union Scientific 
Research Institute of Radio Equipment 
(AUSRIRE), Vasileostrovskiy Radio 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-10 



Apparatus Plant. 

ADDRESS 

199106, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Shkiperskiy protok, 19 

Tel: (011-7-812) 356-18-34; 351-17-07 
(Chief Designer) 356-01-40, 351-13-15 
(assoc. plant); Telex: 121320 NAUKA SU; 
Fax: (011-7-812) 352-37-04, 352-37-51 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: VNIIRA 
develops radio beacons, air navigation 
systems, surveillance and landing radars, air 
traffic-control systems, and IFF systems. It 
also develops techniques to render these 
systems immune to electronic warfare. 
VNIIRA-designed equipment is in operation 
throughout the former Soviet Union as well 
as among former Soviet client states, such as 
Finland, Yugoslavia, Mongolia, Hungary, 
Germany and Czechoslovakia. VNIIRA has 
developed the only category-Ill approved 
microwave landing system (MLS) in the 
world. A five-channel Global Positioning 
System (GPS) receiver and a four-channel 
Global Navigation Satellite System 
(GLONASS) receiver developed by VNIIRA 
is being installed in Tu-204 and IL-1 14 
airliners. VNIIRA's facilities include a 
production plant at its main St.Petersburg 
location and two subordinate design and 
production facilities in the Leningrad Oblast, 
one at Siverskaya and one at Zhigulyovsk. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Radio locating 
equipment; SIC Code: 3571, 3663, 3812 " 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Radio Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 4,000. Date: 1992. 



July 1996 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Gennadiy N. Gromov, Chief Dsgnr. General, 
Pavel N. Konokotin, Chief of Protocol Grp. 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1946 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Air 

navigation systems, pilot training systems, 
on-board instrumentation systems for the 
Russian space program, outfitted military 
trucks and vans with electronic equipment. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Weather 
radars, data processing equipment, 
automated air traffic control systems. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

VNIIRA is capable of fabricating digital 
processing devices utilizing gallium arsenide 
and semiconductor technology. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS 

GPS/GLONASS receivers, MLS systems 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

Eight directors of VNIIRA have joined 
together to form "Intra-Port," a small 
company that operates as a commercial front 
end to VNIIRA. Intra-Port is intended to 
help VNIIRA gain access to western 
technology and to help facilitate personnel 
matters. In 1990, VNIIRA began working 
with a U.S. avionics firm to prepare a 
proposal to the U.S. Federal Aviation 
Administration for the development of a 
microwave landing system. 



Enterprise name: ALL-RUSSIA 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
OF TELEVISION (NnTV) 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAME: Beserossiskiy 
nauchnyy issledovateniy institut televideniye 

ADDRESS: 

194021, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Politekhnicheskaya, 22 

Tel: (812) 247-4167, 247-3892; Fax: (812) 
550-6509, Telex: 121 140 VNIIT SU; 
Teletype: 322198 REKORD; E- mail: N/A; 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The All-Russia 
Scientific Research Institute of Television is 
Russia's pre-eminent organization for 
Russia's development of the research and 
equipment for producing, transmitting, and 
receiving TV programs, and for image 
processing in general. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS : Television 
equipment. broadcasting studios: SIC Code: 
3663,4833,4899,7812 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDIN. : 

Ministry of the Communications Equipment 
Industry. 

APPROX. EMPLOYMENT: Total 3,000; 
Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

MiKhail A. Grudinsky, Gerneral Director 
Vladimir V. Kovanko, Assistant to Director 

OWNERSHIP: 100 percent state-owned 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1 M; 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Julv 1** 



1-11 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Imaging 
equipment for global weather forecasting 
networks, television equipment for use in 
space, ultra-violet and infra-red cameras, 
underwater imaging equipment, and ground 
stations for satellite communications. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Television 
cameras, video cameras, microphones and 
equipment, telescope imaging enhancement, 
TV broadcasting studios, Video 
measurement equipment; medical 
instruments and television systems for 
microsurgery. 

KEY TECH. /EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : 

Image processing, television and satellite 
commn. equipment; SIC Code: 3651, 3651, 
3663,3671,3812,3826,4841 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Fifty percent of output goes to military and 
50 percent to civilian production. The 
institute relies on 300 to 400 suppliers. It is 
the preeminent institute in Russia for imaging 
technology ranging from space stations to 
underwater exploration. In addition to the 
facility in St. Petersburg proper, the Institute 
has two other facilities: a 95,800 sq. meter 
facility in Vyborg consisting of a 25,000 sq. 
meter laboratory production building, 8500 
sq. meter production building, a 25,400 sq. 
meter assembly and testing building and a 
5,000 sq. meter industrial complex currently 
under construction; as well as a 15,700 sq. 
meter facility in the Krasnoselsky region 
consisting of two laboratory production 
buildings. The institute is interested in 
working with U.S. companies. However, it 
does not have a specific enterprise. At this 



time, it proposes offering a highly trained 
staff of scientists, engineers and technicians, 
industrial space, raw material and energy 
resources from its research division. In 
exchange, it seeks investment from U.S. 
companies which would include modernized 
equipment and expertise in manufacturing, 
production, marketing and essentially every 
aspect of trade with western partners. The 
joint cooperation may include assembly and 
tuning operations, consumer goods, 
television and video cameras, for personal 
and professional use, as well as complex 
television production equipment. 



Enterprise name: ALMAZ CENTRAL 
MARINE DESIGN BUREAU 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Tsentralnoye 
morskoye konstruktorskoye byuro (TsMKB) 
"Almaz," CMDB Almaz. 

ADDRESS 

199155, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Uralskaya, 1 9 

Tel.: (011-7-812) 350-2983, 359-0239; 
Telex: N/A; Fax: (011-7-812) 350-9430 

GENERAL OVERVIEW Almaz is a 
leading designer of high-speed combat ships 
and boats, including dynamically supported 
craft (hydrofoils, hovercraft, and surface- 
effect ships). Almaz is the designer of the 
Dergach missile air cushion vehicle, the 
Nanuchka and Tarantul-class missile 
corvettes, the Matka-class missile hydrofoil, 
the Pauk-class anti-submarine warfare vessel, 
and the Pomornik-class air cushion vehicle. 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



July 1996 



1-12 



PRIMARY BUSINESS: Shipbuilding; SIC 
Code: 373, 3731; HS#:N\A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROX. EMPLOYMENT Total 600; 
Date: 1992. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICER 

Alexander Vasilevich Shlyakhtenko, Head 
and Chief Designer 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1940 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Designs 
for small surface combatants, including 
hydrofoil, air-cushion, and surface-effect 
ships. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Designs for 
fast passenger hydrofoils, air-cushion 
vehicles, surface effect ships, fast ferries, and 
others. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Almaz has 
developed surface-effect ships to be used as 
fast ferries for civilian use (Project"Mistral"). 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

The "Dergach," designed by Almaz, is the 
world's largest surface-effect ship. 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Enterprise name: ARSENAL DESIGN 
BUREAU 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: KB Arsenal 

ADDRESS 

195009, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Komsomola, 1/3 

Tel: (011-7-812) 542-2973, 542-2252; 
Telex: 121608 ARS SU; Teletype: 122774 
GROT; Fax: (01 1-7-812) 542-2060 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Arsenal 
Design Bureau is engaged in research and 
development and manufacturing of satellites 
and devices for space research and space- 
borne environment monitoring. It is 
collocated with the Arsenal Joint Stock 
Company . 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Space, Artillery; 
SIC Code: 3585, 3663, 4899; HS#: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 1,500; Date: 1996. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Vitaliy Sychev, General Director 
Boris Ivanovich Poletayev, Director 
Yuriy Fedorovich Valov, Deputy Director 
Boris Ivanovich Poletayev, Chief Designer 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1949 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Satellites 

Job woo 



1-13 



CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Design of 
satellites for scientific research, in 
cooperation with the Russian Academy of 
Sciences. Design of commercial satellite 
projects, including "Taxi" (piggybacking a 
customer's payload on a launch vehicle 
carrying a primary payload); "Platform" 
(custom-made space stations for scientific 
and commercial use accomodating payloads 
of up to 4 tons); and "Precursor" 
(Predvestnik), a satellite system for 
earthquake forecasting and monitoring of 
seismic activity. KB "Arsenal" also develops 
large refrigerating systems for storage 
facilities and warehouses. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Welding, high-vacuum processes, CAD- 
CAM, treatment and processing of light 
metals and light metal alloys. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS The Arsenal 
Design Bureau is focusing its conversion 
efforts on civilian satellite projects, satellite 
launch services, development of new types of 
internal combustion engines, camping stoves, 
electric samovars and propulsion systems. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT 

Arsenal sponsors an in-house program for 
scientific and technical training of employees. 



ALTERNATE NAMES: PO "Arsenal," PO 
"Arsenal" imeni M. V. Frunze 

ADDRESS: 

195009, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Komsomola, 1/3 

Tel: (011-7-812) 542-28-46, 542-70-77; 
542-36-30 (Deputy Director), 542-71-27 
(Deputy General Director for Foreign 
Economic Ties); Telex: 121608 ARS SU; 
FAX: (011-7-812) 542-71-27; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Historically, a 
major producer of artillery, the Arsenal Joint 
Stock Comapany also produces a variety of 
complex mechanical equipment, such as 
compressor stations, refrigeration and gas 
equipment, extrusion machines, and satellite 
platforms. It is collocated with the Arsenal 
Design Bureau. It is composed of 5 separate 
administrative entities: two civilian 
production operations, a military production 
operation, a technical support facility, and a 
commercial center. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Artillery; SIC 
Code: 3489, 3542, 3585, 3679; HS#: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDIN. : 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 



OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

Arsenal has close links with the Russian 
aerospace industry. 



Enterprise name: ARSENAL JOINT 
STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 



APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 8,000; Date: 1996. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Vyacheslav G. Petrov, General Director, 
Vladimir I.Grigorieu, Deputy Director 
Mikhail A. Myslin, Deputy Director 
Aleksandr N. Chlennikov, Deputy Director 
Petr S. Kushnir, Deputy General Director, 
Foreign Economic Ties 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



July 1996 



1-14 



OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 



LAST UPDATE: December 1995 



YEAR ESTABLISHED 1719 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 1 10mm 
naval guns. 

CrvTL PRODUCT LINES High-purity 
liquid nitrogen production equipment, 
autonomous thermal power plants with 
Stirling-type engines, special-purpose mobile 
screw compressors, extrusion equiptment, 
hydraulic pumps, precision machine tools & 
toys. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Welding, high vacuum processes, CAD- 
CAM, treatment and processing of light 
metals and light metal alloys. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS The plant is 
expanding its production of air compressors, 
medical instruments, and household 
appliances, and is introducing the production 
of refrigeration equipment. It produces gas 
pistols used for self-defense. Only 45 
percent of Arsenal's orders come from the 
defense sector. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT 

Arsenal sponsors an in-house program for 
scientific & tech. training of employees, and 
supports kindergartens & medical clinics. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

Arsenal has a large capacity for further 
growth and owns tracts of land outside of St. 
Petersburg. It is collocated with the Arsenal 
Design Bureau. 



Enterprise name: AVANGARD JOINT- 
STOCK COMPANY 

U.S. Department of Commerce - 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-15 



ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionnernoye 
Obshcnestvo "Avangard", AO "Avangard", 
NPO "Avangard", 

ADDRESS 

195271, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Kondratyevskiy prospekt, 72 

Tel: (011-7-812) 540-1550, 540-1955, 543- 
9545, 544-6901; Fax: (011-7-812) 540- 
1844; Telex: 121431 NTS SU; Teletype: 
122299 GNOM; E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Avangard was 
the leading enterprise of the former Ministry 
of the Radio Industry, developing and 
manufacturing high precision special 
electronic components for communications 
systems, satellites, and military rockets. 
Avangard consists of two research institutes 
and two production plants which develop 
and produce components for electronics, 
processing equipment, and instrumentation 
for the instrument-making industry. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electronics; SIC 
Code: 3663, 3674, 3679, 3695, 3812, 3823, 
3825, 3829 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Radio Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Vakhtang P. Koveshnikov. General Director 
Konstantin B. Sukhomlin, Dir Econ Don 
Anatoly I. Artemiev, Chief Engineer 

OWNERSHIP: Joint-Stock Company 



Jul} 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1948 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: High 
precision electronic components for military 
communication systems, satellites, & missile 
systems. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Laser optical 
video disks, all-wave TV channel selectors, 
& electronic components for civil 
applications. 

KEY TECHNOLOGY/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 



doctors of science and more than 60 
candidates of science. 



Enterprise name: BALTIC PLANT 
JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionnernoye 
Obshsnestvo "Baltiyskiy zavod," AO 
Baltiyskiy zavod, Baltic Shipyard, Baltic 
Works, Baltiyskiy zavod imeni Sergo 
Ordzhonikidze 



CONVERSION PROJECTS Avangard 
Joint Stock Company has proposed joint 
engineering development of a method for 
annealing structural defects in semiconductor 
or dielectric crystals using acoustical 
oscillations at room temperature. They have 
stated that they have carried out basic 
research work and obtained samples of a 
structure that had a low defect concentration 
level, and that the technique makes possible 
annealing crystal defects virtually on every 
stage of a device fabrication process, 
allowing a noise level decrease, higher 
charge carrier mobility, and improved 
amplification of a device. Avangard has also 
developed microelectronic chemical sensors 
for environmental protection applications 
and lavistor semiconductor instruments with 
enhanced radiation resistance for work in 
high radiation zones. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Avangard has been involved in a joint project 
with 27 Russian and German research 
institutes and companies to develop new gas 
sensors. The Avangard staff includes 9 



ADDRESS 

199026, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Kosaya Liniya, 16 

Telephone: (011-7-812) 217-95-80, 217-93- 
06, 217-93-00, 217-93-75, 217-10-79 
(Director); Telex: 121141 BSHL SU; Fax: 
(01 1-7-812) 217-22-96, 217-29-06; E-Mail: 
N/A; Teletype: 122581 VINT 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Baltic Plant 
is one of the largest shipyards in the former 
Soviet Union. It is capable of building 
merchant ships up to 45,000 deadweight 
tons and nuclear powered cruisers. The 
Baltic Plant Production Association was 
formed in 1989 by the merger of the Baltic 
Shipyard and a special design bureau for 
boiler construction. It became a joint-stock 
company in 1 993 . 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Shipbuilding; SIC 
Code: 3443, 3556, 3585, 3589, 3731; HS #: 

N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-16 



July 1996 



APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 12,000; Date: 1990. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Oleg B. Shulyakovskiy, General Director 
E.I. Koshelev, Deputy General Director 
Y.I. Lopatin, Deputy Manager 



a founder of the Transokeanik Joint-Stock 
Society along with the Nevskoye Design 
Bureau. Transokeanik's role is to establish a 
maritime passenger line between St. 
Petersburg and New York, primarily aimed 
at businessmen. 



OWNERSHIP: Joint-stock. The sale of 
shares began in March 1 993 . 



Enterprise name: BALTSUDOPROEKT 
CENTRAL DESIGN BUREAU 



YEAR ESTABLISHED 1856 



LAST UPDATE: December 1995 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Kirov- 
class nuclear-powered cruisers. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Merchant 
ships; chemical tankers; nuclear-powered 
icebreakers; quick-freezing units; cooking 
boilers; sausage-making machines. The 
shipyard has presented designs for 40,000 
dwt double hull tankers. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED 

The shipyard has two open slipways: one of 
250m x 30m and a second of 375m x 40.5m. 
The latter is one of the largest in the former 
USSR. The yard also has shops for castings 
and production of ship components such as 
large shafts and propellers. Transport and 
storage of steel sections not suited for units 
of more than approximately 80 metric tons. 
Outfitting quay served by four cranes of 50 
mt capacity; another 1 1 cranes of 50 mt 
capacity serve the two open building ways. 



ALTERNATE NAMES TsKB 
BALTSUDOPROEKT, Tsentralnoye 
Konstruktorskoye Byuro "Baltsudoproekt" 

ADDRESS 

190068, St. Petersburg, Russia, 
Kanal Griboyedova, 90 

Tel: (011-7-812) 310-34-23, 314-21-75, 
3 14- 11 -71; Fax: (01 1-7-8 12) 3 14-00-95 
Telex: 121345 PTB SU FOR VATMAN 
E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The enterprise 
designs various types of civilian and 
specialized military ships. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Ship Design; SIC 
Code: 8711 

FORMER MINISTRY SI BORDN. 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding industry 



CONVERSION PROJECTS Merchant 
ships; chemical tankers. 



APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 750; Date: 1994 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

The Baltic Plant Joint Stock Company is also 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

NikolayN. Rodionov, Director 
Valery N. Kruglov, Technical Director 



Juh 



1-17 



OWNERSHIP: State-owned 
YEAR ESTABLISHED 1925 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Design of 

special-purpose ships for the Navy. 

CIVIL PRODUCTS LINES Design of 
fishing and cargo ships; container ships, 
passenger ferries and tugboats. 

KEY TECH. / EQUIPMENT 

EMPLOYED: N/A. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: 

Development of floating diesel-electric 
power-generating stations. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Ships designed by Baltsudoproekt are being 
built at different shipyards in St. Petersburg, 
Kerch (Ukraine), and other cities in Russia. 



Design Bureau of Machine-Building 
(TsKBM) is responsible for the design, 
research, and prototype development of 
industrial gas centrifuges for uranium isotope 
separation. It is involved in gaseous 
diffusion technology and thermionics, and is 
also developing thermionic space-based 
nuclear power reactors in the "Topaz" series. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Nuclear fuel 
processing & reactor design; SIC Code: 
2421, 2426, 3429, 3563, 3567, 3675, 3821 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of Medium Machine-Building 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 1,500-2,000; Date: 1991. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Vladimir P. Nikitin, Chief 

Yevgeniy Sokolov, First Deputy Director 



OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 



Enterprise name: CENTRAL DESIGN 
BUREAU OF MACHINE-BUILDING 
(TsKBM) 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Tsentralnoye 
konstruktorskoye byuro mashinostroyeniya 
(TsKBM) 

ADDRESS 

195272, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Krasnogvardeyskaya Ploshchad, 3 

Telephone:; N/A; Fax: N/A; Telex: N/A; 
Teletype: 122817 DELTA; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Central 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1945 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Prototypes of gas centrifuges for uranium 
isotope separation, TEC-3 portable 1 .2 
megawatt nuclear power reactors, fuel 
loading machines for RBMK reactors (high- 
power channel reactors), equipment for 
uranium enrichment, uranium and uranium 
products, and nuclear submarine reactor 
cooling pumps. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: Turbo- 
molecular pumps for the chemical industry, 
microelectronic components, and furniture. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED In 

1991 TsKBM was authorized to use Western 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-18 



July 1996 



technology and equipment in its 
manufacturing processes. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: TsKBM 

began about 1989 to produce turbo- 
molecular pumps for the chemical industry, 
microelectronics components, a deep 
vacuum system to ensure the purity of 
microelectronics materials produced at the 
facility and at other plants throughout 
Russia, and furniture. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

TsKBM, together with the Kurchatov 
Atomic Energy Institute, Moscow, and the 
Luch Scientific Production Association, 
Podolsk, developed the "Topaz-2", a small 
nuclear reactor capable of powering various 
types of spacecraft for periods of up to five 
years. The program was stopped for lack of 
funds, but the International Scientific 
Production Corporation, a U.S. firm, has 
proposed a joint project to use Topaz 
systems in civilian space programs. 



271-2288 (Deputy Director); Fax: (01 1-7- 
812) 110-7660, Telex: 121345 PTB SU; 
Teletype: N/A; E-mail: dmitryicy, crim.spb.su 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Central 
Scientific Research Institute of Materials 
conducts research and development of a 
wide variety of materials, including steels, 
alloys, and composites, for military weapon 
programs and space programs. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS materials 
research; SIC Code: 2821, 3479, 3531, 
3532, 3556, 3679 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 300; Date: 1994 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Boris Ivanovich Poletayev, Director 
Yuri Fedorovich Valov, Deputy Director 

OWNERSHIP: state-owned. 



YEAR ESTABLISHED 1912 



Enterprise name: CENTRAL 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
FOR MATERIALS (TsNHM) 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Tsentralniy 
Naucnyy Issledovatelniy Institut Materialov 

ADDRESS 

191014, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ultisa Paradraya, 8 

Tel.: (011-7-812) 271-4972 (Gen. Director), 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Development of aircraft, missiles, and space- 
related products from steel alloys, and 
composite materials and equipment for their 
production. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Development 
of high-strenuth structural steels and alloys; 
high-temperature alloys, including 
superalloys; materials with special properties, 
including damping, magnetic properties, low 
coefficient of thermal expansion, and shape 
memory effects, ceramic structural and 
electrical insulating materials, ceramic 

Jul\ 1 ooo 



1-19 



resistant to molten metal; metal, ceramic, 
carbon, and poymer matrix composites; tool 
steels and alloys, including powder 
metallurgy materials, for cutting tools and 
dies; protective, wear-resistant electrolytic, 
thermally sprayed. Plasma vacuum coatings; 
and various welding processes including 
underwater welding equipment, 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Technologies and equipment for production 
of materials for special purpose equipment 
(machinery). 

CONVERSION PROJECT N/A 

HUMAN RESOURCES: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The principal mission of the Institute has 
been the development of materials and 
process technology aimed at the defense and 
space industry. The institute is now 
focussing its resources on establishing joint 
development programs with private sector 
companies in Russia and Western countries. 



0522 (international dept.), 186-1600; Fax: 
(011-7-812) 186-0459; E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Central 
Scientific Research Institute of the 
Technology of Shipbuilding is Russia's 
principal research and development center 
for advanced materials, metallurgical 
processes, and fabricating techniques for the 
shipbuilding industry in Russia. It launches 
and tests ships. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Development of 
shipbuilding techniques. It also designs 
special purpose equipment for shipyards and 
other industries; SIC Code: 3731, 8711 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 2,000; Date: December 1995. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Vladmir D. Gorbach, Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned 



Enterprise name: CENTRAL 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
OF TECHNOLOGY OF 
SHIPBUILDING 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1939 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Develops 
advanced materials and production 
technology, including production equipment, 
for ships and submarines. 



ALTERNATE NAME: TsNII of the 
Technology of Shipbuilding, Central 
Scientific Research Institute of Shipbuilding 

ADDRESS: 198095, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Promyshlennaya, 7 

Telephone: (011-7-812) 186-0401, 186- 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: Techniques for 
analyzing and reducing vibration and noise in 
industrial and residential buildings. It 
assembles equipment and mechanisms for 
ships. It does interior decoration for ships. 

KEY TECH./EQUEPT. EMPLOYED: 

Laboratories for the study of vibration and 

July 1996 



1-20 



sound. 



design; SIC Code: 871 1; HS#: N/A 



CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 

OTHER REVELANT INFORMATION: 

The Institute was formerly part of the RITM 
Scientific Production Association. It is 
interested in developing new projects in 
software, specialized lighting, automation, 
vibration reduction and noise abatement 
areas. The enterprise is willing to organize 
and hold international and regional 
exhibitions, symposiums and seminars. The 
enterprise is a founder of several scientific 
societies. 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of General Machine-Building 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 2,000; Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Nikolay A. Trofimov, Constr. Dsgn. Mgr. 
Vladimir G. Doblenkov, Chief Engineer 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1947 



Enterprise name: DESIGN BUREAU 
FOR SPECIAL MACHINE-BUILDING 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Engineering for large-scale military 
structures. 



LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALT. NAMES: Konstruktorskoye byuro 
spetsialnogo mashinostroyeniya (KBSM) 

ADDRESS: 

194223, St Petersburg, Russia 
Lesnoy Prospekt, 64 

Tel. : (011-7-812) 245-5113 (Construction 
Design Manager), 245-5133 (Technical 
Manager); 245-3133, 542-8392; Telex: 
321223 PIK; Fax: 245-3618; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW KBSM 
undertakes scientific research and design 
work for various machines, mechanisms, and 
mechanical engineering equipment, including 
large load-bearing structures requiring 
heavy-duty shock-absorbing or high-pressure 
pneumatic systems. 



CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Shock- 
absorbing systems for nuclear power plants 
and other large civil engineering structures. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: Pneumatic high-pressure 
sealed cylinders, computer-assisted 
calculations, slow-motion filming of high- 
speed processes, production control 
technology for dynamic load structures 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Protection of 
installations against earthquakes. The active 
and passive shock-absorbing systems 
developed at KBSM are based upon a 
number of inventions and are competitive 
with Japanese systems. Planning is being 
undertaken for earthquake protection in 
California and Hawaii. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 



PRIMARY BUSINESS: Engineering. 



OTHER RELEVANT INFO \ \ 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Jul\ 



1-21 



for radar and space communications. 



Enterprise Name: DOMEN SCIENTIFIC 
RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Nil "Domen", 
Domain Research Institute. 

ADDRESS: 

196084 St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Chernigovskaya, 8 



CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Opto- 
electronics, development and production of 
prototypes of piezoelectric devices and 
electromechanical filters, indicators, coils, 
ferrites and magneto-dielectics, electric 
connectors, switching and wiring articles. 

KEY TECH. /EQUEPT. EMPLOYED 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 



Telephone: (011-7-812), 294-7143, 294- 
8033, 297-2334; Telex: 121014 FERCO SU; 
Teletype: N/A; Fax: (01 1-7-812) 298-3497 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Nil Domen is 
well known for its ferrite materials, 
components, and devices, which are 
important elements of radioelectronic 
systems such as radars, radioastronomy, 
telecommunications, and of many others. 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

This Research Institute was formerly part of 
the Ferrite Scientific Production Association. 



Enterprise name: ELEKTROPRIBOR 
CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 
INSTITUTE 



PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electronics; SIC 
Code: 3264, 3643, 3679, 3824 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Electronics Industry 



LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Tsentralniy 
nauchnyy issledovazelskiy institute 
"Elecktropribor", TsNII Elektropribor. 



APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Valeriy V. Filippov, Director General 

OWNERSHIP: N/A 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1969 



ADDRESS: 

197046, St. Petersburg, Russia, 
Ulitsa Malaya Posadskaya, 30 

Tel: (011-7-812) 232-5915, 232-3118 
(plant); Fax: (011-7-812) 232-3376, 232- 
7467 (Plant), E-Mail: N/A; Telex: N/A; 
Teletype: N/A 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Microwave ferrite materials and components, 
microwave and millimeter wave equipment 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-22 



GENERAL OVERVIEW: The 

Elektropribor Central Scientific Research 
Institute is a highly regarded organization 

July 1996 



specializing in the design and manufacture of 
gyroscopic systems for naval and commercial 
vessels. It has an experimental production 
plant. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Gyroscope 
development; SIC Code: 3511, 3577, 3625, 
3679,3728,3731 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 3,200 employees (including "Azimut- 
Electropribor" Experimental Production 
Plant); Date: December 1995 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Vladimir G. Peshekhonov, Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1927 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Design 
of gyroscopic systems for submarines and 
surface vessels. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Design of low 
power wind generators, medical equipment 
and ship stabilizers for satellite TV antennae 
and scanners. 



LAST UPDATE: February 1996 
ALT. NAMES: Electoavtromatika OKB 

ADDRESS 

198095, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Marshala Govorova, 40 

Tel: (011-7-812) 252-1398; Fax: (011-7- 
812) 252-3817; Telex: N/A, E-mail: N/A. 

GENERAL OVERVIEW 

Elektroavtomatika is involved in the 
development of electronic systems for 
Russian military and civil aircraft. Specific 
types of products produced by 
Elektroavtomatika include include digital 
displays, flight management systems (for 
civil, military and space applications), 
airborne computers for civil and military 
applications, airborne instrumentation and 
simulators, as well as the software used in 
various computers and systems. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electronics; SIC 
Code: 3571, 3679, 3728, 3812, 7371 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 1,000; Date: December 1995 



KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Pavel P. Paramonov, Director 



CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 



OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 



YEAR ESTABLISHED 1946 



Enterprise^'ELEKTROAVTOMATlKA' 
EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN BUREAU 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Digital 
displays, flight management systems, 
airborne computers, missile guidance 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Jul\ 



1-23 



systems and software. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Digital 
displays, flight management systems, 
airborne computers, simulator systems and 
software. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS The principal 
approach of Elektroavtomatika in the 
conversion area is the commercial 
application for its current products including 
foreign customers. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVENT INFORMATION 

Elektroavtomatika has formed two joint 
ventures: 

~ in 1 993 with Astronautics Corporation and 
Kearfott Guidance (USA). AKE is involved 
in design and development of control and 
display units, flight instrument systems, and 
flight management systems for civil aircraft; 
- in 1995 with CATIC (CHINA) LC Ltd., is 
engaged in airborne computer production, 
soft ware design, commercial electronics 
design and production. 



Enterprise name: GIDROPRIBOR 
CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 
INSTITUTE 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Tsentralniy 
nauchnyy issledovatelniy institut 
"Gidropribor", TsNII Gidropribor 

ADDRESS 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-24 



194175, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Bolshoi Sampsonievsky Prospect, 24 

Tel: (011-7-812) 248-1032, 248-2884, 248- 
2703; Fax:: (011-7-812) 542-4663; Telex: 
n/a; Teletype: 121338 MORE; 
E-Mail: gidroprb@ sovam. com 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Gidropribor is a 
leading institute in the development of types 
of marine underwater techniques. The main 
activity of the institute is fundamental 
research in the areas of hydro-gas dynamics, 
hydro-acoustics, hydro-mechanics, 
management and stabilization of automatic 
systems. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Underwater 
equipment development; SIC Code: 3569, 
3731,3812 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 2,300; Date: 1995. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Oleg Alekseyevich Ivanov, Director 
Leonid I. Voronin, Assistant Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1944 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Underwater naval weapons 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Hydro-acoustic 
equipment, mobile underwater automatic 
station, self-contained ecological monitoring 
stations, wireless systems for hydro-acoustic 
control of underwaterdevices and vessels, 

July 1996 



medical and agricultural equipment. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED 

Underwater acoustic R&D, underwater 
robotics. 



Vladimir A. Nikoltsev, Director 
OWNERSHIP: state-owned 
YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1921 



CONVERSION PROJECTS N/A. 



Enterprise name: GRANIT CENTRAL 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: TsNII Granit, 
Tsentralniy nauchno-issledovatelskiy institut 
"Granit" 

ADDRESS: 

191014, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Gospitalnaya, 3 

Tel: (011-7-812)271-6756 
Fax: (01 1-7-8 12) 274-63 3 9 
E- Mail: peter@oliv.sbnet.ru 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Granit is a 
research institute specializing in naval-related 
electronic control systems. 

PRODUCT SPECIALTY: Electronic 
control and detection systems; SIC Code: 
3625,3761,3825,3826,3829 

FORMER MINISTRY 
SUBORDINATION : Ministry of the 
Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 1,500; Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

U.S. Department of Commerce ■ 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Development of missile guidance systems, 
ship-based fire-control systems and non- 
acoustic means of ship detection. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: Cardiac 
monitoring equipment, automobile 
communication systems. 

KEY TECH./ EQUEPT. EMPLOYED 

N/A 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 



Enterprise name: IMPULS SCIENTIFIC 
PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: NPO Impulse 

ADDRESS: 

195220 St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Obruchevykh, 1 

Tel: (011-7812) 243-9765, 530-9343 
(Experimental Plant); Fax : (01 1-7-812) 243- 
9642, (Expl. Plant), E- Mail: N/A; telex 
121033 IMPL; Teletype: 321205 BARK 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Impuls 

Scientific Production Association develops 
and produces combat control systems for 
missile- and space-launch complexes, as well 
as information processing systems It 
includes an experimental plant and an 

Jul\ W^o 



1-25 



experimental design bureau. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Combat control 
systems. 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDIN. : 

Ministry of General Machine Building 
APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 4,161; Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Boris G. Mikhailov, Director 
Vyacheslav V. Onishchenko, Head of the 
Foreign Relations Department. 

OWNERSHIP: state-owned 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1960 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Combat 
control systems and information ciphering 
equipment. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Microwave 
ovens. 

KEY TECH. / EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 
HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

N/A 



Enterprise name: IZHORSKIY ZAVOD 
JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionnernoye 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



obshchestvo "Izhorskiy Zavod", AO 
Izhorskiy Zavod; Izhora Plant, Izhora Plant 
Joint Stock Company 

ADDRESS: 

189630, St. Petersburg (Kolpino), Russia 
Prospekt Lenina, 1 

Tel: (01 1-7-8 12) 48 1-8 11 0,48 1-8 102 (Gen. 
Director), 481-81 10, 481-8150 (Director of 
Foreign Trade Firm); Telex: 121435 
IZHORA SU; Teletype: 321613 MARTEN; 
Fax:(01 1-7-812) 463-9269 (Director of 
Foreign Trade Firm) 

GENERAL OVERVD2W: The Izhora Plant 

was established in 1722 by the Russian Navy 
on the Izhora River as a sawmill. Today its 
joint stock company is one of the leading 
metallurgical and machine-building 
enterprises in Russia with 20 separate plants 
and departments. The company is one of 
three major builders of nuclear reactors in 
the former Soviet Union, and it makes heavy 
machinery and numerous other products for 
both the military and civilian sectors. The 
main facility, located in the St. Petersburg 
suburb of Kolpino, consisted in 1991 of four 
large divisions and one smaller division. A 
foreign trade firm was created in 1987 to 
market the firm's products in international 
markets, and the firm currently exports to 
more than 20 countries. Five design bureaus 
are also part of the company. Orders for 
military products declined drastically by the 
early 1 990s and the plant's production lines 
for armored vehicle components were 
reportedly idle in early 1993. The Izhora 
Plant is a founding member of the St. 
Petersburg Military Industrial Corporation, 
set up in mid- 1992 to earn capital for 
conversion of defense plants to civilian 
production. 

July 1996 



1-26 



PRIMARY BUSINESS: Heavy machines, 
nuclear reactors; SIC Code: 3325, 3369, 
3443, 3463, 3469, 3511, 3531, 3599, 3621, 
3634 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of Heavy Machine-Building 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 22,616; Date: 1993. 



•j" * "> 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Vladimir G. Vasilyev, General Director 
Deonisii D. Stepanyuk, 

Director of Foreign Trade Firm 
Alexander I. Baranov, Deputy Director of 

Foreign Trade Firm 

OWNERSHIP: Joint stock. Share of 
ownership: 75% state, 25% private. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1722 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Armor; 
armored vehicle hulls; tank turrets; tank 
track wheel assemblies; nuclear reactors for 
submarines; titanium for submarine hulls. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Articles rolled, 
hammered and pressed from titanium alloys; 
300 varieties of steel castings; propeller 
shafts; excavators and other large machines; 
equipment for mineral oil handling; reactors, 
generators and other equipment for atomic 
power stations; turbine and turbine generator 
sets and rotors; automobile mufflers; kitchen 
utensils; fabricated plate work. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED The 

plant has facilities for hammer forging and 
pressing, rolling steel pipes and plates, 
electroplating, and thermal treating. 
Technology for vacuum welding of hard 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-27 



alloys and steel was installed in 1988. The 
Izhora Plant is also constructing a 125-ton 
capacity electric arc melting facility, which is 
to be completed in mid- to late 1993. 
Special vehicles are used to transport 
radioactive isotopes. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Storage 
tanks for various types of fuel began to be 
produced following the decline in military 
orders in the late 1980s, as well as containers 
for nuclear waste. Izhora also plans to 
increase its steel production during the 
1990s. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT 

Medical center, rest house, sports complex, 
culture club, tourist sanitary center, and 1 2 
hostels. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The Izhoraskiy Zavod Joint Stock Company 
has an agreement with a U.S. firm for joint 
venture production of pipe molds and other 
products. It also has two similar joint 
ventures, known as IZMET, with the French 
firms SIBCO and SOCONET. The French 
steel company SADEFA is marketing 
IZMET's products in the West. Izhora is 
also reportedly involved in a joint venture 
with the U.S. firm Bechtel and the South 
Korean firm Lucky Development Company 
to build an electronics plant to produce home 
appliances and a business complex consisting 
of a hotel, apartments, and a shopping 
center. The joint venture also involves 
development of chemical and lumbering 
plants in St. Petersburg, as well as other 
basic industries in Russia. The firm has a 
contract with a university in the U.S. for a 
management training exchange program It 
also has an agreement for management 
consulting services with Bechtel Civil Since 

July l^ 



the late 1980s, Izhorskiy has been part of 
the Leningrad (St. Petersburg) Energomash 
Energy Corporation, a State Interbranch 
Production Association (GMPO) that 
consolidates as many as 1 5 enterprises in the 
field of power equipment, including nuclear 
reactor production facilities. 



Enterprise name: KALININ PLANT 
STATE PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: PO Zavod imeni 
M.I. Kalinina, 

ADDRESS: 

199155, St. Petersburg, Russia 

Ulitsa Uralskaya, 1 

Tel: (01 1-7-812) 350-1 176, 350-8704, 350- 

0243 (Commercial Director), 350-1354 

(Director); Telex: N/A; Fax: (011-7-812) 

352-5735,351-8752 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Kalinin 
Plant State Production Association produces 
munitions for the military. It is now involved 
in large scale conversion from military to 
civil production. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Munitions; SIC 
Code: 2353, 3431, 3534, 3552, 3559, 3563, 
3629, 3634, 3651, 3679, 7371, 7372, 7382 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 5,100; Date: 1993. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-28 



Alexsandr V. Zakharov, Director 
Sergei V. Sazonkin, Commercial Director 
Aleksandr G. Sergeyev, Chief Designer, 
Consumer Goods Department 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Munitions 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Computer 
programming services and prepackaged 
software, environmental controls, medical 
instruments, radio receivers, televisions 
(including the "Kvarts" black and white set), 
home audio equipment (such as the "Static" 
stereo system, the "Kvazar" cassette player, 
the "Forum" bass-booster amplifier, and 
other stereo cassette players), general 
purpose communications equipment, tape 
recorders, TEMP-1 portable tire-inflation 
compressor, pneumatic-hydraulic car jacks, 
automotive compressors, sanitation 
apparatus, household appliances (including 
"Stezhok" sewing machine, cutlery, fans, and 
other household implements), haberdashery 
articles, satellite television dishes, battery 
chargers, electric razors, curling irons, and 
electronic home security alarms. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS At an 

exhibition of medical products, Kalinin 
proposed the production of taxnonometers 
for experimental automatic pressure- 
measuring devices. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT 

Kalinin owns several buildings located along 

My 1996 



an adjacent riverfront and is considering 
converting them into an apartment-hotel 
complex to be owned by the facility. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

One of Kalinin's manufacturing facilities - 
located on its grounds - is a semi- 
independent privatized entity whose 
production is exclusively sold to Kalinin in 
exchange for manufacturing space. Almost 
all of the assembly components for Kalinin's 
civil product lines, including plastic molding, 
electric motors, and electronics, are built on- 
site. Production floor space totals about 
76,000 square meters. 



Enterprise name: KIROV PLANT JOINT 
STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionnernoye 
obshchestvo "Kirovskiy zavod," AO 
Kirovskiy zavod, Kirovskiy zavodProduction 
Association; Key Facilities: Kirovskiy 
mashinostroitelnyy i metallurgicheskiy zavod 
(Kirovskiy Znamya Oktyabr zavod, Kirov 
Plant), St. Petersburg;, Gorelovo; Transmash 
Plant, Tikhvin. 

ADDRESS 

198097, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Prospekt Stachek, 47 

187500, Tikhvin, Russia (Leningrad Oblast) 
Transmash Plant 

Tel: (011-7-812), 183-8434, 183-8001, 184- 
3553, 292-9558, 316-9558, 671-1933, 1-35- 
42 (Transmash Plant); Telex: 121416 
POWER SU, 121416 LADOGA, 322326 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-29 



DIZEL (Transmash Plant), Fax: (01 1-7-812) 
252-04-16; E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Kirov Plant 
Joint Stock Company is a major producer of 
tractors and steam turbines for both the 
military and civilian markets. It has also 
designed and produced tanks for the military. 
It is a vertically-integrated association that 
also produces its own steel, its own sheet 
metal, and its own forgings and stampings 
The main component of the Kirov Plant 
Production Association is the Kirov Plant 
proper, the largest and oldest industrial 
complex in St. Petersburg. Other 
components of the Kirov Plant Production 
Association include and the Transmash Plant 
in Tikhvin. The Kirov Plant ceased 
producing tanks in November 1991. It 
continues to produce turbines, tractors, 
construction machinery, and rolled steel. 
Tikhvin produces castings, as well as 
machinery, spare parts, and consumer goods. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Heavy vehicles, 
turbines; SIC: 3316, 3462,3511, 3519, 
3531, 3537; HS #: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 

EMPLOYMENT: 50,000; Date: 1991. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Pyotr G. Semenenko, President 
Aleksandr V. Kruglov, Director of 
International Relations Company, 
Yevgeny Sergeyevich Malyshev, 
General Director, Transmash Plant 

OWNERSHIP: Joint-stock company 
Employees acquired 75 percentofthe stock 
and 10 percent of the stock was sold to 

Job i°*> 



foreign investors. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1801, as the 
Putilov Works/Foundry. 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: T-80 
tanks, PION self-propelled artillery gun, 
turbines for naval surface vessels and 
submarines, silent reduction gears for 
submarines. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Turbines for 
electric power generation; circulating pumps 
for nuclear power stations; industrial and 
agricultural tractors ("KIROVETS"-K-700 
and K-701M); construction machinery, 
including bulldozers, cranes, front-end 
loaders, and canal digging machinery; 
automated packaging machinery for 
agriculture; machines for the mining industry, 
road construction, and the repair of oil wells 
and oil pipelines; consumer goods including 
kitchen appliances (juice pressers, meat 
grinders), window locks, and children's 
swings. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPMT. EMPLOYED 

Numerically-controlled machine tools. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Conversion 
activity includes large-scale production of 
household appliances and other consumer 
goods. An effort is underway to produce 
mini-tractors and attachments (K-20, using 
3 5 horsepower engines from Germany) for 
small farms. Kirov is beginning production 
of municipal service vehicles. It produces 
annually about 21,000 225- and 300-HP 
tractors, 600,000 meat grinders, and 400,000 
juice pressers. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: 

Employee housing, recreation centers, sport 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-30 



centers, a sanitarium, and a subsidiary 
agricultural farm. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Kirov has approached Ford, Volkswagen, 
and General Motors in an aggressive effort 
to obtain a Western partner for joint 
automobile production. An automotive 
joint-venture with Mitsubishi of Japan may 
already exist in facilities at Gorelovo that 
were built, but never used, for tank 
assembly. Production of small multi-purpose 
tractors through a joint venture has also been 
considered. Production of jeeps through a 
joint venture is also being considered. Kirov 
is also studying the possibility of wheelchair 
production. In 1993, Kirov entered into a 
joint venture with the German firm 
Landteknik AG of Schonebeck for 
production of "Maral" grain combines, a 
German design suitable for use in Russian 
fields. 



Enterprise name: KLIMOV PLANT 
SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION 
ENTERPRISE 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: NPP "Zavod 
imeni V. Ya. Klimova," Leningradskoye 
NPO imeni V. Ya. Klimova, Klimov Design 
Bureau, Klimov Corporation, Izotov Engine 
Design Bureau, Klimov Machine-Building 
Plant 

ADDRESS 

194100, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Kantemirovskaya Ulitsa, 1 

Tel: (01 1-7-812) 245-3366, 245-01 15, 245- 
4315; Telex: N/A; Fax: (01 1-7-812) 245- 

Julyl996 



4329; E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Founded by V 
Ya. Klimov, the design bureau moved to its 
present location after World War II. It was 
also known for a time as the Izotov Design 
Bureau after S.P. Izotov, chief designer 
following Klimov. After Izotov's death in 
1983 the design bureau returned to its 
original name. The bureau is co-located with 
its own experimental prototype plant, the 
Klimov Machine-Building Plant, and 
together they form the Klimov Scientific 
Production Association. Klimov engines are 
serially produced at the Krasnyy Oktyabr' 
Plant. In early 1992 the Klimov Design 
Bureau was for the first time referred to as 
the Klimov Corporation, suggesting it has 
been reorganized into a joint-stock company. 
The Klimov Enterprise is vigorously 
pursuing the export market and joint- 
ventures with Western aerospace companies. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Aircraft engines; 
SIC Code: 3724; HS #: N/A 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Engines 
for MiG-29 Fulcrum fighter aircraft and Mi- 
8, Mi-17, and Mi-24 military helicopters. 

CrVTL PRODUCT LINES Engines for the 

II- 114 civil transports; converted helicopter 
engines; machinery for producing footwear 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED 

Metallurgy and machining technology. The 
design bureau developed the capability to 
machine difficult-to-work metals such as 
cobalt-tungsten alloys using its own high- 
speed cutting tools. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Aggressively 
pursuing business arrangements with foreign 
aerospace companies to promote exports and 
develop joint-ventures. Includes contacts 
with Snecma France for joint development of 
a powerplant for new jet trainer for Russia; 
with China for the use of a Klimov derivative 
engine for use on Chinese transports; and 
with South Korea, for a ground-based power 
station. 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 3,492; Date: 1992. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Aleksandr A. Sarkisov, Director General 
Valentin V. Starovoytnikov, Chief Designer. 
Pyotr S. Izotov, Director of Marketing 
Gennady N. Yezhov, Dir. for Econ. and Fin. 
A. P. Listratov, Technical Director 

OWNERSHIP: Joint-stock company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1944 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT 

Maintained a sanitarium in the Crimea; 
health-care center on-site. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

The Klimov has an engine test facility in the 
Shuvalova District of St. Petersburg 
Klimov has an agreement with Snecma to 
prepare a technical proposal for a military 
trainer engine. Klimov is discussing an 
agreement with the Chinese to provide a 
derivative of Klimov's TV7-1 17 engine 
Klimov has formed a joint venture with 
South Korea to develop a 1.5-megawatt 
ground-based electrical power and heating 
station. Klimov has a two-part agreement 
with South Africa to define a new business 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Jul\ 



1-31 



aircraft within the framework of a 
consortium and to retrofit Klimov's RD-33 
engine on Western-built combat aircraft. It 
was announced in July, 1993, that Pratt & 
Whitney Canada and the Klimov Corporation 
had formed a joint-venture to develop and 
produce a range of small gas turbine engines 
(turboprop, turboshaft and turbofan) for civil 
aircraft in the CIS and other markets. 



Enterprise name: KRASNAYA ZARYA 
STATE PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Radio Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Vladimir K. Yevseyev, General Director 
Vladimir G. Musorin, 

Deputy Director General for Economics 
Aleksandr Y. Kukuy, Deputy Dir. General, 
Mikhail M. Lebedey, Deputy Dir. General, 
A.Makarov, Commercial Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 



LAST UPDATE: December 1995 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: Pre-World War II 



ALTERNATE NAMES 

Proizvodstvennoye obedineniye "Krasnaya 
Zarya", LNPO Krasnaya Zarya, NPO 
Krasnaya Zarya, Krasnaya Zarya Plant. Key 
facility: Delta Research Institute 

ADDRESS: 

194044, St.Petersburg, Russia 
B. Samsonevskiy Prospekt, 60 

Tel: (011-7-812) 245-3738, 245-3339, 245- 
8953, 245-1 172; Telex: 121592, Teletype: 
321306 TABLO; Fax: (011-7-812) 245- 
6450; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Krasnaya 
Zarya State Production Association is the 
largest producer of telecommunications 
equipment in Russia, specializing in the 
production of telephone equipment and 
exchanges. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Communications 
equipment; SIC Code: 3429, 3661, 3679, 
3825, 3949 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Telephone apparatus, secure 
communications systems. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Telephones 
and telephone equipment, automatic 
telephone exchanges, signalling apparatus, 
locks, automobile anti-theft devices, 
instruments for power supply control 
systems, soldering irons, fishing reels. 

KEY TECH. /EQUEPT. EMPLOYED : 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 
HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The current address, B. Samsonevskiy 
Prospekt, formerly was known as Prospekt 
Karla Marksa. Alternative addresses for 
Krasnaya Zarya are Kantemirovskaya Ulitsa 
4, 6, and 8. Kantemirovskaya Ulitsa 4 is also 
the address of the Scientific Research 
Institute of Electrotechnical Devices 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



July 1996 



1-32 



(NIIETU), at one time part of the Krasnaya 
Zarya association but separated from it in 
1992. Krasnaya Zarya, under the former 
Soviet Union, established a joint venture 
(1991) with Italiana Telecomunicazioni 
(ITALTEL) SPA., called Telezarya, to 
produce digital telephone exchanges in 
Russia. 



Enterprise name: KRASNAYA ZARYA 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
OF ELECTROTECHNICAL 
EQUIPMENT (NIIETU) 

LAST UPDATE: March 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Nauchno- 
issledovatelniy institut elektrotekhnicheskikh 
ustroystv 

ADDRESS: 

197342, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Kantemirovskaya, 4 

Tel: (011-7-812) 245-3738, 245-5069; 
Fax: (011-7-812) 245-6752; Teletype: 
122280 PRIZMA; Telex: N/A; E- Mail: N/A 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: 

Telecommunications equipment. 
FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Radio Industry 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Development of telecommunications 
equipment. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Automatic and 
semi-automatic telephone stations, 
automated special communications systems 
for transmitting data, equipment for 
operating loudspeaker systems, and 
switchboards. 

KEY TECH. /EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 
HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The Krasnaya Zarya Scientific Production 
Association was broken up in January 1992 
and NIIETU became independent. 



Enterprise name: 
KRASNOZNAMENETS STATE 
SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION 
ENTERPRISE 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALT. NAMES: NPO "Red Banner" 



APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 1,954; Date 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Oleg G. Myasnikov, Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned 
YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



ADDRESS: 

195043, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Chelyabinskaya Street, 95 

Tel: (011-7-812) 527-6057, 527-51 
(01 1-7-812) 527-3696;E-mail: N/A 



::. Fax 



GENERAL OVERVIEW: Production 
facility tor munitions equipment and ignition 

Julv lOOo 



1-33 



devices. 

PRODUCT SPECIALTY: Explosives and 
munitions for the coal, oil, gas and metal 
industries. 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of Machine Building. 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 3,000; Date: 1994. 



foreign firms. Potential diversification 
programs include production of insulation 
materials for residential and commercial 
housing construction, production of cinder 
blocks for house and cottage construction, 
production of wooden doors and window 
frames for housing construction and 
production of environmentally-safe batteries. 
The facility covers territory of 150 hectares, 
with roads for automobile and rail access, 
and has substantial warehouse facilities. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Nikolai Igorov, Director 
Alexander Shirshov, Vice Director 

OWNERSHIP: 100 percent state-owned. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1843 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 



Enterprise name: KRYLOV CENTRAL 
SCIENTD7IC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: TsNII imeni 
akademika A.N. Krylova, Krylov 
Shipbuilding Research Institute 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Munitions Equipment and Ignition Devices. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Construction 
Drills, Photo Lamps and Casings, Indoor 
Electric Heaters, Polyethylene and 
Computers. 



ADDRESS: 

196158 St. Petersburg, Russia 
Moskovskoye Shosse, 44 

Tel: (011-7-812) 291-9606, 291-9665; 
Telex: 121467 CNEPR SU; Fax: (011-7- 
812) 127-9595, 127-9632; E-mail: N/A 



KEY TECH. / EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Ignitions, Electronics, Bushing Presses, and 
Large Presses. 



GENERAL OVERVIEW A maritime 
research institute involved in hydrodynamic 
and testing of ship designs. 



CONVERSION PROJECTS: Production 
of environmentally-safe insulating material 
and batteries. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Red Banner is interested in partially 
privatizing its operations and has 
commenced negotiations with a number of 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



PRIMARY BUSINESS: Shipbuilding; SIC 

Code: 373; HS#: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 10,000; Date: 1975. 



1-34 



July 1996 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Vadim.Y. Spiro, First Deputy. Dir. General 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1894 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Performs 
testing of full-scale and model warship and 
submarine designs, both model testing and 
full-scale testing. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Testing of 
merchant ship designs. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Deep water and shallow water tow tanks; 
high speed tow tanks; basins for seakeeping, 
maneuverability and cavitation tests; ice 
model basin; cavitation basin; wind and 
cavitation tunnels; acoustic measurement 
tanks; tensile testing machines; fatigue and 
vibration testing machines; hydraulics and 
propulsion plant testing facilities; equipment 
and ranges for full scale ship tests. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS 

Underground nuclear power stations; nuclear 
power plant and ship design; acoustical and 
mechanical testing. 



Enterprise name: LENINETS HOLDING 
CONCERN, JOINT-STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Kontsern 
"Leninets," NPK Leninets, Leninets 
Scientific Production Concern, Leninets 
Central Scientific Production Association, 
NPO Leninets, Leninets Association, 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-35 



Leninets Holding Company. 

ADDRESS 

196066 St. Petersburg, Russia 
Moskovskiy Prospekt, 212 

Tel: (011-7-812)293-6878,291-8141; 
Telex: 122246 RADUGA, 121377; Fax: 
(011-7-812), 299-9041, 291-8138; E-mail: 

N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW Leninets 
produces a variety of airborne radars and 
other radioelectronic equipment as well as a 
variety of consumer goods. The huge 
concern includes 16 factories, 10 research 
organizations, and 50 small enterprises. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Aeronautical 
Radars; SIC Code: 3812; HS#: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Radio Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Anatoly A. Turchak, President/Dir. General. 
Leonid G. Golovach, Vice President 
Ramutis Y. Bagdonas, Vice President 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1974 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Aircraft 
radars; aircraft computers. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Aircraft radars 

for a variety of uses (weather and navigation, 

land survey, search and rescue) household 
appliances (refrigerators, razors, kitchen 
appliances); automotive electronics, radio 

Julv loot, 



receiving and sound reproduction equipment; 
and satellite television equipment; toys. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Diagnostic, 
preventive and rehabilitative medical equipt; 
household appliances. Leninets organized 
the Konvent Concern to create the Industrial 
Engineering Center for Conversion in the 
Leningrad Region. Leninets is involved in a 
joint venture with the Gillette Company to 
build a factory to produce shaving products. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT The 

company has an agro-industrial complex, an 
education center, hotels, and recreation 
centers. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

In 1991 about 35 percent of Leninets 1 output 
was military, with plans to reduce that share 
to 25 percent. An experimental plant 
belonging to Leninets is located in Gatchina. 
In 1991, the company worked with the 
Western auditing company Coopers and 
Lybrand tochange to a joint-stock company. 



Enterprise name: LENINGRAD 
OPTICAL-MECHANICAL 
ASSOCIATION (LOMO) 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: LOMO Joint, AO 
LOMO, St. Petersburg Optical Mechanical 
Association, Leningradskoye Optiko- 
mekhanicheskoye obedineniye imeni V.I. 
Lenina (LOMO). 

ADDRESS: 

194044, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Chugunnaya Ulitsa, 20 



Tel: (011-7-812) 242-5001, 248-5201, 248- 
5009; Telex:321421 LOMO Teletype: 
321421 OKULYAR; Fax: (011-7-812) 542- 
1839, 542-1065, 542-2269, 542-5322; E- 
mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW This association 
is the oldest and largest producer of optics in 
Russia and produces a vast array of world- 
class optical systems for the military and the 
civil economy, including high-precision 
optical-mechanical instruments, lenses, 
mirrors, prisms, and diffraction gratings. 
LOMO consists mainly of a central design 
bureau and four production plants: the 
former State Optical Mechanical Plant 
(GOMZ) at 20 Chugunnaya Ulitsa; the 
former Progress Plant on Mikhaylovskava 
Ulitsa; the branch plant on Pridorozhnaya 
Alleya; and the Kinap Motion Picture 
Equipment Plant at 8 Zhukova Ulitsa. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Optical 
instruments & lenses; SIC Code: 3827; HS#: 
N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 20,000; Date: 1992 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Iliya Isofirovich Klebanov, General Director 
Nikolay Yu. Shustov, Technical Director 
Arkady S. Kobitsky, Marketing Director . 
Sergey V. Shnurov, Director of LOMO 
Foreign Trade Company 
Valeriy Krukov, Director (economics) 

OWNERSHIP: Joint-stock, open-type 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: Association 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-36 



July 1996 



founded 1964; the State Optical Mechanical 
Plant (GOMZ) established in the 1930s. 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Infrared 
homing heads; laser rangefinders; naval 
detection equipment; periscopes; gun sights. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Microscopes; 
cameras; precision measuring instruments; 
spectrometers; lenses for TV cameras; 
medical equipment; fiber optic endoscopes; 
large special purpose optical systems; other 
optical-mechanical equipment; astronomical 
equipment; telescopes; studio sound 
technological equipment and amplifiers. 

KEY TECH. /EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Industrial robots, including die-stamping 
robots and cold stamping robots; a flexible 
production module; diamond cutting tools; 
aluminum alloys die-casting machines; plastic 
molding; production of cutting and 
measuring tools. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Joint venture 
with a U.S. company to build analytic 
spectrometers. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

LOMO was one of the founders in 1990 of 
the Leningrad Business Forum, an 
association for foreign economic 
cooperation. 



Enterprise name: LENINGRAD 
SEVERNYY ZAVOD PRODUCTION 
ASSOCIATION 



ALTERNATE NAMES: PO Leningradskiy 
Severnyy zavod 

ADDRESS 

197228, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Kolomyazhskiy Prospekt, 1 

Tel: (011-7-812) 246-19-65; Telex: N/A; 
Fax: (01 1-7-812) 394-1 1-79, 293-74-26 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Severnyy 
Plant Production Association is in transition 
from missile production to the production of 
civil products. Since the 1960's Severnyy 
has produced surface-to-air missiles. Earlier 
it had produced fixed wing aircraft and 
helicopters. Currently, the association 
produces a variety of civil products including 
enameling machines, metal furniture, and 
other consumer goods. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Guided Missiles; 
SIC Code: 2298, 2399, 2514, 2522, 3421, 
3444, 3465, 3469, 3631, 3914, 3949 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 10,000; Date: 1968. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

German Gordymova, Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED Pre-W odd War D 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Surfece- 

to-air missiles. 



LAST UPDATE: December 1995 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



CIVIL PRODUCT LINES 1 So Binding 

machines, metal & enamel-coated tableware. 

July 19! 



1-37 



metal furniture, household lighting fixtures, 
kitchen gas stoves, fishing accessories, 
ferrous & non-ferrous scrap metals. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Titanium welding 

CONVERSION PROJECTS N/A 
HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The member plants of the Severnyy Zavod 
Production Association are the two 
manufacturing facilities, located several miles 
apart in St. Petersburg, that for many years 
functioned as the Severnyy Plant. 



Enterprise name: MAGNETON JOINT 
STOCK COMPANY 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Electronics Industry 

APPROX. EMPLOYMENT: Total: 1 ,500; 
Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Anatoly Firsenkov, Director 

Lyubov Ivanova, Chief financial officer 

Vladimir M. Ishutkin, Chief Engineer 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company. 
Twenty percent of the shares are state- 
owned, 51% are owned by the employees, 
and 29% are owned by private investment 
companies. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1945 

KEY TECH./EQPT. EMPLOYED: N/A 



LAST UPDATE: March 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionnernoye 
obshchestuo "Magneton", AO Magneton 

ADDRESS: 

194223, Russia, St. Petersburg, 
Ulitsa Kurchatova, 9 

Tel: (011-7-812) 247-5551, 247-5589, 
Fax: (01 1-7-812) 552-0305; E- Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Formerly part of 
the Ferrite Production Association, 
Magneton is a major producer of ferrites and 
related products such as magnets. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electronics 

PRODUCT SPECIALTY: Components 
made from strontium and barium ferrites. 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-38 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Ferrite 
magnetic materials and microwave devices 
based on these materials, as well as radar 
absorbing materials. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: Dynamic 
heads for loudspeakers, mini TVs, magnetic 
locks for furniture, TV beam control systems 
and transformers, HF choking coils for video 
and TV equipment, radio components, 
magnets (isotopic and anisotropic) from 
strontium and barium ferrites. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Production of 
magnets from ferrites; SIC Code: 3264 3651, 
3677, 3695, 3826 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Design and 
production of consumer electronics. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

July 1996 



OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The facility relies on 120 suppliers for its 
production. 



Enterprise name: NEVSKOYE 
PLANNING AND DESIGN BUREAU 
JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAME: PKB Nevskoye, 
Nevsky Design Bureau 

ADDRESS: 

199106, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Galerny Proezd, 3 

Tel: (011-7-812) 356-0566, 352-0289, 352- 
0364; Fax: (011-7-812) 352-0740; E-mail: 

N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Nevskoye 
Planning and Design bureau is Russia's 
primary designer of large surface vessels. 

PRODUCT SPECIALTY: Design of large 
naval vessels. 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1931 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Design 
of heavy aircraft carriers & large landing 
ships. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Tankers, bulk 
cargo carriers and car carriers transporting 
ships. 

KEY TECH. /EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Nevskoye is the oldest intitution for naval 
architecture in Russia. 



Enterprise name: OBUKHOV STATE 
PLANT 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Zavod 
Obukhovskiy, Bolshevik Plant Production 
Association, PO Zavod Bolshevik 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry. 

APPROX. EMPLOYMENT: 603; Date 
1994 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Lev V. Belov, Director 
Yury M. Varfolomeyev, Deputy Director 
Boris Y. Akimenko, Deputy Director for 
Economics 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company. 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-39 



ADDRESS 

193012, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Obukhovskiy Oborony Prospekt, 120 
Obukhovskiy Plant Production Association 

Tel: (011-7-812) 267-9929, 267-9573. 267- 
9523, 267-9860; 262-09-65 (General 
Director); 267-96-40 (Chief Engineer); 
Telex: 121345 PTB SU KOMPLEX. 
321067; Fax: (011-7-812)262-4277; 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Obukfaov 

State Plant specializes in the fields of 
metallurgy and heavy machine building and k> 

Jim 



an established producer of missile launching 
equipment and naval guns. The plant was 
founded in 1863 by Russian metallurgist 
Pavel Obukhov, who originated the use of 
cast steel for the manufacture of cannon 
barrels. The Obukhov plant was the site of 
the "Obukhov Defense of 1901," where 
workers clashed with Tsarist forces. The 
plant changed its name in 1992 from the 
Bolshevik Plant back to its original name, 
Obukhov. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Missile launchers, 
artillery; SIC Code: 3325, 3341, 3366, 3369, 
3523, 3533, 3547, 3556, 3589, 3663, 3842 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN .: 

Ministry of General Machine-Building 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 10,000; Date: 1993. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Anatoliy F. Vashenko, General Director 
Alexander B. Poretskiy, Chief Engineer 
Valeriy S. Pyshkin, Chief, 
Foreign Economic Relations Department 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 



cameras, gas and oil extraction equipment. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Open-hearth furnaces, hammer forging and 
pressing equipment (up to 3200 ton 
capacity), equipment to manufacture cog 
wheels, vertical electroplating tanks (up to 
10 meter capacity), numerically controlled 
metal lathes. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Obukhov is 
developing a pipe foundry and rolling mill 
complex. The plant produces wheelchairs 
for the foreign and domestic markets with a 
United States company, which supplied 
modern production equipment and training. 
Obukhov is working with another US firm to 
produce oil and gas extraction equipment. 
Also, Obukhov has a licensing agreement to 
assemble irons for the Italian appliance firm 
"Delonghi" and is the largest producer of 
household irons in Russia. Obukhov also has 
converted to the production of "Positron" 
television sets and "Lomo" cameras. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT The 

plant has a hospital, a nursery school, a 
sports complex, and two summer resort 
facilities in southern Russia. 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1863 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Missile 
launching equipment; ICBM missile silos; 
ground equipment associated with missile 
systems; submarine missile launch tubes; 
naval guns; submarine antenna arrays. 



OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

Obukhov is attempting to convert to 
additional civilian production, including 
agricultural equipment, medical sterilization 
equipment, and machinery for environmental 
cleanups, the latter with potential investment 
by the Finnish government. 



CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Ferrous and 
non-ferrous castings used in the 
electrotechnical, chemical and shipbuilding 
industries, fork-lift trucks, wheelchairs, irons 
and other home appliances, television sets, 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



July 1996 



1-40 



Enterprise name: OKEANPRIBOR 
SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION 
ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: "Okeanpribor". 
Nauchno-proizvodstvennoye, NPO 
Okeanpribor 

ADDRESS: 

197376, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Chkolovsky Prospect, 46 

Tel: (011-7-812)232-2105 or 235-2551, 
Fax: (011-7-812) 235-3991, E- mail: N/A; 
Telex: 121345 PTB; Teletype: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The 

Okeanpribor Scientific Production 
Association is a major research and 
production facility engaged in the 
development of hydroacoustic systems and 
equipment for both submarines and 
commercial vessels. 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Hydroacoustic systems and equipment, 
antennas and transformers for submarines 
and naval vessels. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Audio 
equipment and magnetic discs. 

PRIMARY TECH. AND EQUIPMENT: 

Hydroacoustic technology 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Okeanpribor states that all production for the 
military is dual purpose and has commercial 
applications. They are in the early stage of 
conversion and would like to work with 
foreign partners. 



Enterprise name: PETROZAVOD 
JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 



PRIMARY BUSINESS: Hydroacoustic 
systems 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

10,000; Date: 1994 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Dmitry D. Mironov, Director 

Alia N. Kalyaeva, Foreign Relations Dept 

OWNERSHIP: Joint-stock company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionnernoye 
obshchestvo "Petrozavod", AO Petrozavod. 
Leningradskiy Petrozavod, Okha 
(Okhtenskiy) Shipyard, Okhtinskaya Verf 

ADDRESS 

195272, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Krasnogvardeyskaya ploshchad (Square). 2 

Tel: (011-7-812)224-1260, 224-1226, 224- 

90-01, 224-1779; Telex: 121396 CEDR1 
SU; Teletype: 121329 FERMA; Fax (011-7- 

812) 224-2249, 293-45-15, E-Mail N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW Petrozavod one 
of the oldest shipbuilding establishments in 

Russia, lost its building ways in the 1970s 

Juh 19! 



1-41 



and was converted to manufacture machine 
tools and components for use in other 
shipyards. It was founded at the junction of 
the Okhta and Neva rivers in 1721 as a 
roofing shingle works, a settlement for serfs 
working at the Main Admiralty Yard, and a 
small shipyard. It was enlarged in 1806 and, 
as the Okhta Admiralty, built sailing frigates 
and ships of the time. It was leased to 
private shipbuilders between 1872 and 1913 
for construction of smaller ships, and in 1931 
it became a specialist in the construction of 
tugs. During the 1950s and 1960s it built 63 
oceangoing tugs of the "Goliat" class 
(known in the West as the Okhtenskiy class) 
and harbour tugs of the "Peredovik" 
(Sidehole) and "Prometey" (Saka) classes. 
After the yard was rebuilt in the late 1970s it 
has manufactured sophisticated shipbuilding 
production line equipment. Early projects 
include mechanization of the assembly and 
welding production lines at the Vyborg 
Shipbuilding Plant and the construction of a 
unit for assembly and welding of large hull 
sections at the Zhdanov Shipbuilding Plant in 
Leningrad. 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Leonard S. Shelest, General Director 
M. Pavlov, Deputy Director 
Victor N. Ignatiev, Chief Engineer 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1721 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Shipbuilding machinery, speed boats. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: Machine tools, 
welding equipment, sheet forming equipt, 
metalworking and woodworking machinery, 
welded metal blocks. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Metal cut computer control equipment, 
casting factory, cutting workshop, thermal- 
processing, galvanic protection products, 
assembly welding workshop, shell assembly. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: 

Development of small capacity shipbuilding 
and stainless steel kitchen utensils. 



PRODUCT SPECIALTY: Small tonnage 
shipbuilding, wooden shipbuilding, welding 
equipment, semi-automatic machines, 
shipbuilding machinery, wood working and 
metal processing equipment. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Shipbuilding 
machinery; SIC Code: 3441, 443, 3469, 
3541, 3544, 3546, 3548, 3553 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN.: 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Petrozavod is associated with the Ritm 
Scientific Production Association of St. 
Petersburg. 



Enterprise name: POISK SCIENTIFIC 
RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

LAST UPDATE: March 1996 



APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 570: Date: 1995 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



ALTERNATE NAMES: Nauchnyy 
issledovatelniy institut "Poisk", Nil Poisk, 
Poisk State Enterprise 



July 1996 



1-42 



ADDRESS: 

195009, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Mikhailova Street, 17 

Tel: (011-7-812) 531-89-72; Telex: N/A; 
Teletype: 122043 Mikron; Fax: (011-7-812) 
542-1214; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Poisk 
Scientific Research Institute specializes in 
electronic management systems. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Development of 
electronic management systems; SIC Code: 
3429, 3669 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 1,000; Date: December 1995. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Leonid S. Egorenkov, Director 
VladmirF. Vasilyev, Chief Engineer; 
Vyacheslav A.Lukin, Deputy Director for 
Commercial Issues 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1930 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Management systems for artillery shells, 
mortars, aviation bombs and explosive 
devices. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Explosive 
devices for mining and coal industries, 
consumer goods (Electronic locks, security 
systems). 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
HDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



EMPLOYED: Design facilities for 
electronic management systems. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS The institute 
has plans to create a company that will 
manufacture windowframes. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFO N/A 



Enterprise name: POPOV RESEARCH 
AND DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE 
FOR RADIO BROADCASTING AND 
ACOUSTICS (NHRPA) 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAME: Joint Stock 
Company NHRPA 

ADDRESS: 

197376, Russia, St. Petersburg, 
Naberezhnaya Reki Krestovki, 3 

Tel: (812) 234-2945, 234-001 1, Fax: (812) 
234-5722; Telex: N/A; E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The AS 

Popov Institute was founded in 1923 and 
remains the biggest scientific center in the 
field of radio broadcasting, electro-acoustics, 
professional audio and studio equipment It 
is a part of the State Science and Production 
Enterprise "Informakustika". 

PRODUCT SPECIALTY: Complexes for 
TV reporters, consumer radio reception and 
acoustics equipment, sound amplifying 
equipment (household) and studio sound 
equipment. 



Juh 



1-43 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of Communications Equipment 
Industry. 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 500 

employees; Date: December 1995. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Dr. Alexander E. Denin, Director 

OWNERSHIP: Privatized joint stock 
company (open type). 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1923 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: High 
sensitive receivers and listening devices, 
information security systems. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: Loud 
speakers, studio monitors, public address 
systems, studio mixing consoles, sound 
processors, digital audio workstations, 
broadcasting systems, fixed, portable, radio 
and car-radio tape recorders, CD players, 
audio amplifiers, wireless microphones, 
sound reinforcement systems, reverberators, 
sound effect processors, information security 
systems, test and measuring equipment and 
marketing studies for audio systems. 

PRIMARY TECH. AND EQUIPMENT: 

The institute is equipped with two anechoic 
chambers (the biggest in Europe), 
electronically shielded rooms, test equipment 
for certification of production prototypes, 
and listening rooms meeting EEC standards. 



OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION : 

The institute's scientific facilities are 
comprised of four buildings with a total of 
10,000 sq. meters. Production facilities total 
an additional 2,000 sq. meters. A new 
37,000 sq. meter production plant previously 
under construction is at a standstill. 



Enterprise name: POZITRON JOINT 
STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionnernoye 
obshchestvo "Poztron",NPO Pozitron, 
Leningrad Electronics Production 
Association, Positron Association 

ADDRESS: 

194223 St. Petersburg, Russia 
Kurchatov Ulitsa, 1 

Telephone : (011-7-812) 552-1617, 552- 
6016: Telex: 121452 VITA SU; Fax: (011- 
7-812), 552-6081, 552-0903; 
E-mail: root @ positron.spb.su 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Pozitron is the 
leading former Soviet production facility for 
the manufacture of resistors, capacitors and 
television components. Pozitron produces a 
variety of military equipment, including 
electronic components and tensile 
condensers for missiles. It is composed of 
several enterprises, a research institute, and a 
design bureau. 



CONVERSION PROJECTS: The 

institute proposes working with foreign firms 
on production of loudspeakers and other 
consumer electronic products, distribution 
and repair services. 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-44 



PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electronic 
components, televisions, VCRs; SIC Code: 
3629, 3651; HS#: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN.: 

July 1996 



Ministry of the Electronics Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 500; Date: December 1995. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Yuriy I. Blokhin, General Manager 
Alexander V. Lanskov, Manager 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1971 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Integrated circuits; multilayer chip 
capacitors; semiconductors for research; 
thermal detectors; sensors/potentiometers; 
reverse engineering of Japanese and Western 
electronic equipment; ceramic capacitors; 
tantalum capacitors. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Television sets 
(Electronika and Colorstar brands); VCRs; 
resistors and capacitors; laboratory 
equipment and medical instruments; 
computers; tools; bearings; abrasive 
materials; Christmas tree decorations; office 
equipment; film. 

KEY TECH. /EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Electronic component production equipment; 
diamond lathe; clean room. For more 
information, see individual facility 
descriptions below. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Exploring 
research and development of tantalum 
condensers for televisions; video equipment; 
machining of metals; and ceramics. Pozitron 
manufactured 90,000 televisions in 1990, 
exporting half to Western Europe. Plans in 
1990 called for expanding television 
production to 2 million sets per year. 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-45 



Pozitron has also been emphasizing 
consumer goods since 1985. In March 1992, 
Pozitron's Vidikond Plant opened video 
assembly and packing plant as part of joint 
venture with Korea Daewoo Corporation. 
They plan to assemble/produce 200,000 
annually. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Following privatization, Pozitron no longer 
includes the Viton Plant, Kulon Plant, Lakon 
Plant, Mezon Plant, Rekond Plant and the 
Gerekond Institute which have all seceded 
from Pozitron and currently act as 
independent companies. 



Enterprise name: PRIMORSK 
SCIENTIFIC TECHNICAL CENTER 
OF THE RUSSIAN SPACE 
CORPORATION ENERGIYA 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Primorskiy filial 
NPO Energiya imeni akademika S.P. 
Koroleva 

ADDRESS 

188910, Primorsk, Russia 
(Leningrad Oblast) 
Malodetskoselskiy Prospekt, 32 

Tel: (011-7-81278) 75-737, 75-331 (General 
Director), 78-559 (Tech. Manager). Telex 
N/A; Fax: (01 1-7-81278) 75-443 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: A long time 

participant in the development & testing of 
rocket engines for missiles & space launch 

Jufa 19! 



vehicles, Primorsk is now exclusively 
involved in space programs. It is part of the 
Russian Space Corpn. Energiya, Russia's 
premier developer of space technology. 
Primorsk specializes in rocket propulsion 
technology developed by Energiya. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Rocket 
propulsion; SIC Code: 2821, 2891, 3423, 
3556, 3569, 3842 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of General Machine-Building 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 700; Date: December 1995. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Sergey K. Petrov, Director 

Yury V. Sidel'nikov, First Deputy Director 

Alexander Zilitinchevich, Chief Designer 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned: a subsidary of 
the Russian Space Corporation Energiya. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Assembly & testing of rocket & aircraft 
engines and fuel. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Prosthetic 
devices; food processing equipment. 

KEY TECH. /EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Primorsk has advanced facilities for the 
assembly and testing of rocket and aircraft 
engines. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS A prototype 
of the Vulcan cleaner has been developed at 
Primorsk based on the cleaning system used 
for rocket engines and fuels. This small 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-46 



device is designed to clean pollutants such as 
waste water, industrial emissions, and toxic 
wastes. Fixed and truck-mounted versions 
of the Vulcan cleaner are planned. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Primorsk is seeking joint ventures with 
Finland and Western countries to develop 
civilian products. 



Enterprise name: PROMETEY 
CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 
INSTITUTE OF STRUCTURAL 
MATERIALS 

LAST UPDATE: March 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES TsNII 
konstruktsionnykh materialov (TsNIIKM) 
"Prometey," TsNIIMS, Central Research 
Institute of Construction Materials 

ADDRESS: 

193167 St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Shpalernaya, 49 

Tel: (011-7-812) 274-3796, 274-2620; 
Telex: 322147 ALFA; Fax: (011-7-812) 
274-1707; E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Prometey 
Institute develops and produces advanced 
alloys and conducts research in metallurgical 
and welding techniques. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Metallurgy R&D; 
SIC Code: 2813, 2819, 3341, 3356, 3363, 
3364, 3429, 3443, 3498, 3499, 3533, 3548, 
3561, 3569, 3599, 3823, 3841, 3842, 3949; 
HS#: N/A 

July 1996 






FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 1,700; Date: 1994 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Igor Vasilievich Gorynin, Director 
Oleg G. Sokolv, First Deputy Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 



other alloys, including vacuum-arc and 
electroslag capabilities; process for rolling 
beryllium between two sheets of steel; argon 
gas-flow meter for welding; argon-filled 
chamber to work on titanium submarine 
hulls; composites; coatings; plastics; 
corrosion research-galvanic protection using 
an external current and special paint; porous 
amorphous materials able to withstand high 
temperature used as flexible radar absorption 
material. 



YEAR ESTABLISHED 1939 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Heavy 
armor research and development; 
metallurgical research for shipbuilding; 
defectoscope quality control measures; 
titanium-alloy for submarine hull 
construction; non-magnetic steels and alloys 
for anti-submarine vessels; high-strength hull, 
steels, advanced propulsion system materials, 
aluminum alloys; titanium alloys for 
machinery system applications. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Titanium 
alloys; aluminum-magnesium alloy with 
"memory" properties; large volume pressure 
containers made of wound polymer or 
carbon fibers; catalytic converters containing 
titanium fuel; double-layer steel with 
corrosion protection for cold weather 
environments (ice breaker sterns); corrosion 
resistant pipes for long distance heating 
systems; welding electrodes; titanium 
hydrofoils; technology for joining steel and 
aluminum and steel and titanium; testing 
systems to detect intercrystalline corosion 
(used in nuclear industries), and anode 
protection for ships. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED 

Processes for working with titanium and 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-47 



CONVERSION PROJECTS Use of 

titanium-alloy in off-shore drilling rigs, hulls 
and props for commercial ships, surgical 
instruments, filters, pumps, tanks, and sports 
equipment. Commercial applications for 
amorphous metal alloys with fine grains 
include use in magnetic and electromagnetic 
components. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

Prometey has a branch facility located at a 
shipyard in Severodvinsk, as well as a 
building in suburb of Gatchina in Leningrad. 
Prometey also has underground facilities: a 
main one beneath Aleksandr Nevskiy 
Monastery Museum and another in the area 
between Sinopskaya Naberezhnaya and 
Ulitsa Krasnovo Tekstil'shchika, possibly 
contiguous with Nevskiy complex. 



Enterprise name: PYROMETER JOINT 
STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Leningradskiv 
zavod "Pirometr" 

ADDRESS 

197061, St Petersburg. Russia 

Julv lo*> 



Ulitsa Skorokhodova, 16 



devices. 



Tel: (011-7-812) 238-7245, Telex: 121687 
ARTEK; Teletype: 321384 ARTEK; Fax: 
(011-7-812) 238-8306; E-mail: N/A. 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Pyrometer 
makes many types of electronic products 
with uses in a wide range of applications. It 
was formerly part of the Elektroavtomatika 
Scientific Production Association. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electronics; SIC 

Code: 3542, 3572, 3651, 3661, 3663, 3679, 
3699, 3823, 3829, 3843, 3845; HS#: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN.: 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 4,000. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Sergey D. Bodrunov, President 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company, open 
type 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1920s 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Various 
military electronic components including 
infrared electronics and electronic warning 
signaling equipment. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Pyrometric 
instrumentation for heavy metal industry, 
ultrasonic technologies, tape recorders, 
electronic switches, telephonic apparatus, 
micromotors. 

KEY TECH./EQUEPT. EMPLOYED: 

Brightness and spectrographs measurement 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-48 



CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 



OTHER RELEVANT INFO. : N/A 



Enterprise name: RADAR SCIENTIFIC 
RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

LAST UPDATE: March 1996 

ALT. NAMES: Nil Radar, Radar MMS 
Company 

ADDRESS: 

198095, St. Petersburg, Russia 

Promyshlennaya Ulitsa, 19 

Tel: (011-7-812) 186-3310 

Fax: (011-7-812) 186-4505; E-Mail: N/A 

Radar MMS Co., (medical equipment) 

197349, St. Petersburg, Russia 

37 Novo selko vskay 

Tel: (011-7-812) 393-9600, 393-3403 

Fax: (011-7-812)394-4000 

Moscow: Tel. (011-7-095) 925-1013 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Radar 
Scientific Research Iinstitute designs and 
develops ship radars and surveillance 
systems. It is a part of the Scientific and 
Production Association Ravenstvo. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: radars 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROX. EMPLOYMENT : Total 270; 

July 1996 



Date: 1995. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Boris Nikanorovich Astashov, Director, 
Georgy Antsev, Gen. Director, Radar MMS 
(Medical equipt.& software development) 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned 



Tel: (011-7-812) 213-9604, 213-6140; Fax : 
(011-7-812) 218-7426; Telex: 321259 
COLOR RU; E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Raduga 
Joint Stock Company is a major producer of 
color TV sets, marine telecommunications 
equipment and household electronics. 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Military 
radars and surveillance mechanisms 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Civilian radars 
and radarscopes, medical equipment for 
emmergency use. 

KEY TECH. / EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : 

Electronics, radar technology 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Civilian 
radars, medical equipment for use in 
ambulances and helicopters. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

N/A 



Enterprise name: RADUGA JOINT 
STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: March 1996 

ALTERNATE NAME: Raduga Electronics 
Plant, Kozitsky Prodn. Assn., PO Kozitskiy 

ADDRESS: 

199161, Russia, St. Petersburg, 
Vasilaevsky Island, 5 Liniya, 70 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-49 



PRIMARY BUSINESS: 

Telecommunications equipment 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Communication Equipment 
Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 4,000; Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Nikolay G. Baranov, Director 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company. 
Employees hold 42% of the stock, while 2 
private firms own 26% of the stock. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Telecommunications equipment for naval 
vessels. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Color 
televisions, amplifiers, security systems, 
portable radio stations. 

KEY TECH. / EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The company has a joint venture with a 

.Uih iooo 



Norwegian company for the manufacture of 
consumer goods. The company is interested 
in modernizing its equipment in an effort to 
focus on the manufacture of radio and 
electronic consumer goods. 



Enterprise name: RAVENSTVO 
PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: March 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Proizvodst 
vennoye obyedineniye "Ravenstvo", PO 
Ravenstvo 

ADDRESS: 

198099, Russia, St. Petersburg, 
Ulitsa Promyshlennaya, 19 

Tel: (011-7-812) 186-8460, 186-1860 (Gen. 
Dir.), 186-2406 Ravenstvo-Servis), Fax : 
(011-7-812) 186-4505; Telex: n/a; Teletype: 
321829 LYUKS; E- Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Ravenstvo is a 
mid-size company whose primary product 
has been ship radars and control systems. It 
is now expanding its production to 
commercial products in the oil and gas, 
mining and electronics industries. It includes 
the Radar Scientific Research Institute and 
the Ravenstvo-Servis State Enterprise. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Ship radars 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 2800 employees; Date: 1994 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Yury V. Nikandrov, General Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1945 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Ship 
radars, electronic components and control 
systems. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: Gas pipeline 
pump control systems, units for diamond, 
special purpose operator consoles, metro 
counters, electric lighters, commercial 
hamburger-making equipment, medical 
equipment, ecological devices, and radio 
receivers. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. : N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: none 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

N/A 



Enterprise name: REDAN JOINT 
STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: March 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionnernoye 
obshchestvo "Redan", AO Redan, Redan 
Central Design Bureau 

ADDRESS: 

197374, St. Petersburg Russia, 
Primorsky Prospect, 46 

Tel: (011-7-812) 239-4000, 239-2159, 239- 
1891; Fax: (011-7-812) 239-3123; Telex: 

July 1996 



1-50 



N/A; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Redan Joint 
Stock Company is a relatively small producer 
of boats and equipment for naval and 
commercial uses, particularly patrol and 
rescue operations. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Special purpose 
boats. 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROX. EMPLOYMENT: Total 356; 
Date: 1994 



The controlling block of stock is held by the 
multi-national oil company "Hermes- Soyuz" 
in Moscow. A large block of stock is held 
by the Industrial Construction Bank 
(Moscow & St. Petersburg). 



Enterprise name: RUBIN CENTRAL 
MARINE DESIGN BUREAU 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: TsKBMT Rubin, 
Rubin Central Maritime Design Bureau, 
TsKB Rubin, Rubin Central Design Bureau 
for Maritime Engineering 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Stanislav P. Abramov, General Director, 
Yakov Y. Lebedev, Design Bur. Director, 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company, open 
type. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Patrol 
boats and rescue vessels. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Pleasure 
motor-boats, hydrological equipment, 
anchors, lifeboats, deck machinery for ships 
and model ships for hobbyists. 

KEY TECH. / EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Construction 
of passenger craft and yachts. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

J.S. Department of Commerce 

IDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-51 



ADDRESS: 

191126 St. Petersburg, Russia 

Ulitsa Marata, 90 

Tel: (011-7-812)210-1705, 113-5132, 

314-0373, 314-3769; telex: 121455 NEPT 

SU; Teletype: 121091 NEPTUN; Fax: (011- 

7-812) 164-3749, 112-4064; E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Rubin Central 
specializes in submarine and other 
underwater technologies, but has suffered a 
sharp cutback in orders. Design bureau 
officials are trying to compensate with work 
on civilian projects. Civil work has 
reportedly increased from 10 percent in 1987 
to 35 percent, mainly for the domestic oil. 
gas and fishing industries. In 1993. Rubin 
exhibited a model of a 30,000 ton 
underwater supertanker for use in exploiting 
oil and gas fields off* Russia's Artie coast 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Shipbuilding. SIC 
code: 373; HS# N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

Julv 1996 



APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 2,500; Date: 1987. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Igor D. Spasskiy, General Director 
Sergey A. Komorov, Deputy Gen. Director, 
Nikolay Nosov, Deputy Director, 
Gennadiy B. Sorokin, 
Head of Marketing Export, Project Neptun, 
Vladimir Barantsev, Chief Designer 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Submarine designs. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Equipment for 
producing glue, gelatin, dry foods, coffee. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Tourist 
submarines; portable power stations; 
underground nuclear power stations; arctic 
drilling platorms; underwater tankers; fast 
food enterprises; health spas; plastic models 
of submarines. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 



Enterprise name: RUSSIAN 
INSTITUTE OF HIGH-POWERED 
RADIO BUILDING 

LAST UPDATE: March 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Rossiskiy institut 
moshnogo radiostroyeniye, NPO RIMR, Nil 
Kominterna 

ADDRESS: 

199161, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Vasilievsky Island, 1 1 Liniya, 66 

Tel: (01 1-7-812), 213-0647; Fax: (01 1-7- 
812) 213-0625; Telex: N/A; Teletype: 
121216 URAN; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Komintern 
institute specializing in the design of radio 
transmitters for military and civil 
applications. It has affiliates in Luga, 
Krasnyy Bor, and Voyevoko. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Radio 
communications equipment 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Communications Equipment 
Industry. 



OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The commercial arm of Rubin's Export 
Project Neptun, which is located at the 
neighboring Neptun Hotel & Business 
Center. Information on Export 
ProjectNeptun: Address: Obvodny Canal, 
939, 191126, St. Petersburg, Russia; Tel: 
314-3769; telex: 121455; Telefax: 1643749; 
its projects include export of diesel 
submarines. 



APPROX. EMPLOYMENT: Total: 70; 
Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Boris I. Zolotov, Director 

Vladimir F. Sharayev, Deputy Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1911 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-52 



July 1996 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Radio 
communication systems. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Broadcast 
antennas, medical equipment, radio and TV 
transmitters of small and medium output, and 
radio systems for charged particle 
accelerators. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 



tons. The shipyard is part of the Severnaya 
Verf Production Association, which includes 
an electrodes factory with a capacity of 
20,000 tons annually and a furniture factory. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Shipbuilding; SIC 
Code: 373; HS#: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 7,300; Date: 1992 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 



OTHER RELEVANT INFO. : N/A 



Enterprise name: SEVERNAYA VERF 
SHIPBUILDING PLANT 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Yuriy Lvovich Bokov, Director 

OWNERSHIP: The enterprise has 
privatized and is now a joint stock co. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED Early 1900s 



LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Sudostroitelnyy 
zavod "Severnaya verf," Northern Shipyard, 
Leningradskiy sudostroitelnyy zavod imeni 
A. A. Zhdanova, Northern Shipyard Open 
Joint Stock Company. 

ADDRESS 

198096 St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Korabelnaya, 6 

Tel: (011-7-812) 184-8233, 184-8284 (chief 
engineer); Telex: 121386 SVER SU, 121386 
KLAPAN; Fax: (011-7-812) 184-7678; E- 

Mail: N/A 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Destroyers. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Roll-on/Roll- 
off (RO/RO) freighters; bulk carriers; 
accessories and spare parts for ships; salvage 
and diving equipment; barges; souvenirs; 
mattresses; furniture; consumer goods; metal 
structures; washbasins; nails. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED 

N/A. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Bulk carriers 
HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 



GENERAL OVERVIEW: Severnaya Vert 
is a major shipyard producing both naval and 
civilian ships. It is capable of building 
merchant ships up to 13,000 deadweight 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-53 



Jul] Wv* 



Enterprise name: "SEVERNOYE" 
DESIGN BUREAU (Northern) 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAME: KB Sever 



technology for ships. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: There are 
several conversion programs under 
consideration by the enterprise for the design 
of ships for commercial purposes. 



ADDRESS: 

198096, Russia, St. Petersburg, Ulitsa 
Korabelnaya, 6 

Tel: (812) 184-7674 

Fax: (812) 184-1277, 184-8312 

Telex: N/A; E- mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Large design 
bureau specializing in ship design; co-located 
with the Northern Shipyard. 

PRODUCT SPECIALITY: Design of 
large ships. 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROX. EMPLOYMENT: Total: 830; 
Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Vladimir Yukhin, General Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Design 
of large antisubmarine battleships, cruisers 
and torpedo boat destroyers. 

CVIL PRODUCT LINES: Design of 
civilian ships. 

KEY TECH. / EQUEPT. : Design 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-54 



OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The structure of the enterprise hasn't 
changed during the last years. The enterprise 
has a "project" department that functions as 
a marketing department. Ninety percent of 
production is delivered to state-owned 
factories and 10 percent to privately-owned 
firms. 



Enterprise name: SIGNAL 

SCD2NTIFIC-INDUSTRIAL 

ENTERPRISE 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: NPP Signal, PO 
Signal 

ADDRESS: 

193019, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Knipovich, 4 

Tel: (01 1-7-812) 567-2233; Fax : (011-7- 
812) 567-8355;Telex: 122269 PIRS; 
Teletype: N/A; E- mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Signal 
Scientific Industrial Enterprise produces . 
communication equipment for the military 
and the civilian market. The company has 
four sites, including a central design office 
and three factories. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Radio Equipment. 
SIC Code: 3571, 3651,3661,3663, 3843, 

July 1996 



3944, 3999. 



Signal: 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Communications Equipment 
Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 3,700; Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Professor Valentin P. Zanin, Director 

OWNERSHIP: One of the three factories 
has been transformed into a joint-stock 
company "SPECTR". The others remain 
state-owned, although they are taking steps 
towards privatization. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1944 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Communications equipment, including 
cryptographic equipment and telephones. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES Renovation of 
electrical and electronic and medical 
equipment: systems for ultraviolet and 
combined UV-Magnetic-Laser therapy of 
human blood, dental chairs; comm ercial 
information protection systems; Infra-Red 
vision devices and similar equipment for 
commercial use; Infra-Red driers for fruits, 
mushrooms and other produce. 



1. St. Petersburg International Business 
Center. 

2. Advanced Output Devices for control 
systems, computers, data processing and 
transmission systems. 

3. Advanced Miniprinters and similar 
devices . 

4. Specialized criminalistic laboratories with 
advanced communications and artificial 
vision devices. 

5. Cryptographic confidential information 
protection systems 

6. Ecological equipment for purification and 
regeneration of electroplating. 

7. Radio and Telephone mobile system for 
transportation on route between St. 
Petersburg-Novorossiysk. 

8. Automobile electronics (Electronic 
systems for fuel injection) 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Signal has joint projects with Deutsche 
Telecom (Renovation of telephones), 
International American Products, Inc. 
(Dental chairs) and others. 



Enterprise name: SREDNENEVSKY 
SHIPBUILDING PLANT 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 



KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : 

N/A 

PRIMARY TECH. / EQUIPT. Precision 
mechanics, PCB manufacturing, various 
assembly lines. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: The 

following projects are under consideration by 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-55 



ALTERNATE NAMES: Sredne-Nevskiv 
sudostroitelnyy zavod. Middle Neva 
Shipyard, Ust-Izhora Shipyard 

ADDRESS 

189633, Kolpino Rayon. Russia 
St. Petersburg, 
Prospect Pontonnyy 



Juh W*> 



199106, Russia, St. Petersburg, 
Shkiperskiy protok, 1 9 

Telephone: (011-7-812) 265-5580, 265- 
5535 (Director), 265-5500 (technical Mgr.); 
Telex: N/A; Fax: (011-7-812) 463-9766 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The 

Srednenevsky shipyard, located near the 
junction of the Izhora and Neva rivers in the 
Kolpino district of southern St.Petersburg, is 
an important builder of mine warfare ships 
for the Russian navy. The yard probably 
dates back to 1911, when the St. Petersburg 
Metals Plant, then a builder of marine 
turbines, established a shipyard at Ust-Izhora 
to build destroyers. Between the world wars 
the Ust-Izhora yard was limited to the 
construction of river barges. It was 
expanded into a major builder of 
minesweepers and other small combatants 
after World War II and built ships of the 
steel-hulled T-43, T-58, Turka, and Natya 
classes in the 1950s and 1960s. It has also 
built a few large tugs and small tankers for 
service as naval auxiliaries. 

Around 1 970 it began to experiment with 
glass-reinforced plastic and subsequently 
built a few Zhenya-class minehunters and 
many Yevgenya- and Lida-class inshore 
minesweepers. It also built hydrofoils of the 
Matka and Turya classes and the Tarantul- 
class missile corvettes. Today it is offering 
several types of ships on the civil market 
similar to its minesweeper classes, including 
ships of upto 100 tons with glass-reinforced 
plastic hulls, steel-hulled ships of up to 800 
tons, and similar ships built with low- 
magnetic steel. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: shipbuilding; SIC 
Code: 2023, 2511, 2514, 3523, 3536, 5337, 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1-56 



3589,3731,3732,3799. 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN.: 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Viktor Pavlovich Pylev, Director 
Yuriy S.Yegorov, Technical Manger, 
Vsevolod D. Semenov, Commercial Dir. 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1911 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Minesweepers and small missile-armed 
combatants. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Ships and ship 
equipment, control and measuring 
instruments, automated systems and devices, 
dried milk, agricultural machinery, machinery 
for the food processing industry, household 
furniture, pleasure boats and sailboats. 

KEY TECH./EQUEPT. EMPLOYED 

N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFO: N/A 



Enterprise name: ST. PETERSBURG 
KRASNY OKTYABR MACHINE- 
BUILDING ENTERPRISE 

LAST UPDATE : December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Sankt- 
Peterburgskoye mashinostroitelnoye 
predpriyatiye "Krasnyy Oktyabr," Red 
October Machine Building Production 



July 1996 



Association 



N/A 



ADDRESS: 

194100, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Politekhnicheskaya, 13/15 

Tel.: (011-7-812) 247-9715, Telex: N/A; 
Teletype: 322194 KARTER SU; Fax: (011- 
7-812) 247-2634; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Krasny 
Oktyabr Machine-Building Enterprise is a 
major producer of helicopter engines and 
components, as well as being the only 
producer of helicopter engine transmissions 
in the former USSR. It also has produced 
fighter jet engines and rocket engines. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Aircraft Engines; 
SIC Code: 3724; HS #: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 7,000; Date: 1992. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICER 

Anatoliy N. Fomichev, General Director 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 
YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Helicopter engines, generators, and 
transmissions; fighter jet engines; rocket 
engines. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Helicopter 
engines and other components. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

J.S. Department of Commerce 
IDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



CONVERSION PROJECTS Mopeds, 
engines for small tractors, snowmobiles, 
small motorcycles, gas turbine engines of 
various sizes, transmissions self-propelled 
cultivators, home water heaters, small 
winches, kitchen knives, footwear-making 
equipment, and medical equipment. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The Krasnyy Oktyabr enterprise does serial 
production of engines developed by the 
Klimov Design Bureau in St. Petersburg. 



Enterprise name: SVETLANA JOINT- 
STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: February 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: NPO Svetlana, 
Leningrad Svetlana Electronic Instrument 
Building Association, The St. Petersburg 
Svetlana Conglomerate of the Electronic 
Instrument Engineering Industry, Svetlana 
Electronic Device Manufacturing 
Corporation, Svetlana Electronic Instrument- 
Making Association. 

ADDRESS: 

194156. St. Petersburg, Russia 
Prospekt Engelsa, 27 

Tel: (011-7-812) 554-91-08, 554-03-72. 
554-03-70; Telex: 121466 ELEKS SU; Fax 
(011-7-812)553-70-01; Teletype: 121004 
BARKHAT 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Svetlana 
Joint-Stock Company is a lame 

July 1996 



1-57 



conglomerate primarily involved in the 
research, design, and manufacturing of 
electronic, microwave and electronic 
instruments. Svetlana also produces a wide 
variety of other products including medical, 
transportation, communications, agriculture, 
and recreation equipment and household 
appliances. The Svetlana Joint-Stock 
Company consists of approximately five 
separate plants, five experimental design 
bureaus, and two addresses, 27 Prospekt 
Engelsa and 2 Prospekt Svetlanskiy, for the 
main Svetlana facility in St. Petersburg. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Microelectronics; 
SIC Code: 3231, 3469, 3671, 3679, 3823, 
3825, 3844, 3845, 3861, 3873, 3944 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Electronics Industry 

APPROX. EMPLOYMENT: 10,600 
(down from 28,000 in the 1980's) 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Vladmir Popov, General Director 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1889 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Military 
electronics. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: The Svetlana 
Association produces a variety of electronic 
and microelectronic instruments, including 
transmitting and modulator tubes for all 
frequency ranges; X-band broadband passive 
TR limiter; klystron amplifiers; X-ray and 
radio tubes; portable X-ray units for 
medicine and industry; high-frequency fast 
response thyristors; transistors; integrated 



microcircuits; microwave components, 
microcomputer; microcontrollers; 
microcalculators; ultrasonic delay lines; 
receiving tubes; process equipment for the 
manufacture of electronic engineering items, 
the Svetlana Company also produces 
consumer goods such as articles made from 
electro-vacuum glass, dewar flasks, lamp- 
brackets, photographic and cinema 
accessories, agriculture selection equipment, 
coffee makers, ski bindings, strings for 
musical instruments, glass and crystal 
utensils and articles, thermos flasks, 
automobile mirrors, tachometers, chess 
computers, and toys. 

KEY TECH. /EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: The Svetlana 
received $3 million from the U.S. Defense 
Enterprise Fund and established a subsidiary 
SED-SPB to market electronic devices. 
Svetlana established a joint venture with R & 
G Inc., a U.S. company. This joint venture 
(SED-SPB) empolys 2,500. SED-SPB's 
output equals that of all Svetlans's 
subsidiaries combined. Svetlana is still 
seeking to enter into additional joint ventures 
for manufacturing electronic engineering 
equipment; cooperate in the marketing and 
sales of products, with the sales rights 
allotted to its partners; exchange electronic 
engineering equipment for process 
equipment; purchase special equipment for 
the manufacturing of electronics; and 
advertise its products on the international 
market. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Because of its sucessful cooperation with its 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



July 1996 



1-58 



U.S. partner, Svetlana's export sales are 
booming. It predicts a 12 percent growth in 
production in 1996. Svetlana will also 
modify any of its products to meet the 
specific needs of its customers; develop new 
items for its customers within a period of six 
to twelve months; and extend licenses for 
manufacturing electronic engineering 
equipment. Setlana became a joint stock 
company in 1994. 



and a Branch for Hydroponics & Thermal 
Optics, 190000 St. Petersburg. 
Pochtamtskaya 3. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Optics R&D; SIC 

Code: 3828; HS#: N/A 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 12,000. Date: 1991. 



Enterprise name: VAVELOV STATE 
OPTICAL INSTITUTE 



PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Guriy T. Petrovsky, Director General 



LAST UPDATE: December 1995 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1918 



ALTERNATE NAMES: Gosudarstvennyy 
opticheskiy institut (GOI) imeni S. I. 
Vavilova; All-Russian Science Center "State 
Optical Institute imeni S.I. Vavilova" 

ADDRESS: 

199034 St. Petersburg, Russia 
Birzhevaya Liniya, 1 2 

Tel: (011-7-812) 218-4892, 218-7526; 
Telex: 121235 GOI.SU; Teletype: 122118 
LAVINA;Fax: (011-7-812) 128-3720; 
E-Mail: niop@niopsh.spb.su 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Vavilov 
Institute, like the U.S. National Institute of 
Standards and Technology, sets the 
standards for all optics institutes, plants, and 
enterprises in the former Soviet Union. 
Roughly 60 percent of Vavilov's research 
and design efforts were dedicated to military 
and space projects. It includes the Scientific 
Research Institute of Testing Complexes for 
Optical Electronic Instruments & Systems, 
188537 Sosnovyy Bpr, Leningrad Oblast, 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Optical 
components for weapons, including 
submarine and naval applications, space and 
strategic defense; guidance systems; 
spectroscopic instruments; radiometers. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Television 
equipment; multipath interferometers; 
beacons; marine navigation signals; 
lighthouses; flash lamps; zoom and other 
variable-focus cameras; automobile 
headlights; airport landing lights; 
opthalomological lenses; zinc selenide for 
lasers; special-effect holograms; iridium 
mirrors. Space and lasers optics, including 
large lenses and mirrors; beryllium and 
composite mirrors; adaptive optics. 
diamond-turned metal mirrors, glass- 
crystalline mirrors; wide range of anti- 
reflective and mirror coatings; photoelectric 
sensors. General optical instruments, 
including image transmission fiber bundle for 
medical endoscopes; reflective, selective, and 
anti-reflective coatings, computer-aided lens 
design; computer-aided production and 



J.S. Department of Commerce 
LDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Ju!\ W*> 



1-59 



testing of precision optical surfaces; methods 
for polishing extremely soft or hard optical 
materials; ultrasonic and ion cleaning and ion 
polishing; aspheric surface generation; 
infrared imagers for medical diagnosis and 
for industrial uses such as detection of heat 
losses in buildings and in heat supply 
systems. 

KEY TECH. /EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

See tech. and processes described above. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Production 
of lasers for medical uses in place of lasers 
used for defense applications. Civil products 
exhibited in 1993 include the world's largest 
color hologram and laser equipment for 
engraving crystal tableware. 



321201 SVINETS; Telex: N/A; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: Vektor is a 
research institute specializing in radio 
components and radiotechnical 
reconnaissance systems. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electronics 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Communications Equipment 
Industry 

APPROX. EMPLOYMENT: Total: 2,360; 
Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Gennady M. Kobyakob, Director 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 



OWNERSHIP: State-owned 



OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Vavilov publishes the journals Optical 
Journal and Works of the Vavilov Institute 
and sells some of its products through V/O 
MASHPRIBORINTORG, 121200 Moscow, 
Telexes: 411235,411236. 



Enterprise name: VEKTOR 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Nauchno- 
issledovatelniy onstitut "Vektor", Nil Vektor 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Radio- 
Technical reconnaissance equipment 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Hearing aids, 
electronic equipment, for cars and 
locomotives. 

KEY TECH. /EQUD?T. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 
HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 



ADDRESS: 

197376, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ulitsa Academica Pavlova 14A 



OTHER RELEVANT INFO. : N/A 



Tel: (011-7-812) 233-7815, 234-1509, 
Fax: (011-7-812)234-1974; Teletype: 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



July 1996 



1-60 



Enterprise name: VYBORG 
INSTRUMENT BUILDING PLANT 

LAST UPDATE: March 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Vyborgskiy 
priborostroitelniy zavod, Vyborg Electronic 
Equipment Making Plant 

ADDRESS: 

188900, Vyborg, Leningrad Oblast, Russia 
Ulitsa Danilova, 1 5 

Tel: (01 1-7-812) 78 254-06, 78 289-16, 
Experimental Design. Bureau (011-7-812) 
732-254-06; Fax: (01 1-7-812) 78 217-45 
Telex: N/A; Teletype: 322856 KLEN; E- 
mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The plant 
specializes in products for the electronics 
industry, including devices for pollution 
control, computing equipment, medical 
devices, and communications equipment. 
The plant has a co-located Experimental 
Design Bureau. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electronics 
including electron microscopes and electron 
beam equipment. 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Electronics Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 1,200; Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Gennady N. Fedoronko, Director 

Boris V. Gin, Deputy Dir./ External Affairs 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1953 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: 

Electronic and control equipment. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Small electron 
microscopes, pollution control devices. 
medical respirators, aerosol particle 
counters, scales, dosimeters, mass 
spectrometers, computers, and precision 
temperature regulators. 

KEY TECH. / EQUIPT. : The plant 

possesses a sufficient quantity of high 
precision machining equipment, control- 
measuring equipment and devices for 
radiophysical characteristics measurement. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Production 
of scales, automobile wiring, harnesses and 
electron microscopes. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The plant is interested in foreign partners for 
organization of new product manufacturing 
using technical abilities of the plant in 
accordance with Western technologies. 



Enterprise name: D.V. YEFREMOY 
STATE SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH 
INSTITUTE OF ELECTROPHYSICAL 
APPRATUS 

LAST UPDATE: February' 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: NIIEFA Imeni 
Yefremova 

ADDRESS: 

189631, St. Petersburg, pos.Metallostun. 

Russia 

Sovetskiy Prospekt, 1 

Jul\ 



1-61 



Telephone: (011-7-812) 464-7980, 464- 
5845; Telex: N/A; Teletype: 3221 15 
OBZOR; Fax: (011-7-812) 265-7974; E- 
Mail: filatov@niiefa.spb.su 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Tefremova 
Institute is a leading designer of lasers, 
particle accelerators and other specialized 
electrical equipment for research and 
industry. It developed the TOKOMAK 
controlled thermonuclear fusion installation, 
and has participated in the building of all 
large accelerator, laser and thermonuclear 
fusion installations in the former Soviet 
Union. It was formerly a part of NPO 
Elektrofizka. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Nuclear physics; 
SIC Code: 3443, 3511,3621,3699, 3845 



accessories. 

KEY TECH./EQUEPT. EMPLOYED: 

N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Low-energy 
medical linear accelerators for cancer 
treatment and medical sterilization. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT 

Housing, day care, kindergardens, medical 
clinic, sports complex. 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The Yefremov institute has been a 
participant in the International 
Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor 
Project. 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN.: 

Ministry of Atomic Power 



Enterprise name: ZVEZDA JOINT 
STOCK COMPANY 



APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 2500. Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Oleg A. Gusev, Deputy Director for 
Electrotechnical Equipment 
Mikhail D. Veselov, Deputy Director for 
Economics 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 



LAST UPDATE: March 1995 

ADDRESS: 193012, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Ultisa Babushkina, 123 

Tel: (011-7-812) 262-0747, 262-0747; 
marketing dept. 262-8142; fax: (01 1-7-812) 
267-4685, 262-5518, marketing dept. 267- 
2364; Tele-type: 322183 KOLCO; E-mail: 

N/A 



YEAR ESTABLISHED 1945 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: N/A. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Nuclear 
reactors and particle accelerators, lasers 
electric motors and other electric machines, 
generators for steam and gas turbines, and 
electric equipment spare parts and 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



GENERAL OVERVIEW: Joint Stock 
Company "ZVEZDA" is a high volume . 
manufacturer of light-weight high-speed 
diesel engines and diesel electric generating 
sets used in submarines, torpedo, rocket and 
landing boats. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Branch: high- 
speed light-weight diesel engines SIC Code: 

July 1996 



1-62 



3519 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of Transportations 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: 

Total: 5,000; Date: 1994. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICER: 

Valery A. Radchenko, General Director, 
Vladimir F. Kopasevich, Director of Foreign- 
Economic Relations, 
Alexander V. Tyubin, Commercial Director 

OWNERSHIP: Joint stock company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED 1932 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Engines 
for tanks, submarines, torpedo, rocket- 
artillery boats and landing craft. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: High-speed, 
diesel engines from 500 to 1 100 kw for 
locomotive, truck, trawler, earthmover, 
hydrofoil boat use. Also diesel-electric 
generating sets from to 7350 kw and heavy 
duty pumping units. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED: 

Aluminium alloy castings to 400 kg., steel 
and titanium forgings to 50 kg. Eighteen 
shops with the latest machining centers. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Engines for 
hydro-foil passenger ferries and large UPS 
(un-interruptible power supplies). 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: The 

plant has a fully developed social services 
infra-structure with kindergardens, clinics 
and swiming pools. 



OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The plant exports its products to a large 
number of overseas customers in many 
countries. 



J.S. Department of Commerce 
IDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



1-63 



Juh N*> 



CHAPTER 2 - MINI-PROFILES OF START-UP 
ENTERPRISES IN ST.PETERSBURG/ LENINGRAD 

OBLAST 

INDEX; 

NAME OF ENTERPRISE PAGE 
Shipbuilding 

Interferum-Metal Joint Venture 8 

Shipbuilding Academy 9 

Almaz Shipbuilding Firm 9 

Armalit Open Joint Stock Company 9 

Vodtranspribor Open Joint Stock Company 9 

State Enterprise Vodtranspriborpusk 9 

Central Design Bureau Vostok 9 

State Enterprise Plant Dvigatel 1 

Special Design Bureau Dozhd 1 

Special Design Bureau Indikator Joint Stock Company 1 

Special Design and Technology Bureau Kompensator 1 

Kompressor Open Joint Stock Company 1 

Special Design Bureau Kotlostroenie 1 

Central Design Bureau Meridian 1 

Morelektroradiokomlekt Joint Stock Company 1 

Proletarskiy Zavod (Proletarian Plant) Joint Stock Company 1 

RUMB Joint Stock Company 1 1 

State Enterprise Center Sudpromokhrana 1 1 

Special Technical Servicing Center Toil" 1 1 



U.S. Department of Commerce July l^Oo 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2- 1 



Shturmanskie Pribory Open Joint Stock Company 

State Enterprise Era 

Central Scientific Research Institute Lot 

Plant Northern Press 

State Planning Institute (Soyuzproektverf ) 

State Enterprise Zapadnoe (Western) Planning and Design Bureau 

Design Bureau Svyaz'morproekt 

Leningrad Plant imeni Kulakov 

Naval Bureau for Machine Building Malakhit 

Science and Production Association Avrora 

Experimental Plant Avrora of Science & Production Association Avrora 

Central Scientific Research Institute Avrora 

Joint Stock Company Plant Logoda 

(See Kirovsk Scientific Research Department of the Central Scientific 
Research Institute Morfizpribor) 

Kirovsk Scientific Research Department of the 
Central Scientific Research Institute Morfizpribor 
(See Joint Stock Company Plant Logoda) 

Joint Stock Company Svirsk Shipyard 

Joint Stock Company Leningrad Shipbuilding Plant Pella 

Joint Stock Company Plant Burevestnik 

Open Joint Stock Company Plant Pirs 

Joint Stock Company Special Design 
and Technology Bureau Gals 

Scientific Research Institute Morteplotekhnika 

Experimental Plant Krizo 

Aviation 

St Petersburg Machine Building Plant Vpered 

Petersburg GiproAviaProm Open Joint Stock Company 



11 
11 
11 
11 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 

13 

13 
13 
13 
13 
13 

13 
14 
14 

14 
14 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



2-2 



July 1996 



St Petersburg Plant Pribor Joint Stock Company 1 4 

Special Design Bureau for Planning Complexes 

and Shoemaking Machines 1 4 

Plant Sfera 14 

Tekhpribor Open Joint Stock Company 1 4 

Design Bureau for State Enterprise Tekhpribor 1 5 

Open Coloration St Petersburg Plant TEMP 1 5 

Luga Branch of Joint Stock Company St Petersburg Plant Temp 1 5 

Space 

Scientific Research Institute of Command Instruments 1 5 

Experimental Plant of the Scientific Research 

Institute of Command Instruments 1 5 

Open Joint Stock Company 'Machine Building Association imeni K. Marx' 

for the production of equipment for the production of chemical fibers 1 5 

A Branch of the Central Design Bureau for Heavy Machine Building 1 5 

Aysberg Open Joint Stock Company 1 6 

Interbranch Specialized Medical-Engineering Center Pul'sar 1 6 

Experimental Design Bureau Reaktor 1 6 

Scientific Research Institute of Precision 

Mechanics Open Joint Stock Company 1 6 

Electronics 

Closed Joint Stock Company Design and Technology 1 6 
Bureau Svetlana-Mikroelektronika of the Svetlana Joint Stock Co. 

Closed Joint Stock Company SED-SPB of the 

Svetlana Joint Stock Company 1 6 

Closed Joint Stock Company Svetlana-Poluprovodniki 

(Semi-Conductors) 1 7 

Closed Joint Stock Company Svetlana-EVP 1 7 

Closed Joint Stock Company Svetlana-Rentgen 1 7 

Special Design Bureau Vit 1 7 



U.S. Department of Commerce Jul\ W^-> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-3 



Plant Vitel 17 

Plant Viton Open Joint Stock Company 17 

Gayot Closed Joint Stock Company 17 

Capacitor Plant Kulon Joint Stock Company 18 

Capacitor Plant Mezon 1 8 

Special Design Bureau Joint Stock Company Morion 1 8 

Morion Open Joint Stock Company 18 

Plant Rekond 18 

St Petersburg SSMU 18 

Open Joint Stock Company Scientific Research, 

Planning and Design Enterprise Terminal 18 

Limited Liability Partnership Farada 18 

Special Design and Technology Bureau Ferrod 19 

Ferropribor Joint Stock Company 19 

State Auto Transport Enterprise Elektronavto 1 9 

St Petersburg Administration Elektronkompleks 19 

A Plant at the Central Scientific Research 

Institute Elektron 1 9 

Scientific Research Institute Girikond of 

Science and Production Association Pozitron 19 

Russian Scientific Research Institute 

Elektronstandart 1 9 

State Enterprise Central Scientific 

Research Institute Elektron 1 9 

Open Joint Stock Company Lakond 19 

State Plant Elektronstandart 20 

Radio 

State Plant for Radio Technical Equipment 20 

State Enterprise Navigator 20 

U. S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-4 



Production Association Rossiya 20 

Design Bureau St Petersburg Plant Rossiya 20 

Russian Institute for Radio Navigation and Time 20 

Plant Energiya 20 

Electromechanical Plant Zarya Open Joint Stock Company 21 

Experimental Plant Impul's 21 

Intos Closed Joint Stock Company 21 

Plant Komponent 21 

Leningrad State Planning and Technology Institute 2 1 

Leningrad Design Bureau for Technological Fittings (Osnashcheniya) 2 1 

State Enterprise Mikrotekhnika 2 1 

Scientific Research Institute for Programmed Systems (Sredstv) 22 

Scientific Research Institute for Regional 

Information Management Systems Petrokometa 2 1 

St Petersburg Science and Production Enterprise Piramida 2 1 

Simvol Open Joint Stock Company 22 

Science & Production Enterprise "Radar-MMS" Joint Stock Company 22 

Scientific Research Institute for Radio Apparatuses 22 

Trade Sector Machine Building Plant Joint Stock Company 22 

Joint Stock Company Experimental Plant 22 

Radio Plant Svir 22 

Communications Equipment 

Scientific Research Institute Rubin 22 

Scientific Research Institute Masshtab 23 

Experimental Design Bureau Raduga Joint Stock Company 23 

Science and Production Association Dal'nyaya Svyaz 

(Long Distance Communication) 23 



U.S. Department of Commerce Juh l v)v2 o 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-5 



Scientific Research Institute Del'ta 23 

Scientific Research Institute Neptun 23 

Plant Volna Joint Stock Company 23 

State Planning Institute 23 

Scientific Research Institute Zvezda 23 

Experimental Production Enterprise Zvukotekhnika 24 

State Plant Izmeritel 24 

Special Design Bureau Orion 24 

Priboy Closed Joint Stock Company 24 

Leningrad Leasing Administration Radar 24 

State Enterprise Production and Science Complex 

Severnaya Zarya (Northern Dawn) 24 

Commercial Center Tovakom Joint Stock Company 24 

Television Equipment Plant Ekran 24 

Munitions and Special Chemicals 

Leningrad Plant Sokol 25 

State Plant imeni Morozova 25 

Optics 

Scientific Research Institute for Optical Instrument 

Making for Amateur Photo Equipment 25 

Scientific Research Institute for Complex Research 

on Optical-Electronic Instruments and Systems 25 

Land Arms 

Leningrad Automated Lines Design Bureau Rotor 25 

Open Joint Stock Company Special Machine Building 25 

State Enterprise Machine Building Plant Vulkan 26 

State Science and Production Firm VNITI (All-Russian 

Scientific Research and Technology Institute) 26 

Leningrad Special Design Bureau for Planning 

Textile Machinery 26 

U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-6 



Leningrad Mechanical Plant imeni Karl Libknekht 26 

Lenprodmash Joint Stock Company 26 

Scientific Research and Technology Institute 

of Materials Research 26 

Transmashproekt Open Joint Stock Company 26 

Polyarnaya Zvezda (Pole Star) Research & Production Association 26 

Zvyozdochka (Little Star) Engineering Enterprise 27 



U.S. Department of Commerce Juh 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-7 



St Petersburg Defense Enterprises 

Shipbuilding 

Enterprise name: INTERFERUM-METAL JOINT VENTURE 

LAST UPDATE: December 1995 

ADDRESS: 

191126, St. Petersburg, Russia 
P.O. Box 57 

Tel: (011-7-812) 184-8006, 184-3113, 
Fax: (011-7-812) 185-0984, E-mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: JV Interferrum is one of only a few specialized enterprises in Russia, 
and the only one in the Northwestern part of the country that currently engage in salvaging 
written-off military vessels, submarines, armored tank equipment, missile launchers. It also 
engages in the removal of sunken vessels from ocean floors. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Recovery of scrap metal from large objects. SIC: 7389 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN.: USSR Ministry of Metallurgy 

EMPLOYMENT: About 100 people 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Aleksandr A. Startsev, Gen. Director 
Yelena N. Netyosova, 
Deputy Director for Finances 

OWNERSHIP: Privately owned, joint venture in the form of a closed joint stock company. 
Foreign partner: Finland 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1990 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Salvaging of military equipment. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Processing of industrial scrap metal as raw material for 
metallurgical melting plants. 

KEY TECH./EQUIPT. EMPLOYED : Flame, gas, plasma torch cutting, mechanical cutting of 
scrap metal. Hydraulic scissor jack made by the German co. Lindemann with a force capacity of 
2000 tons; a 100 ton floating crane; two gantry cranes (32 tons and 16 tons); slipway; two 
morages; railway routes; two locomotives; etc. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Demilitarization of submarines, armored equipment, artillery, and 
missile launchers. Participation in Free Economic Zone Development. 

U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-8 



OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: Unique in its geographic location, the enterprise has 
access to the Baltic Sea through its own moorings, railway approaches, and good motor vehicle 
communication; near to (within two kilometers) the major sea and trading port of St. Petersburg. 
The JV's territory, with an area of six hectares, creates favorable prerequisites for setting up a free 
trade zone. 

The Interferrum enterprise has contacts with representatives of the Russian Ministry of Defense 
and military plants for the salvaging of arms and military equipment. It is currently setting up 
plants for the liquidation of arms (military plants make their territories available for this) JV 
Interferrum performs an important ecological function, in Russia's Northwest in the Baltic Sea 
basin, involving the removal of sunken objects from water regions. 

Name: Shipbuilding Academy 

Address: 190008 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Soyuza Pechatnikov, 16 

Phone: 8-812-114-19-64 

Fax: 114-30-23 



Name: Shipbuilding Firm "Almaz" 

Address: 197042 St Petersburg, Petrovskiy Proezd, 26 

Phone: 8-812-234-51-48,235-51-48 

Fax: 235-70-69 

General Director: Anatoliy Petrovich Korolev 



Name: "Armalit" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 198097 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Trefoleva, 2 
Phone: 8-812-292-96-28 
Fax: 252-34-00 



Name: "Vodtranspribor" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 197342 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Serdobol'skaya, 64 

(See State Enterprise "Vodtranspriborpusk") 
Phone: 8-812-242-00-97 
Fax: 242-11-44 



Name: State Enterprise "Vodtranspriborpusk" 

Address: 197342 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Serdobol'skaya, 64 

(See "Vodtranspribor" Open Joint Stock Company) 
Phone: 8-812-244-18-53 
Fax: 242-25-07, 



Name: Central Design Bureau "Vostok" 

Address: 198099 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Promyshlennaya, 17 

Phone: 8-812-186-25-33 

Fax: 186-62-52 



U.S. Department of Commerce Jnlv 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-9 



Name: State Enterprise Plant "Dvigatel"' 

Address: 195175 St Petersburg, Vyborgskaya Naberezhnaya, 13 

Phone: 8-812-542-01-21 

Fax: 542-69-12 



Name: Special Design Bureau "Dozhd"' 

Address: 194044 St Petersburg, Muchnoy Prospekt, 2 

Phone: 8-812-310-57-17 

Fax: NA 



Name: Special Design Bureau "Indikator" Joint Stock Company 
Address: 191011 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Sadovaya, 104 
Phone: 8-812-113-67-40 
Fax: NA 



Name: Special Design and Technology Bureau "Kompensator" 
Address: 198096 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Korabel'naya, 6 
Phone: 8-812-184-23-11 
Fax: NA 



Name: "Kompressor" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 194044 St Petersburg, Prospekt K. Marksa, 64 
Phone: 8-812-245-50-90 
Fax: 245-69-12 



Name: Special Design Bureau "Kotlostroenie' 
Address: 199026 St Petersburg, 23rd Line, 2 
Phone: 8-812-217-23-77 
Fax: 217-23-77 



Name: Central Design Bureau "Meridian" 
Address: 197198 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Blokhina, 19 
Phone: 8-812-232-39-75 
Fax: 233-94-07 



Name: "Morelektroradiokomlekt" Joint Stock Company 
Address: 190000 St Petersburg, Prospekt Grivtsova, 3 
Phone: 8-812-314-04-68 
Fax: 315-75-30 



Name: "Proletarskiy Zavod" (Proletarian Plant) 

Joint Stock Company 
Address: 193029 St Petersburg, Prospekt Dudko, 3 

U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2- 1 



Phone: 8-812-567-32-30 
Fax: 567-44-66 



Name: "Rumb" Joint Stock Company 

Address: 198188, Russia, St. Petersburg, Ultitsa Zaitseva, 41 

Phone: (01 1-7-8 12)1 84-73 12(Director), 184-7311 (Chief Engineer) 

Fax: (011-7-812) 185-0869 

Teletype: 321814 Poisk 

Overview: The company is primarily involved in economic research, consulting and economic 

analysis of former shipbuilding ministry's enterprises. (Date: February 1996) 
Employment: The company has 36 employees (December 1995) and was established in 1992. 

Alexander A. Lotsenko 
Ownership: The company is privatized with the state owning 22 percent. Employees 23 

percent and investors owning 55 percent. The company receives no government 

subsidies. 



Name: State Enterprise "Center 'Sudpromokhrana'" 
Address: 199026 St Petersburg, 27th Line, 4 
Phone: 8-812-251-52-72 
Fax: 251-04-66 



Name: Special Technical Servicing Center "Toir" 
Address: 198020 St Petersburg, Rizhskiy Prospekt, 23 
Phone: 8-812-251-52-72 
Fax: 251-04-66 



Name: "Shturmanskie Pribory" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 1951 12 St Petersburg, Krasnogvardeyskaya Ploshchad, 1 
Phone: 8-812-224-05-37 
Fax: 224-04-90 



Name: State Enterprise "Era" 

Address: 190000 St Petersburg, Prospekt Grivtsova, 1 

Phone: 8-812-311-39-19 

Fax: 315-41-20 



Name: Central Scientific Research Institute "Lot" 

Address: 199178 St Petersburg, Vasil'evskiy Ostrov (Island), 19th Line, 24 

Phone: 8-812-213-42-44 

Fax: 213-42-44 



Name: Plant "Northern Press" 

Address: 195196 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Tallinskaya, 7 

U.S. Department of Commerce .hilv W v >o 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-11 



Phone: 8-812-221-24-41 
Fax: NA 



Name: State Planning Institute (Soyuzproektverf ) 
Address: St Petersburg, NFI 
Phone: 8-812-23-09 
Fax: NA 



Name: State Enterprise "Zapadnoe (Western) Planning and Design Bureau" 
Address: 196128 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Varshavskaya, 50 
Phone: 8-812-296-11-44,296-55-02 
Fax: NA 



Name: Design Bureau "Svyaz'morproekt" 
Address: 190000 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Gogolya, 14 
Phone: 8-812-312-82-68 
Fax: 315-31-49 



Name: Leningrad Plant imeni Kulakov 

Address: 197198 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Yablochkova, 20 

Phone: 8-812-233-89-26 

Fax: NA 



Name: Naval Bureau for Machine Building "Malakhit" 
Address: 1 96 1 3 5 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Frunze, 1 8 
Phone: 8-812-298-35-90 
Fax: 298-19-17 



Name: Science and Production Association "Avrora" 

Address: 194021 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Karbysheva, 15 

Officers: Victor M.Korchanov, Doctor of Technical Sciences & Academician, Deputy 

General Director (Phone: 8-812-275-07-22, Fax: 271-79-04) 
Phone: 8-812-247-22-50 
Fax: 247-80-61 



Name: Experimental Plant "Avrora" of Science and Production Association "Avrora" 
Address: St Petersburg, NFI 
Phone: 8-812-555-57-71 
Fax: NA 



Name: Central Scientific Research Institute "Avrora" 
Address: St Petersburg, NFI 
Phone: 8-812-247-22-50 

U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2- 1 2 



fax: NA 



Name: State Enterprise "Ravenstvo-Servis" 

Address: 198099 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Promyshlennaya, 19 

Phone: 8-812-186-29-06 

Fax: 186-45-05 



Name: Joint Stock Company "Plant 'Logoda'" (See Kirovsk Scientific Research Department of 

the Central Scientific Research Institute "Morfizpribor") 
Address: 188690 Kirovsk, Leningrad Oblast, Ulitsa Naberezhnaya, 1 
Phone: 8-81262-2-09-79 
Fax: 2-13-67 



Name: Kirovsk Scientific Research Department of the Central Scientific Research Institute 

"Morfizpribor" (See Joint Stock Company "Plant 'Logoda'") 
Address: 188690 Kirovsk, Leningrad Oblast, Ulitsa Naberezhnaya, 1 
Phone: 8-81262-2-44-05 
Fax: 2-13-67 



Name: Joint Stock Company "Svirsk Shipyard" 

Address: Nikol'skiy Poselenie (Settlement), Leningrad Oblast, Podporozhskiy Rayon, 

Ulitsa Novaya, 1 6 
Phone: 8-8265-2-03-98 
Fax: 2-02-52 



Name: Joint Stock Company "Leningrad Shipbuilding Plant 'Pella'" 
Address: 188694 Otradnoe, Leningrad Oblast, Ulitsa Tsentral'naya, 4 
Phone: 8-16-4-42-91 
Fax: 315-36-42 



Name: Joint Stock Company "Plant 'Burevestnik'" 

Address: 188350 Gatchina, Leningrad Oblast, Ulitsa Sovetskaya, 31 

Phone: 8-81271-2-33-02 

Fax: 3-62-60 



Name: Open Joint Stock Company "Plant 'Pirs'" 

Address: 188900 Vyborg-46, Leningrad Oblast, Polelenie (Settlement) imeni Kalinina. 

Ulitsa Ruberoidnaya, 27 
Phone: 8-81278-2-06-74 
Fax: 2-06074 



Name: Joint Stock Company "Special Design and Technology Bureau 'Gals'" 
Address: 188900 Vyborg,Leningrad Oblast,Ulitsa Fizkultornaya,17-a 

U.S. Department of Commerce Jul\ 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2- 1 3 



Phone: 8-81278-2-74-86 
Fax: 2-61-09 



Name: Scientific Research Institute "Morteplotekhnika" 
Address: 189510 Lomonosov, Leningrad Oblast, Verkhniy Park, 1 
Phone: 8-812-422-45-64 
Fax: 422-75-35 



Name: Experimental Plant "Krizo" 

Address: 188350 Gatchina, Leningrad Oblast, 1st Industrial Zone, 

Ulitsa Zheleznodorozhnaya, 43 
Phone: 8-81271-2-38-87 



Aviation 

Name: St Petersburg Machine Building Plant "Vpered" 

Address: 199048 St Petersburg, Naberezhnaya Reki Smolenki, 19/21 

Phone: 8-812-355-88-74 

Fax: 218-28-85,355-88-60 



Name: "Petersburg GiproAviaProm" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 194044 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Smolyachkova, 19 
Phone: 8-812-542-90-23 
Fax: NA 



Name: St Petersburg Plant 'Pribor'" Joint Stock Company 

Address: 199034 St Petersburg, Vasil'evskiy Ostrov (Island), 17th Line 2a 

Phone: 8-812-213-47-05 

Fax: NA 



Name: Special Design Bureau for Planning Complexes and Shoemaking Machines 
Address: 000000 St Petersburg, Izmaylovskiy Prospekt, 22, 
Phone: 8-812-292-59-70 
Fax: NA 



Name: Plant "Sfera" 

Address: 199050 St Petersburg, NFI 

Phone: 8-812-213-73-04 

Fax: NA 



Name: "Tekhpribor" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 196084 St Petersburg, Korpusnoy Proezd, 1-a 
Phone: 8-812-296-97-27 

U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-14 



Fax: 296-95-72 



Name: Design Bureau for State Enterprise "Tekhpribor" 
Address: 196084 St Petersburg, Korpusnoy Proezd, 1-a, M-6 
Phone: 8-812-296-97-27 
Fax: NA 



Name: Open Coloration "St Petersburg Plant 'TEMP'" 
Address: 198095 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Shvetsova, 23 
Phone: 8-812-252-07-08 
Fax: 252-69-81 



Name: Luga Branch of Joint Stock Company "St Petersburg Plant 'Temp'" 
Address: 188260 Luga, Leningrad Oblast, Ulitsa Bol'shaya Zarechnaya, 19 
Phone: 8-81272-2-18-10 
Fax: NA 



Space 

Name: Scientific Research Institute "Impul's" 
Address: 195220 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Obruchevykh, 1 

(See Interbranch Specialized Medical-Engineering Center "Pul'sar") 
Phone: 8-812-245-58-48 
Fax: 530-99-83 



Name: Scientific Research Institute of Command Instruments 
Address: 198216 St Petersburg, Tramvaynyy Prospekt, 16 
Phone: 8-812-255-85-85 
Fax: 254-94-97 



Name: Experimental Plant of the Scientific Research Institute of Command Instalments 
Address: 198216 St Petersburg, NFI 
Phone: 8-812-255-01-65 
Fax: NA 



Name: Open Joint Stock Company "Machine Building Association imeni K. Marx" for the 

production of equipment for the production of chemical fibers 
Address: 194044 St Petersburg, Bol'shoy Sampsonievskiy Prospekt, 66 
Phone: 8-812-245-07-80 
Fax: 245-61-83 
Products: Missile- and space-related equipment; knitting machinery. 

Name: A Branch of the Central Design Bureau for Heavy Machine Building 

U.S. Department of Commerce .Uil\ l°°o 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-15 



Address: 198005 St Petersburg, Obvodnoy Kanal, 118 
Phone: 8-812-292-32-84 
Fax: NA 



Name: "Aysberg" Open Joint Stock Company 

Address: 199034 St Petersburg, Vasil'evskiy Ostrov (Island), Bol'shoy Prospekt, 36 

Phone: 8-812-213-36-09 

Fax: 213-55-78 



Name: Interbranch Specialized Medical-Engineering Center "Pul'sar" 
Address: 195220 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Obruchevykh, 1 
(See Scientific Research Institute "Impul's") 
Phone: 8-812-247-64-01 
Fax: NA 



Name: Experimental Design Bureau "Reaktor" 

Address: 193012 St Petersburg, Prospekt Obukhovskoy Oborony, 12a 

Phone: 8-812-267-97-21 

Fax: NA 



Name: "Scientific Research Institute of Precision Mechanics" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 195256 St Petersburg, Prospekt Nepokorennykh, 47 
Phone: 8-812-535-17-00 
Fax: 535-83-74 



Electronics 

Name: "Svetlana" Joint Stock Company 

Address: 194156 St Petersburg, Prospekt Engel'sa, 21 

Phone: 8-812-554-03-70 

Fax: 553-70-01 



Name: Closed Joint Stock Company "Design and Technology Bureau 'Svetlana- 

Mikroelektronika" of the "Svetlana" Joint Stock Company 
Address: 196066 St Petersburg, Moskovskoe Shosse, 46 
Phone: 8-812-293-67-03 
Fax: 108-44-47 



Name: Closed Joint Stock Company "Svetlana-Elektronpribor" of the "Svetlana" Joint Stock 

Company 
Address: 194156 St Petersburg, Prospekt Engel'sa, 27 
Phone: 8-812-554-94-51 
Fax: 553-70-01 



U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-16 



Name: Closed Joint Stock Company "Svetlana-Mashinostroeniye' 
Address: 194156 St Petersburg, Prospekt Engel'sa, 27 
Phone: 8-812-554-91-91 
Fax: 553-70-01 



Name: Closed Joint Stock Company "SED-SPB" of the "Svetlana" Joint Stock Company 
Address: 194156 St Petersburg, Prospekt Engel'sa, 27 
Phone: 8-812-554-93-68 
Fax: 554-03-71 



Name: Closed Joint Stock Company "Svetlana-Poluprovodniki (Semi-Conductors)' 
Address: 194156 St Petersburg, Prospekt Engel'sa, 27 
Phone: 8-812-554-03-85 
Fax: 554-70-01 



Name: Closed Joint Stock Company "Svetlana-EVP" 
Address: 194156 St Petersburg, Prospekt Engel'sa, 27 
Phone: 8-812-553-25-65 
Fax: NA 



Name: Closed Joint Stock Company "Svetlana-Rentgen" 
Address: 198170 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Promyshlennaya, 5 
Phone: 8-812-186-59-44 
Fax: NA 



Name: Special Design Bureau "Vit" 

Address: 194295 St Petersburg, Poeticheskiy Bul'var, 2 

Phone: 8-812-597-92-02 

Fax: 597-00-17 



Name: Plant "Vitel" 

Address: 194295 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Ivana Fomina, 6 

Phone: 8-812-597-23-11 

Fax: NA 



Name: "Plant 'Viton'" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 194295 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Ivana Fomina, 6 
Phone: 8-812-597-23-11 
Fax: 597-07-37 



Name: "Gayot" Closed Joint Stock Company 

Address: 197022 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Professora Popova, 23 

Phone: 8-812-234-44-36 

U.S. Department of Commerce .'ulv l v ^> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-17 



Fax: NA 



Name: "Capacitor Plant 'Kulon'" Joint Stock Company 
Address: 195176 St Petersburg, Piskarevskiy Prospekt, 25 
Phone: 8-812-225-02-46 
Fax: 225-26-65 



Name: Capacitor Plant "Mezon" 

Address: 194175 St Petersburg, Bol'shoy Sampsonievskiy Prospekt,28 

Phone: 8-812-542-15-61 

Fax: 542-50-41 



Name: Special Design Bureau Joint Stock Company "Morion" 
Address: 199155 St Petersburg, Prospekt Kima, 13 -a 
Phone: 8-812-350-78-72 
Fax: 350-72-90 



Name: "Morion" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 199155 St Petersburg, Prospekt Kima, 13-a 
Phone: 8-812-350-75-75 
Fax: 350-95-65 



Name: Plant "Rekond" 

Address: 194021 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Kurchatova, 10 
(See "Pozitron" Open Joint Stock Company) 
Phone: 8-812-43-33 
Fax: 552-60-57 



Name: St Petersburg SSMU 

Address: 194214 St Petersburg, Prospekt Engel'sa, 99 

Phone: 8-812-553-68-38 

Fax: NA 



Name: Open Joint Stock Company "Scientific Research, 

Planning and Design Enterprise 'Terminal'" 
Address: 193 124 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Krasnykh Tekstil'shchikov, 2 
Phone: 8-812-274-72-03 
Fax: 271-58-09 



Name: Limited Liability Partnership "Farada" 
Address: 194021 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Kurchatova, 10 
Phone: 8-812-921-68-07; Fax: N/A 



U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-18 



Name: Special Design and Technology Bureau "Ferrod" 
Address: 198320 St Petersburg, Krasnoe Selo, Ulitsa Svobody, 50 
Phone: 8-812-132-12-20 
Fax: NA 



Name: "Ferropribor" Joint Stock Company 

Address: 198320 St Petersburg, Krasnoe Selo, Ulitsa Svobody, 50 

Phone: 8-812-132-10-34 

Fax: 132-14-36 



Name: State Auto Transport Enterprise "Elektronavto" 

Address: 194292 St Petersburg, Promzona (Industrial Zone) "Parnas' 

Phone: 8-812-597-63-98 

Fax: 597-63-42 



Name: St Petersburg Administration "Elektronkompleks 1 
Address: 192123 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Radishcheva, 39 
Phone: 8-812-273-49-55 
Fax: 279-04-88 



Name: A Plant at the Central Scientific Research Institute "Elektron' 
Address: 194223 St Petersburg, Prospekt M. Toreza, 68 
Phone: 8-812-552-14-49 
Fax: 552-31-97 



Name: Scientific Research Institute "Girikond" of Science and Production Association "Pozitron" 
Address: 194021 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Kurchatova, 10 
Phone: 8-812-552-91-62 
Fax: 552-60-57 



Name: Russian Scientific Research Institute "Elektronstandart' 
Address: 196143 St Petersburg, Ploshchad Pobedy, 2 
Phone: 8-812-293-34-72 
Fax: 293-45-15 



Name: State Enterprise Central Scientific Research Institute 'Elektron' 
Address: 194223 St Petersburg, Prospekt M. Toreza, 68 
Phone: 8-812-552-36-00 
Fax: 552-31-97 



Name: Open Joint Stock Company "Lakond" 

Address: 187416 Novaya Ladoga, Leningrad Oblast, Ulitsa Suvorova, 47 

U.S. Department of Commerce .'ulv W*H-> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-19 



Phone: 8-263-3-01-56 

Fax: 3-17-40 

Electronic equipment, condensors. 



Name: State Plant "Elektronstandart" 

Address: 188350 Gatchina, Leningrad Oblast, Ulitsa 120th Gatchina Division, 

2nd Industrial Zone 
Phone: 8-81271-2-26-68 
Fax: NA 



Radio 

Name: State Plant for Radio Technical Equipment 
Address: 198330 St Petersburg, Lermontovskiy Prospekt, 54 
Phone: 8-812-251-84-00 
Fax: 251-84-05 



Name: State Enterprise "Navigator" 

Address: 197042 St Petersburg, Malyy Prospekt, 4 

Phone: 8-812-235-18-54 

Fax: 235-45-54 



Name: Production Association "Rossiya" 

Address: 195027 St Petersburg, Sverdlovskaya Naberezhnaya, 44 

Phone: 8-812-225-93-01 

Fax: 226-79-02 



Name: Design Bureau St Petersburg Plant "Rossiya" 
Address: 195160 St Petersburg, 

Sverdlovskaya Naberezhnaya, 44 
Phone: 8-812-225-10-96 
Fax: 226-78-00 



Name: Russian Institute for Radio Navigation and Time 
Address: 193 124 St Petersburg, Proezd Rastrelli, 2 
Phone: 8-812-274-14-88 
Fax: 283-10-33 



Name: Plant "Energiya" 

Address: 197022 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Pionerskaya, 44 

Phone: 8-812-235-54-84 

Fax: 235-47-58 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-20 



Name: "Electromechanical Plant 'Zarya'" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 191 186 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Kazanskaya, 7 
Phone: 8-812-312-73-72 
Fax: 314-58-71 



Name: Experimental Plant "Impul's" 

Address: 198320 St Petersburg, Krasnoe Selo, Kingiseppskoe Shosse, 55 

Phone: 8-812-132-46-20 

Fax: NA 



Name: "Intos" Closed Joint Stock Company 

Address: 197342 St Petersburg, Naberezhnaya Chernoy Reki, 41 

Phone: 8-812-242-22-80 

Fax: 246-90-21 



Name: Plant "Komponent" 

Address: 195271 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Bestuzhevskaya, 10 

Phone: 8-812-540-18-55 

Fax: 544-67-41 



Name: Leningrad State Planning and Technology Institute 
Address: 195009 St Petersburg, Lesnoy Prospekt, 19 
Phone: 8-812-542-74-21 
Fax: NA 



Name: Leningrad Design Bureau for Technological Fittings (Osnashcheniya) 
Address: 197342 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Beloostrovskaya, 28 
Phone: 8-812-242-25-45 
Fax: 242-25-42 



Name: State Enterprise "Mikrotekhnika" 

Address: 197022 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Pionerskaya, 44 

Phone: 8-812-235-15031 

Fax: NA 



Name: Scientific Research Institute for Programmed Systems (Sredstv) 
Address: 196084 St Petersburg, Moskovskiy Prospekt, 108 
Phone: 8-812-294-83-66 
Fax: 298-43-24 



Name: Scientific Research Institute for Regional Information Management Systems 

"Petrokometa" 
Address: 196240 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Krasnoputilovskaya, 1 13, korp 2 

U.S. Department of Commerce Jul\ 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-21 



Phone: 8-812-123-20-79 
Fax: 264-60-22 



Name: St Petersburg Science and Production Enterprise "Piramida" 
Address: 196143 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Ordzhonikidze, 42 
Phone: 8-812-264-66-55 
Fax: 264-60-22 



Name: Science and Production Enterprise "Radar-MMS" Joint Stock Company 
Address: 194214 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Novosel'kovskaya, 37 
Phone: 8-812-393-96-00 
Fax: NA 



Name: "Simvol" Open Joint Stock Company 
Address: 198052 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Egorova, 23-b 
Phone: 8-812-292-48-48 
Fax: 292-20-74 



Name: Scientific Research Institute for Radio Apparatuses 

Address: 199106 St Petersburg, Vasil'evskiy Ostrov (Island), Shkiperskiy Protok (Channel), 19 

Phone: 8-812-356-01-40 

Fax: 352-37-51 



Name: "Trade Sector Machine Building Plant" Joint Stock Company 
Address: 193019 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Fayansovaya, 22 
Phone: 8-812-567-98-88 
Fax: 567-31-43 



Name: Joint Stock Company "Experimental Plant" 

Address: 188350 Gatchina, Leningrad Oblast, Ulitsa 120th Gatchina Division, 1 

Phone: 8-81271-212-32-22 

Fax: NA 



Name: Radio Plant "Svir" 

187710 Lodeynoe Pole, Leningrad Oblast, Prospekt Lenina, 133 

Phone: 8-81264-2-04-11 

Fax: NA 



Communications Equipment 

Name: Scientific Research Institute "Rubin" 

Address: St Petersburg, NFI 

Phone: 8-812-245-37-38 (Same as Scientific Research Institute "Del'ta") 

U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-22 



Fax: NA 



Name: Scientific Research Institute "Masshtab" 
Address: 197342 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Kantemirovskaya, 5 
Phone: 8-812-245-51-65 
Fax: 245-51-65 



Name: "Experimental Design Bureau 'Raduga'" Joint Stock Company 
Address: 197342 St Petersburg, a/ya 3 80,Ulitsa Kantemirovskaya, 12 
Phone: 8-812-245-51-42 
Fax: 245-51-86 



Name: Science and Production Association "Dal'nyaya Svyaz" (Long Distance Communication) 
Address: 197046 St Petersburg, Petrogradskaya Naberezhnaya, 34 
Phone: 8-812-233-55-02 
Fax: 233-43-27 



Name: Scientific Research Institute "Del'ta" 

Address: St Petersburg, NFI 

Phone: 8-812-245-37-38 (Same as Scientific Research Institute "Rubin") 

Fax: NA 



Name: Scientific Research Institute "Neptun" 

Address: 199161 St Petersburg, Vasil'evskiy Ostrov (Island), 7th Line, 78 

Phone: 8-812-213-63-22 

Fax: 350-05-19 



Name: "Plant 'Volna'" Joint Stock Company 

Address: 198095 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Marshala Govorova, 29 

Phone: 8-812-252-09-14 

Fax: 252-22-88 



Name: State Planning Institute 

Address: 197342 St Petersburg, Vyvorgskaya Naberezhnaya, 61 

Phone: 8-812-245-34-81 

Fax: NA 



Name: Scientific Research Institute "Zvezda" 

Address: 198903 St Petersburg, Petrodvorets, Krasnyy Prospekt, 61 

Phone: 8-812-427-54-22 

Fax: 427-92-18 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-23 



Name: Experimental Production Enterprise "Zvukotekhnika" 

Address: 199048 St Petersburg, Vasil'evskiy Ostrov (Island), Malyy Prospekt, 58 

Phone: 8-812-213-74-69 

Fax: NA 



Name: State Plant "Izmeritel 1 " 

Address: 197136 St Petersburg, Chkalovskiy Per., 50 

Phone: 8-812-232-61-52 

Fax: 234-37-86 



Name: Plant "Krasnaya Zarya" 

Address: 194044 St Petersburg, Bol'shoy Sampsonievskiy Prospekt, 60 

Phone: 8-812-542-05-92 

Fax: 541-83-69 



Name: Special Design Bureau "Orion" 

Address: 194044 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Tobol'skaya, 12 

Phone: 8-812-248-41-03 

Fax: 542-92-78 



Name: "Priboy" Closed Joint Stock Company 
Address: 199106 St Petersburg, Shkiperskiy Protok, 14 
Phone: 8-812-217-01-84 
Fax: 356-04-25 



Name: Leningrad Leasing Administration "Radar" 

Address: 197022 St Petersburg, Aptekarskiy Proezd, 6, Kor. A-7 

Phone: 8-812-234-55-20 

Fax: 234-43-65 



Name: State Enterprise "Production and Science Complex 'Severnaya Zarya (Northern Dawn)'" 
Address: 194100 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Kantemirovskaya, 7 
Phone: 8-812-245-54-75 
Fax: 245-42-76 



Name: "Commercial Center Tovakom"' Joint Stock Company 
Address: 197342 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Kantemirovskaya, 4 
Phone: 8-812-245-03-20 
Fax: 245-68-69 



Name: Television Equipment Plant "Ekran" 

Address: 198320 St Petersburg, Kingiseppskoe Shosse, 53 

Phone: 8-812-132-43-67 

U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-24 



Fax: 132-43-03 



Munitions and Special Chemicals 

Name: Leningrad Plant "Sokol" 

Address: 187026 Poselenie (Settlement) Nikol'skoe, Tosnenskogo Rayon, Leningrad Oblast 

Phone: 8-81261-6-60-32,6-60-20 

Fax: 6-62-49 

Products: Cable, gun powder, varnish, paint, chemicals, furniture. 

Name: State Plant imeni Morozova 

Address: 188679 Poselenie (Settlement) imeni Morozova, 

Vsevolzhskogo Rayon, Leningrad Oblast 
Phone: 8-812-703-51-03 
Fax: 703-51-64 
Products: Special chemicals. 

Optics 

Name: Scientific Research Institute for Optical Instrument 

Making for Amateur Photo Equipment 
Address: St Petersburg, NFI 
Phone: 8-812-218-75-26 
Fax: NA 



Name: Scientific Research Institute for Complex Research on 

Optical-Electronic Instruments and Systems 
Address: 188536 Sosnovyy Bor, Leningrad Oblast 
Phone: 8-81269-6-25-17 
Fax: NA 



Land Arms 

Name: Leningrad Automated Lines Design Bureau "Rotor' 
Address: 198097 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Trefoleva, 42 
Phone: 8-812-186-01-88 
Fax: 186-01-88 



Name: Open Joint Stock Company "Special Machine Building" 
Address: 198097 St Petersburg, Prospekt Stachek, 47 (see Kirov Plant) 
Phone: 8-812-252-13-43 
Fax: 184-19-64 



U.S. Department of Commerce Juh 1596 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-25 



Name: State Enterprise Machine Building Plant "Vulkan' 
Address: 197042 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Pionerskaya, 50 
Phone: 8-812-235-07-61 
Fax: 235-64-45 



Name: State Science and Production Firm VNITI 

(All-Russia Scientific Research and Technology Institute) 
Address: 197022 St Petersburg, Malyy Prospekt, PS, 87 
Phone: 8-812-232-10-40 
Fax: 233-18-54 



Name: Leningrad Special Design Bureau for Planning Textile Machinery 
Address: 197042 St Petersburg, Ulitsa Pionerskaya, 50 (see Vulkan Plant) 
Phone: NA 
Fax: NA 



Name: Leningrad Mechanical Plant imeni Karl Libknekht 

Address: 194044 St Petersburg, K-44, Ulitsa Chugunnaya, 14 

Phone: 8-812-292-95-42 

Fax: 542-70-01 

Products: Munitions, automobile parts, wood-working machine tools. 



Name: "Lenprodmash" Joint Stock Company 

Address: 198020 St Petersburg, Prospekt Ogorodnikova, 40 

Phone: 8-812-251-71-31, 251-55-81, 251-71-25, 251-66-13, 251-66-51, 251-38-85 

Fax: 251-69-20 



Name: Scientific Research and Technology Institute of Materials Research 
Address: 193171 St Petersburg, Babushkina, 36, Korp. 1 
Phone: 8-812-560-17-00 
Fax: 560-10-22 



Name: "Transmashproekt" Open Joint Stock Company 

Address: 198005 St Petersburg, Izaylovskiy Prospekt 4 

Phone: 8-812-292-29-92,292-42-01 

Fax: 251-81-38,251-95-42 

Business: Research into the conversion of defense enterprises. 

Polyarnaya Zvezda (Pole Star) Research & Production Association 
Box 40, St. Petersburg, 
198262, Russia 

Alexandr P. Matlakh, Ph.D., General Director 
Phone: (812) 157-12-22, 151-22-66 

U.S.Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-26 



Fax: (812)15721-77 
E-mail: matl@polestar.spb.su 



Zvyozdochka (Little Star) Engineering Enterprise 
Pr. Mashinostroiteley, 12 
Severodvinsk, Arkhangelsk region 
164509, Russia 



U.S. Department of Commerce Julv l^Oo 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 2-27 



CHAPTER 3 - ENTERPRISES OUTSIDE LENINGRAD 
OBLAST AND UPDATES TO SOME 4TH EDITION 

PROFILES 



INDEX: 
NAME OF ENTERPRISE 

CHELYABINSK 

URAL TRAILER JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

IZHEVSK 

SARAPUL RADIO PLANT JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

KALUGA 

OBPNSK RESEARCH AND PRODUCTION ENTERPRISE "TECHNOLOGIYA" 

KAMENSK-URALSKIY 

OKTYABR PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

KAZAN 

SVIYAGA SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

MOSCOW (including MOSCOW OBLAST1 

AEROELEKTRIK JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

ALL-RUSSIAN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF RADIO ENGPNEERING (VNIIRT) 

CENTRAL SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF MACHINE-BUILDING (TsNIImash) 

DESIGN BUREAU OF PRECISION MACHTNE-BUILDING (KBTM) 

MOSCOW CHERNYSHEV STATE MACHINE-BUILDING PRODUCTION ENTERPRISE 

PULSAR SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

SAPFIR SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

TUSHTNO MACHINE-BUILDING DESIGN BUREAU SOYUZ 

NOVOSIBIRSK 

OKSID PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

OMSK 

OMSK MACHINE-BUILDING DESIGN BUREAU JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

ROSTOV-ON-DON 

GORIZONT PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

SARATOV 

SARATOV ORDZI IONIKIDZE PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 



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Enterprise name: URALS TRAILER 
JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: April 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionernoye 
obshchestvo "Uralavtopritsep", Chelyabinsk 
Machine-Building Plant for Trailers, 
Chelyabinsk Machine-Building Automobile 
and Tractor Trailer Plant, ChMZAP 

ADDRESS: 

454038, Chelyabinsk, Russia 
Ulitsa Khlebozavodskaya, 6 
Urals Trailer Joint Stock Company 

Telephone: (011-7-3512) 24-05-44, 24-37- 
54; Telex: 124834 UISSU 
Teletype: 124280 KVARTS 
Fax: (011-7-3512)24-04-54 
E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Urals 
Trailer Joint Stock Company is a World 
War-II era facility that was privatized in 
1993 . The company specializes in the 
production of trailers, both light- and heavy- 
duty types, for passenger cars and truck 
tractors. The company produces heavy-duty 
semitrailers including construction equipment 
hauling, and customized types. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Truck trailers; 
SIC Code: 3523, 3553, 3644, 3644, 3715, 
3799 

FORMER MINISTRY 
SUBORDINATION: Ministry of the 
Agricultural Machinery Industry 

EMPLOYMENT: Total: 3500; Date: 1994 

PRTNCD7AL OFFICERS: 

Yuriy Dmitrovich Koshcheyev, Director 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1943 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Trailers 
and semitrailers for use as heavy-equipment 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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transporters. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES Trailers and 
semitrailers, bogies for semitrailers, motor 
vehicle and agricultural machinery parts and 
accessories, machinery for the cattle 
industry, wood-working tools and hardware. 

key technologh:s/equd?ment 
employed n/a 

conversion projects: n/a 

human resources support n/a 

other relevant information 

N/A 



Enterprise name: SARAPUL RADIO 
PLANT JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionernoye 
obshchestvo "Sarapulskiy radiozavod", 
Sarapul Ordzhonikidze Radio Plant 

ADDRESS: 

427900, Sarapul, Russia 
Ulitsa Gogolya, 40 

Telephone: (011-7-34147) 2-26-33, 2-49- 

08, 9-89-64; Telex: N/A 

Teletype: 755648 ORLENOK 

Fax: (01 1-7-34147) 2-47-09; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Sarapul 
Radio Plant Joint Stock Company has been 
producing communications equipment for 
both military and civil use for more than 50 
years. Under conversion the company has 
expanded production of radios for civil use, 
including models formerly used by the 
military. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Communications 
equipment; SIC Code: 3469, 3565, 3651, 
3663, 3824 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

July 1996 



Ministry of the Radio Industry 
APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Aleksandr Mikhaylovich Polusmak, Director 

OWNERSHIP: Joint stock company 
YEAR ESTABLISHED World War-II era 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

wave radios and other types of 
communications equipment. 



Short- 



CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Radio-and TV- 
broadcasting equipment; household 
radioelectronic apparatus including radio 
receivers, radio/tape-recorders, and 
multiband car radios; radio communications 
equipment including short-wave and VHF 
radio stations, and antennas; money counting 
and packaging machines. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS An Army 
short-wave radio, the Severok, is now being 
produced for civil use. Other conversion 
programs include: the Ural-293, and -334 car 
radio/tape- recorders, and the computer- 
controlled Ural-292 with storage and 
automatic search functions; radio-telephone 
equipment; bank money counting and sorting 
machines; and a laser CD player. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFO. N/A 



Enterprise name: OBNINSK 
TEKHNOLOGIYA RESEARCH AND 
PRODUCTION ENTERPRISE 

LAST UPDATE: April 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Tekhnologiya 
State Research Center at Obninsk, NPO 
Tekhnologiya 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



ADDRESS: 

249020, Obninsk, Kaluga region, Russia 

Tel: (08439) 2-39-15, (08439) 2-39-05 
Fax: (095) 255-22-25, Telex: N/A, E-Mail: 
N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Obninsk 
Tekhnologiya Research and Production 
Enterprise has been a leader in the research 
and development of glass and ceramic 
materials, primarily for aerospace 
applications. It is currently expanding its 
applications to the automotive, shipbuilding 
and metallurgical fields. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: High performance 
aviation and space shuttle materials; SIC 
Code: 2679, 2819, 2824, 2891, 3229, 3296, 
3469, 3559, 3624, 3769 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICER: 

Aleksander G. Romashin, General Director 
Vladimir V. Vikulin, Deputy General Mgr 

OWNERSHIP: State owned 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1959 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Development of non-metallic parts for 
aircraft, including cockpit windshields, 
composite payload flaps, instrument parts, 
honey comb parts for SU-26 and SU-2° 
Tekhnologiya has also been involved in the 
development of ceramic composite armor 
and adiabatic engines. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Russian 
airliners such as IL-62, 1L-Sc\ TU-134, IV- 
154, YAK-40, YAK-42 and the "Buran" 
space shuttle Also glass and ceramic pans 
for civil applications. 

KEY TECHNOLOG1KS FQITPMFN 1 
EMPLOYED: Advanced ceramics. non- 
Mr I** 



flammable polymeric composites for aircraft 
interiors and floor panels, honeycomb 
materials fabrication and isothermal 
glassware pressing. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Obinsk is 
willing to license its technology or enter into 
joint ventures with foreign manufacturers in 
the automobile, marine, ceramic & metal- 
matrix composites, optical and glassware 
industries. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

Officials from Obinsk visited the U.S. as a 
part of the Department of Commerce's 
SABIT Program in October/November 
1995. The enterprise supplied 10% of the 
materials used in the Buran space shuttle. 



Enterprise name: OKTYABR 
PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: 
Proizvodstvennoye Obyedineniye "Oktyabr", 
POOktyabr. 

ADDRESS: 

623400, Kamensk-Uralskiy, Sverdlovsk 
Oblast, Russia 

Tel: (011-7-34378) 3-80-58, 3-16-00 
Telex: N/A; Teletype: 348426 or 348413 
UTES; Fax: (01 1-7-34378) 3-63-72 
E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Oktyabr 
Production Association is a large aviation 
electronics enterprise. Its main product has 
been radio altimeters, but it also has 
produced ship and flight control computers 
and radio navigation aids. Its conversion 
projects are primarily in the area of 
electronic equipment. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electronics; SIC 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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Code: 3553, 3578, 3661, 3812, 3825, 3845 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Radio Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: Total 
12,000; Date: 1992. 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Viktor A. Paramonov, General Director 
Viktor A. Ushkalov, Deputy Gen. Director 
Vladimir K. Frolov, Deputy Gen. Director 
Vladimir V. Vershinin, Chief Engineer 

OWNERSHIP: State-owned 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Airborne 
radio altimeters, ship computers, digital flight 
control computers, surface and air radio 
navigation aids. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Airborne radio 
altimeters for civil aircraft, home radio 
receivers, tape recorders, and indoor 
television antennas. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Magnetic 
therapy equipment, security alarms, 
telegraph communications equipment, bond 
calculating machines, electricity meters, and 
multipurpose woodworking machines. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFO: N/A 



Enterprise name: SVTYAGA 
SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTION 
ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: April 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Nauchno- 
proizvodstvennoye obedineniye "Sviyaga", 

July 1996 



NPO Sviyaga, Kazan Sviyaga 
Electrotechnical Plant, Sviyaga TPO 
(territorialno-proizvodstvennoye 
obedineniye). Key facility: Kazan 
Electrotechnical Plant. 

ADDRESS: 

420107, Kazan, Tatarstan, Russia 
Ulitsa Sverdlova, 50 

Tel: (011-7-8432) 32-76-68,39-94-01 
Telex: N/A; Teletype: 224156 LUNA, 
224113 LUNA; Fax: (011-7-8432) 36-37- 
81; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Sviyaga 
Scientific Production Association specializes 
in producing radionavigation equipment for 
ships. The association also produces a wide 
variety of other machinery products, 
including robots and machine tools, for 
industrial use. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Ship radio- 
navigation equipment; SIC Code: 3089, 
3429, 3534, 3541, 3542, 3563, 3646, 3651, 
3797 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Georgiy G. Agadzhanov, General Director 
A.S. Gilfanov, Plant Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Radionavigation equipment for ships 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Equipment for 
the production and repair of ships, forge- 
press and metal-cutting machine tools, 
robots and manipulators, universal-type 
fittings for the machinery industry, antennas, 
stereophonic equipment, power lighting 
installations, equipment for automobile 
garages, plastic haberdashery articles and 
sporting goods, decorative garlands, wooden 
kitchen utensils, television equipment, 



commercial scales, instruments for the 
control of lighting, door locks. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Security/fire 
signaling devices, electric grills for 
restaurants. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFO. N/A 



Enterprise name: AEROELEKTRIK 
JOINT STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionernoye 
obshchestvo "Aeroelektrik", Moscow 
Dzerzhinets Components Plant (Moskovskiy 
agregatniy zavod Dzerzhinets) 

ADDRESS 

125015, Moscow, Russia 
Ulitsa B. No vodmitrovskaya, 12 

Telephone: (011-7-095) 285-94-50 

Telex: N/A; Teletype: N/A 

Fax: (011-7-095)285-17-25, E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The 

Aeroelektrik Joint Stock Company, known 
prior to May 1993 as the Dzerzhinets 
Components Plant, manufactures 
electrotechnical equipment for aircraft and 
spacecraft. The company also produces pod- 
mounted gun systems for fixed-wing military 
aircraft, and helicopters. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS Electrical 
equipment; SIC Code: 3489, 3511. 3531. 
3546, 3548, 3569, 3621, 3728, 3825, 3829 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Igor Gaviachev. Marketing representative 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Juh 1** 



3-5 



OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Pod- 
mounted gun systems for aircraft and 
helicopters. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: Electric power 
generating systems, electric winches, aircraft 
braking equipment, electric de-icing systems, 
digital control systems for aircraft 
electrotechnical equipment, wind-driven 
electric power generating equipment, 
welding equipment, automatic test and 
diagnostic equipment for the service 
industry, electric hand tools for household 
use, and cable cars (telphers). 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS N/A 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFO N/A 



Enterprise name: ALL-RUSSIAN 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
OF RADIO ENGINEERING (VNIIRT) 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Vserossiyskiy 
nauchno-issledovatelskiy institut 
radiotekhniki, VNIIRT "SKALA". 

ADDRESS: 

107082 Moscow, Russia 
Ulitsa Bolshaya Pochtovaya, 22 

Tel: (011-7-095)267-66-04, 261-41-72; 
Telex: N/A; Teletype: 417375 AKRIL 
Fax: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The All-Russian 
Scientific Research Institute of Radio 
Engineering (VNIIRT) is the primary 
Russian designer of ground-based air 
surveillance radars. It performs scientific 



research and experimental design work on 
radars for both the strategic air defense 
forces and for the ground forces. It has 
devoted much attention to metric-band 
(VHF) radars, which have inherent counter- 
stealth capabilities and are relatively 
unaffected by meteorological obscuration. 
VNIIRT's products also have application to 
civil air traffic control. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Radar design; SIC 
Code: 3663,3812 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN : 

Ministry of the Radio Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Yuriy Minayev, General Director 
Yuriy A. Kuznetsov, General Designer 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Gamma- 
D mobile radar, Kasta-2Ye2 (39N6Ye) low- 
flying target detection decimetric-band 
(UHF) mobile radar, metric-band (VHF) 
ground-based air surveillance radars. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Dual-use 
(military and civil) air surveillance radars. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFO N/A 



Enterprise name: CENTRAL 
SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH INSTITUTE 
OF MACHINE-BUILDING (TsNIIMash) 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Tsentralnyy 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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July 1996 



nauchnoissledvatelskiy institut 
mashinostroyeniya (TsNIIMash) 

ADDRESS: 

141070, Kaliningrad, Russia 
(Moscow Oblast), Ulitsa Pionerskaya, 4 

Tel: (011-7-095) 513-50-00, 513-50-01, 
586-83-90; Telex: 411952 MCC SU: 
Fax: (011-7-095) 274-00-25; 187-18-88; E- 
mail: n/a 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Central 
Scientific Research Institute of Machine- 
Building (TsNIIMash) is one of the primary 
enterprises dealing with Russian spacecraft 
and rocket engineering. It conducts system 
research and development of spacecraft and 
rocket programs. TsNIIMash is one of the 
primary facilities for testing spacecraft and 
spacecraft components for RSC "Energiya" 
and others. It is also involved in theoretical 
and experimental research in the areas of 
aerogasdynamics, heat transfer, thermal 
protection, static and dynamic strength of 
boosters and spacecraft. TsNIImash also 
provides mission control for interplanetary 
probes, manned space stations and 
spacecraft. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Space technology; 
SIC Code: 2819, 2821,3443, 3511, 3569 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN: 

Ministry of General Machine-Building 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 7500; Date: 1995 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Vladimir Utkin, Director 

Nikolai Anfimov, First Deputy Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled (under 
Russian Space Agency) 



YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1946 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Basic, 

exploratory, and applied research of space 
and rocket systems; design and evaluation of 
new systems. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Research in 
support of Russian federal space programs; 
basic, exploratory and applied research of 
economics and scientific space systems; 
testing and evaluation 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: TsNIIMash has many test 
cells and laboratories, including transonic 
and supersonic wind tunnels, piston 
gasdynamic facilities, shock tubes, gas 
dynamic vacuum chambers, electric-arc 
gasdynamic facilities and plasmatronics that 
allows for experimentation in all areas of 
space technology, including endo- and exo- 
atmospheric flight. A 8,300 cubic meter 
space simulation facility provides ample 
room for testing large objects. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: More than 
10 projects are being worked on in the 
environmental, medical and high-tech 
aeronautical fields. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: 

Housing, recreation and child-care facilities 
are provided. 



Enterprise name: DESIGN BUREAU OF 
PRECISION MACHINE-BUILDING 
(KBTM) 

LAST UPDATE November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES; Konstniktorskoye 
byuro tochnogo mashinostroyeniye, K.B 
Tochmash, NPO Tochnost 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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ADDRESS: 

1 17342, Moscow, Russia 
Ulitsa Vvedenskogo, 8 



"Spektr" personal computer. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 



Tel: (011-7-095) 333-64-35 
Telex: N/A; Teletype: N/A 
Fax: (011-7-095)333-55-13 
E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Design 
Bureau for Precision Machine-Building 
develops man-portable surface-to-air missiles 
(SAMs), and is a major developer of medical 
equipment including pace-makers, laser- 
based ophthalmic instruments, and bio- 
feedback relaxation devices. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Surface-to-air 
missiles; SIC Code: 3553, 3575, 3674, 
3812,3842,3845 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Defense Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 
PRINCIPAL OFFICERS N/A 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: "Strela" 
SAM (surface-to- air missiles). 

CTVTL PRODUCT LINES Medical 
equipment including pace-makers, 
ophthalmologcal equipment, neuron 
stimulators, bio-feedback devices, anti- 
allergenic instruments, and equipment for 
disinfecting needles. Other products include 
polychromatic lasers for monitoring ecology 
and for scientific reserarch, automatic food 
packaging equipment, universal 
woodworking machine tools, and the 



CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 



HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 



OTHER RELEVANT INFO: N/A 



Enterprise name: MOSCOW 
CHERNYSHEV STATE MACHINE- 
BUILDING PRODUCTION 
ENTERPRISE 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Gosudarstvennoye 
moskovskoye mashinostroitelnoye 
proizvodstvennoye predpriyatiye 
"V.V.Chernysheva", MPO Chernyshev 

ADDRESS: 

123362, Moscow, Russia 
Ulitsa Vishnevaya, 7 

Tel: (011-7-095)491-58-74, 491-55-44; 
Telex: N/A; Teletype: 417626 ELIKA 
Fax: (011-7-095) 490-56-00, 491-55-22 
E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Moscow 
Chernyshev State Machine-Building 
Production Enterprise produces jet engines 
for MiG fighter aircraft. Currently, it 
produces the fourth generation RD-33 
turbofan jet engine for the MiG-29, and the 
TV7-1 17C turboprop engine for the 11-114 
commercial airliner. The enterprise also 
produces a diversified mix of products for 
agriculture and industry 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Aircraft engines; 
SIC Code: 3496, 3511, 3524, 3553, 3556, 
3724 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDIN. : 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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July 1996 



APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Anatoliy Nikolayevich Napolnov, Director 
OlegN. Tretyakov, Chief Engineer 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled. 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: World War-II era 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES R- 

27F2M-300 jet engine, and the RD-33 
turbofanjet engine. 

CIVTL PRODUCT LINES: TV7-1 17C 
turboprop engines, aircraft starter parts, 
parts and assemblies for equipment used in 
aviation technology for thermal treating and 
coating, riveting presses, lapping equipment 
for rolled ferrous metal, equipment for 
airport ground servicing, specialized metal- 
cutting machine tools, automotive winches, 
shoe repair equipment and other machines 
for the leather and fur industry, parts for 
motor-scooter engines, camping stoves, 
therapeutic equipment for mineral baths, and 
other medical equipment. 

KEY TECHNOL OGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: Boat 
engines, cultivators, household coffee 
grinders, garden hand carts 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

The Moscow Chernyshev State Machine- 
Building Production Enterprise is co-located 
with the Tushino Machine-Building Design 
Bureau Soyuz, a developer and prototype 
manufacturer of aircraft engines. 



Enterprise name: PULSAR SCIENTIFIC 
PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Nauchno- 
proizvodstvennoye obedineniye "Pulsar", 



NPO Pulsar. Key facilities: Pulsar Plant, ND 
Pulsar 

ADDRESS 

105187, Moscow, Russia 
Okruzhnoy Proyezd, 27 

Tel.: (011-7-095) 366-52-01, 369-48-62, 
369-04-81, 369-03-33; Telex: N/A 
Teletype: 111529 GIBPJD 
Fax: (011-7-095) 366-55-83; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Pulsar 
Scientific Production Association is a major 
Russian facility for the design, development, 
and experimental production of 
semiconductor devices based on germanium, 
silicon, and gallium arsenide. Pulsar has 
developed a wide variety of diodes, 
transistors, and integrated circuits, as well as 
photolithographic and other types of 
semiconductor production equipment. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Semiconductors; 
SIC Code: 3523, 3575, 3621, 3625, 3651, 
3674, 3679, 3873 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Electronics Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Yuriy P. Dokuchaev, General Director 
Gennadiy A. Babayan, Plant Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES 

Semiconductors 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Germanium, 
silicon, and gallium arsenide diodes, 
transistors, and integrated circuits, band-pass 
filters for TV receivers, low-noise amplifiers 
for satellite communications receivers, 
satellite dish antennas, electronic wrist 
watches and clocks, AC electric motors. 
personal computers, devices and machines 
for agriculture. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES EQITPMFNT 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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EMPLOYED: N/A 
CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 
HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 
OTHER RELEVANT INFO: N/A 



Enterprise name: SAPFIR SCIENTIFIC 
RESEARCH INSTITUTE 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Nauchno- 
issledovatelskiy institut "Sapfir", Nil Sapfir. 

ADDRESS: 

105318, Moscow, Russia 
Ulitsa Shcherbakovskaya, 53 

Tel: (011-7-095) 369-30-36; Telex: N/A; 
Teletype: 207190 SILAN 
Fax: (011-7-095)365-15-52 
E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Sapfir 
Scientific Research Institute specializes in the 
development of diodes, transistors, and 
monolithic and hybrid integrated circuits 
based on silicon, germanium and gallium 
arsenide. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Semiconductors; 
SIC Code: 3674 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN.: 

Ministry of the Electronics Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Anatoliy Vasilevich Golomedov, Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Aircraft 
indicator systems, semiconductors for 
military systems. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Diodes, 
transistors, integrated circuits, aircraft 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



indicator systems, and other electronic and 
semiconductor devices. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION: 

The Optron plant, an experimental plant 
affiliated with Sapfir, is collocated with the 
institute. 



Enterprise name: TUSHINO 
MACHINE-BUILDING DESIGN 
BUREAU SOYUZ 

LAST UPDATE: April 1996 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Tushinskoye 
mashinostroitelnoye konstruktorskoye byuro 
"Soyuz". 

ADDRESS 

123362, Moscow, Russia 
Ulitsa Vishnevaya, 7 

Tel: (011-7-095) 491-58-65 (Gen. 
Designer), 491-58-33 (Dpty. Gen. Dsgnr. & 
head of Marketing), 491-58-01 (Program 
Mgr.); Telex: N/A; Teletype: N/A; Fax: 
(011-7-095) 490-21-54; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Tushino 
Machine-Building Design Bureau Soyuz 
develops, tests, and manufactures prototypes 
of aircraft gas turbine engines and provides 
support for serial production and 
maintenance of them. It also develops gas 
turbine engines for non-aircraft applications, 
portable power generating units, and other 
types of industrial machines. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS Aircraft engine 

July 1996 



3-10 



design. 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT 

Total: 1,000; Date: 1993 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

R.V. Nusberg, General Designer 
Vladimir N. Ruzin, Deputy General Designer 
Vyacheslav A. Strashelyuk, Program Mgr., 
Aleksandr A. Sergeyev, Head of Marketing 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED Pre-1950 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Soyuz 
has been associated with the development of 
gas turbine engines designed by Klimov in 
St. Petersburg and Tumanskiy (also known 
as Soyuz) in Moscow. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Development 
of gas turbine engines for aircraft, and for 
industrial applications, portable power 
generating units, power tillers with 
attachments, street cleaning machines, 
concrete mixers, and woodworking 
machines. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS N/A 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

The Tushino Machine-Building Design 
Bureau Soyuz is collocated with the 
Chernyshev Moscow Machine-building 
Production Association and functions as its 
pilot production facility. 



Enterprise name: OKSID 
PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Novosibirskoye 
proizvodstvennoye obedineniye "Oksid", PO 
Oksid 

ADDRESS: 

630102, Novosibirsk, Russia 
Ulitsa Kirova, 82 

Tel: (011-7-3832) 66-72-34, 66-83-92, 66- 
64-83, 66-72-36 (Special Design Bureau), 
Telex: N/A; Teletype: 1331 1 1 FARAD A 
Fax: (01 1-7-3832) 66-71-71; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Oksid 
Production Association, which comprises a 
special design bureau and a long-established 
radio components plant, produces mainly 
capacitors and other electrical components 
for radio equipment, and consumer products. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Electrical parts, 
SIC Code: 3069, 3423, 3465, 3469, 3613, 
3675 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Electronics Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 

Ivan Stepanovich Anichkin. General Director 
V. T. Metelev, Director of the Special 
Design Bureau 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED I950's 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINKS 



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Capacitors. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Aluminum, 
niobium, and tantalum capacitors, resistors, 
transformers, coils, fuses, and plastic articles 
for power distribution apparatus; Consumer 
goods including scales, hair curlers, batteries, 
electric soldering irons, accessory articles for 
automobiles, household radioelectronic 
apparatus, and toys. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS N/A 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFO N/A 



the control systems. The bureau also designs 
electrohydraulic systems for diesel engines, 
and control systems for industrial power 
installations. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Aircraft engines 
and engine parts; SIC Code: 3724 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDIN. : 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT: N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

A. Kulkov, Chief Designer 

OWNERSHIP: Joint Stock Company 
YEAR ESTABLISHED: 1947 



Enterprise name: OMSK MACHINE- 
BUILDING DESIGN BUREAU JOINT 
STOCK COMPANY 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Aktsionernoye 
obshchestvo "Omskoye mashinostroitelnoye 
konstruktorskoye byuro". 

ADDRESS: 

644116, Omsk, Russia 
Ulitsa Gertsena, 312 

Tel: (011-7-3812) 21-62-38, 22-94-40, 29- 
14_40, 24-04-24; Telex: N/A; Teletype: 228 
SILA; Fax: N/A; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Omsk 
Machine-Building Design Bureau Joint 
Stock Company designs and develops 
automatic control systems for aircraft gas 
turbine engines, as well as electronic, 
hydromechanical, and optical components of 



MILITARY PRODUCT LINES: Control 
systems and components for gas turbine 
engines installed in aircraft used for military 
transport including the An-22, An-72A, An- 
124 (Ruslan),the Ilyushin-76MD, the Mi-26 
and other helicopters. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES: Electronic, 
hydromechanical, and optical components of 
gas turbine engine control systems including 
gear, vane and centrifugal pumps, 
electropneumatic transducers, meters, 
actuators, sensors, governors, valves, 
distributors, pressure relays, airborne 
indicators; food-related washing, cleaning, 
and sorting machines and other equipment 
for canning and preserving food; components 
for motor vehicle refuelling stations. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED: Titanium alloys, high- 
temperature graphite, graphitized and 
erosion-resistant coatings. 

CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 



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HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 



OTHER RELEVANT INFO: N/A 



Enterprise name: GORIZONT 
PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 

ALTERNATE NAMES: Rostovskoye 
proizvodstvennoye obedineniye "Gorizont", 
PO Gorizont. Key facility: Gorizont Design 
Bureau 

ADDRESS: 

344068, Rostov-na-Donu, Russia 
Prospekt Oktyabrya, 32 

Tel: (011-7-8632) 31-53-80, 31-53-81, 38- 

67-33; Telex: N/A;Teletype: 123 1 1 18 
MRJS; Fax: N/A; E-Mail: N/A 

GENERAL OVERVIEW The Gorizont 
Production Association primarily produces 
radars and navigation equipment for 
shipboard use. Two models of maritime 
radars, the Nayada-5 and the Yenisey, went 
into production in 1991 in a joint venture 
with a British firm and have been produced 
for domestic use and export. Gorizont plans 
to convert some of its space to the 
production of medical equipment and 
household electronics. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Ship radars; SIC 
Code: 3444, 3561, 3625, 3645, 3812, 3812, 
3944 



Viktor A. Spiridonov, General Director 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Ship 
radars and navigation equipment for military 
vessels. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Ship radars and 
navigation equipment, accessories and 
fittings for shipboard instrumentation, audio 
systems, medical equipment, musical 
instruments (percussion), household lighting 
articles, mechanical equipment for 
restaurants, household articles powered by 
electric motors, knives, toys and decorations 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED N/A 

CONVERSION PROJECTS Household 
electronics products and medical equipment. 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT N/A 

OTHER RELEVANT INFORMATION 

In 1991, Gorizont formed ajoint venture 
with the British firm Kelvin Hughes to 
produce ship radars, whereby Kelvin Hughes 
would supply electronic parts. 



Enterprise name: SARATOV 
ORDZHONIKIDZE PRODUCTION 
ASSOCIATION 

LAST UPDATE: November 1995 



FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. : 

Ministry of the Shipbuilding Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 
PRINCIPAL OFFICERS 



ALTERNATE NAMES: Saratovskoye 
proizvodstvennoye obedineniye "S. 
Ordzhonikidze", Saratov PO Ordzhonikidze 

ADDRESS 

410005, Saratov. Russia 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
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UlitsaB.Sadovaya, 239 

Saratov Ordzhonikidze Production CONVERSION PROJECTS: N/A 

Association 

HUMAN RESOURCES SUPPORT: N/A 

Tel: (011-7-8452) 24-21-32, 91-82-01, 24- 

49-96; Telex: N/A; Teletype: 241 144, OTHER RELEVANT INFO: N/A 

241323 OKA; Fax: (011-7-8452) 24-37-56; 

E-Mail: N/A 



GENERAL OVERVIEW: The Saratov 
Ordzhonikidze Production Association 
produces aircraft instruments, including 
gyroscopes, analog computers, and a variety 
of gauges and indicators. 

PRIMARY BUSINESS: Aircraft 
instruments; SIC Code: 3634, 3679, 3812, 
3823, 3825, 3944 

FORMER MINISTRY SUBORDN. 

Ministry of the Aviation Industry 

APPROXIMATE EMPLOYMENT N/A 

PRINCIPAL OFFICERS: 

Adolf Trofimovich Kazakov 

OWNERSHIP: State-controlled 

YEAR ESTABLISHED: N/A 

MILITARY PRODUCT LINES Aircraft 
instruments. 

CIVIL PRODUCT LINES Aircraft 
instruments including azimuth, distance, 
banking, and pitch indicators, analog 
computers, gyroscopes, altimeters, linear and 
angular acceleration gauges and 
oscillographs. The association also produces 
other electrical measuring instruments and 
products, and consumer goods including 
mechanical juicers, toys, and souvenirs. 

KEY TECHNOLOGIES/EQUIPMENT 
EMPLOYED N/A 

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CHAPTER 4 - INVESTING IN RUSSIAN DEFENSE CONVERSION: 
OBSTACLES AND OPPORTUNITIES 

I. INTRODUCTION 

In June 1992, the United States and the Russian Federation declared their intention to make 
cooperation in advancing defense conversion a high priority. Both countries recognized that 
Russian defense conversion was key to building a more economically prosperous world and 
assuring world peace. Among other things, they agreed to facilitate the exchange of information 
on conversion enterprises and to disseminate that information to potential business partners. The 
Russian Defense Business Directory was designed as a first step towards meeting that commitment. 



A. DEFENSE CONVERSION BACKGROUND 

1 . Definition 

"Defense conversion," in the view of the U.S. component of the Defense Conversion 
Committee, is the transfer of defense production capabilities to non-defense production, 
either non-defense industrial products (e.g. pumps and valves) or consumer goods. 
However, according to the Law on Defense Conversion of the Russian Federation, the 
Russia has a much broader definition, which includes the possibility of a plant maintaining 
its defense production while expanding its non-defense production for other purposes, 
including the generation of hard currency exports. (See section C. 1 .a. for a discussion of 
this issue.) 

2. Overview of Defense Industry 

The former Soviet Union developed an immense defense industrial base with enterprises 
scattered throughout the various republics. About 70 percent are located in the Russian 
Federation. Russia contains more than 100 major defense plants; thousands of subsystem, 
component, and materials producers; and more than 1 ,000 military research, 
development, and test facilities. At its peak in the late 1980s, Russian defense industry 
employed some five to seven million workers, out of a total industrial labor force of 25 
million. In addition to producing weapons, the defense industry has long been a large 
producer of civilian goods, producing all of the former Soviet Union's radios, televisions, 
VCRs, most of the refrigerators and washing machines, as well as a large share of the 
country's production equipment. 

Defense enterprises in the former Soviet Union differ from their Western counterparts in 
several ways. They tend to be larger than plants in the West which produce similar items. 
The plants typically include on-site facilities for much of the component fabrication, which 
in the West would be subcontracted to other companies. Former Soviet defense 
enterprises also have traditionally had infrastructure responsibilities not found in the West, 
including schools, housing, and other social and cultural services. In addition, because 
central government organizations historically assured Uiat defense enterprises received 

U.S. Department of Commerce Jvilv 1^ 

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priority access to available supplies, investment, engineers and distribution of production, 
enterprise managers never learned to fend for themselves. 

Current Situation in Defense Industry 

Thus far, progress in defense industry conversion has been slow. Many defense 
enterprises are barely surviving due to cuts in weapons orders and insufficient funding to 
shift to civil production. Defense enterprises continue to be stymied, as they have been for 
the past several years, by a vast range of problems with respect to conversion. Most plant 
managers are faced with implementing massive structural changes in the management and 
operation of their plants and relationships with suppliers. The majority are having limited 
success, given their lack of expertise with the new products, the chaos in the economy, 
their lack of skill in dealing with a quasi-market environment, the difficulty of establishing 
new supply chains, and the lack of Western investment or domestic financial support for 
costly re-tooling. Meanwhile, defense plants have built up huge bank debts, as well as 
debts to other enterprises, while attempting to meet their payrolls and continue operations. 

Russian leaders have recognized the high cost of conversion,but they are unable to provide 
the magnitude of investment resources necessary to assist defense enterprises undergoing 
conversion. Although their expectations have dropped considerably, Russian leaders 
continue to count on Western investment and foreign assistance to increase civilian 
production in defense enterprises. In the meantime, however, the Russian Federation is 
pursuing arms sales as a means to earn hard currency-partially to finance defense 
conversion. 

Many Russian defense enterprises now are in the process of privatization. The Russian 
Federation will retain possession of those weapons production facilities it deems critical to 
future weapons production, but the government has adopted a decree permitting 80 percent 
of all defense enterprises to privatize. The government retains the right to retain 
ownership of a significant portion of the shares in privatized defense enterprises. A 
number of large defense enterprises have begun the privatization process. An important 
side-effect of the privatization process in the defense sector has been the creation of 
numerous small and medium-size private companies from the bodies of large defense 
enterprises. (See Chapter 6 for a summary of the privatization program.) 



B. GENERAL OBSTACLES 

There are numerous studies and case histories available for the U.S. businessperson 
considering investment in Russia. Therefore, the following discussion only highlights some 
of the more significant generic barriers to doing business in Russia. The discussion is 
designed to alert the individual to some of the factors that he or she should address when 
developing a proposal. Good business practices require careful evaluation of all the 
elements; detailed knowledge of whom one is doing business with, and a clear understanding 
of the risks. This is especially true in the constantly evolving Russian commercial 
environment. The U.S. - Russian Bilateral Investment Treaty (BIT), ratified by the U.S. 
Senate on August 1 1 , 1992 but still awaiting ratification by the Russian parliament, is 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

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intended to alleviate many of these generic obstacles. (See Chapter 6 for details on the BIT.; 

In 1992, the Commerce Department established a business information service "BISNIS to 
assist U.S. investors (phone: (202) 482-4655; fax: (202) 482-2293; E-Mail: 
BISNIS1@USITA.GOV). The Department strongly encourages interested parties to contact 
this office as a first step, and to see Chapter 7 for other possible sources of assistance. 

In addition, the U.S. -Russia Business Development Committee includes five additional 
working groups to foster increased commercial cooperation between U.S. and Russian 
firms. These working groups include: Foreign Trade Regulations, Investment and 
Commercial Projects, Industrial Cooperation and Trade Promotion, Business 
Facilitation, and Standards. A complete listing of all Working Groups and points of contact 
are also contained in Chapter 7. 

1 . Infrastructure 

Authorities commonly cite infrastructure problems in die areas of telecommunications and 
transportation as major obstacles to doing business in Russia. Although Western firms 
have announced plans to assist in the development of a modern telecommunications system 
in Russia and the other Newly Independent States (NIS), communications limitations will 
continue to hamper business activity for some time. Transportation systems in Russia are 
inadequate, both for the distribution of goods and services, as well as the movement of 
people. 

2. Laws and Regulations 

Among the most serious obstacles inhibiting Western investment is the fluid situation in 
government regulations affecting business. Although the Russian legal system has 
abandoned many of the rules and procedures of the Soviet system, it continues to develop 
the laws and institutions necessary for a market economy to function, such as guarantees 
and definitions of property rights. Today, there are bodies of conflicting, overlapping, 
and rapidly changing laws, decrees, and regulations affecting both domestic and 
international commerce. As a result, these laws are inadequately communicated, 
understood, and enforced. Therefore, U.S. business persons are advised to obtain legal 
counsel that is familiar with the dynamics of Russian legislation. The Department of 
Commerce has a legal text service available dirough the National Technical Information 
Service (see Chapter 9). One of the most pressing concerns for Western investors is 
property ownership. Existing Russian laws on ownership regarding ownership by Western 
investors of land or buildings are unclear. Without definitive ownership rights, some 
Western firms have declined or even refused to do business. Regional governments 
sometimes complicate business operations by imposing laws and regulations mat contradict 
federal ones. Moreover, local legal and regulatory regimes vary widely regarding 
foreign trade and investment ties, although more and more are striving to improve their 
regions' business climate. 

Russian import taxes also may impede Western exports. Moscow raised import tariffs to 
average rates of 13-15 percent, with sharply higher rates on mam consumer and 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv I 1 ** 

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manufactured goods. In addition, many luxury goods are subject to an excise tax that in 
some cases is set at nearly 100 percent. Thirdly, most Russian imports are liable to the 23 
percent VAT, which is levied on the value of the product plus any import tariff and excise 
tax. Russia, however, provides a number of exemptions to import taxes. For example, 
imports of food and other necessities are not subject to the VAT. Moreover, Russian 
officials may soon offer additional import tax breaks to foreign firms that boost their direct 
investments in Russia. U.S. companies should check with BISNIS for the most recent 
information. 

3. Financial Considerations 

Russia's nascent banking and financial infrastructure, and high inflation often create 
difficulties for some businesses operation in Russia. The situation is improving steadily, 
however, and few firms are unable to find ways around these difficulties—although at 
times it requires a great deal of persistence and creativity. These issues have also 
complicated the ability of Western firms to repatriate profits. It is advisable to determine 
payment options and profit repatriation strategies prior to investment. The Finance and 
Counter trade Division in the U.S. Department of Commerce [Room H-l 104, phone: 
(202) 482-4434, Fax: (202) 482-5702] offers advice on methods and techniques that can be 
used, given that Russian enterprises frequently lack hard currency. 

4. Materials and Supplies 

Maintaining adequate sources of materials and supplies will be difficult in light of Russia's 
current political and economic climate, particularly in view of the breakdown of the 
distribution system throughout Russia and the NIS. Although supply problems did exist 
under the command system, defense facilities could seek help from their ministries and 
other bureaucratic oversight organizations when problems arose. Now that the command 
system has been dismantled, supply disruptions have increased and managers are generally 
on their own to devise solutions. 

5. Office Facilities and Visa Problems 

U.S. firms attempting to do business in Russia commonly complain about the difficulties in 
obtaining visas and adequate office space. The bureaucracy and delay involved in 
obtaining visas are a particular concern for smaller firms which cannot afford the high cost 
of establishing a resident office. For those firms with enough resources, office space often 
is not readily available. The leadership of both countries recognizes these problems and 
are working to resolve them. The Department of Commerce has also established 
American Business Centers (ABCs) in several cities of the NIS. A Trade and Investment 
Center is currently operating at the Commercial Section of the U.S. Embassy in Brussels. 
The ABCs offer a variety of services to visiting business persons for a small fee. 

6. Culture 

Other obstacles faced by many Western companies engaging in trade and investment in 
Russia include the lack of a business culture and misunderstandings on the part of Russians 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

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regarding Western companies. Many Russians still lack even a basic knowledge of how 
markets operate, from the role of profits to proper business ethics. Russians often view 
Western firms as having very deep pockets. As a result, U.S. companies may find 
themselves significantly overcharged for services. In addition, this kind of business 
environment engenders illegal activity of every sort, including fraud. U.S. companies 
must exercise extreme caution in all their business ventures in Russia, taking care to 
investigate the legitimacy of partners and, in the absence of legal protections, which are 
taken for granted in the West, to obtain guidance or representation in the drafting of 
contracts. 

7. United States Antidumping Laws 

While more aptly characterized as a benchmark for, than as an "obstacle" to, increased 
trade, U.S. and Russian businesses must understand and comply with various U.S. laws 
when structuring business deals. For example, U.S. law provides for the protection of 
American manufacturers from unfair foreign trade practices. Manufacturers who believe 
that foreign competitors are "dumping" merchandise in the United States or are being 
subsidized by foreign governments may file for relief with the U.S. Department of 
Commerce's International Trade Administration (ITA) and the U.S. International Trade 
Commission (ITC). 

"Dumping" generally refers to the selling of goods in the U.S. market at prices lower than 
the prices at which comparable goods are sold in the domestic market of an exporter. 
These sales must cause or threaten material injury to a competing U.S. industry. 
"Subsidies" are direct and indirect grants on the production or export of goods. They may 
occur in many forms, including direct cash benefits, credits against taxes, and loans with 
artificially low interest rates. 

The U.S. antidumping legislation provides for duties to be levied on goods "dumped" on 
the U.S. market in order to discourage the sale of merchandise in the United States at "less 
than fair value" where such sales cause or threaten "material injury" to a U.S. industry. 
For more information, contact ITA's Office of Investigations [phone: (202) 482-5403. fax: 
(202)482-1059]. 



C. BARRIERS UNIQUE TO DEFENSE CONVERSION 

Although the Russian Federation relies heavily on Western investment to help fund the 
defense conversion program, serious problems hinder the efforts of Western investors who 
want to work with defense enterprises. Some of the problems are caused by contusion over 
who is authorized to make decisions over enterprises and sometimes lack of interest on the 
part of some local enterprise managers. Misunderstandings between Western firms and 
Russian enterprise directors have fueled the spread of rumors and convoluted excuses to 
explain apparent failure. The problems discussed below are representative of those affecting 
all potential Western investors in Russian defense enterprises. 

1 . Authority 

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The ultimate authority to approve or disapprove a deal with a Russian defense enterprise 
depends on the situation of a given enterprise. The central government previously had 
responsibility for all such actions because, through the former Russian Ministry of Industry, 
it owned nearly every defense enterprise in Russia. Today, however, the lines of ownership 
are not so clear. Privatized enterprises have the right to make their own decisions and other 
defense enterprises now are at least nominally the property of the Russian State Property 
Committee. The successor to the Ministry of Industry, the State Committee for the Defense 
Sectors of Industry now the Ministry of Defense Industry, also continues to have influence 
over some plants. 

People experienced in doing business in Russia have frequently suggested that the lines of 
authority with any potential partner be thoroughly investigated and that the Russian partner in 
a business transaction be responsible for obtaining the necessary Russian government 
approvals. 

Lacking guidance from the central government, defense industrialists as well as local and 
regional officials are increasingly asserting their own autonomy and independently seeking 
foreign aid and investment. Regional and city governments and defense industrial managers 
and apparatchiks have created defense conversion support groups and have increased their 
role as players in the conversion process. Clearly, U.S. industry needs to be extremely 
cautious in negotiating business arrangements, ensuring that they have consulted with all the 
applicable and ultimate authorities. 

These layers of authority have presented formidable obstacles. In addition to the State 
Committees on the Defense Sectors of Industry, other central government authorities 
involved in conversion policy include: the Ministry of Economics, Ministry of Defense, 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Economic Relations, Ministry of Higher 
Education and Science, and the Interdepartmental Analytic Center. (See Chapter 10 - 
Russian Government Authorities Involved in Defense Conversion.) 

2. Management Practices 

Successful commercial development and conversion will ultimately depend on the ability 
of enterprise managers to break with past practices. Defense enterprise managers will find 
that most of the management practices developed under the planned economy of the 
former Soviet Union will be of little use in a market economy. Under the Soviet system, 

Managers were primarily concerned with meeting a production target assigned by 
central planning authorities who judged performance by indicators such as 
percentage of plan fulfilled or actual output level. Such criteria caused distortions 
and inefficiencies as managers sought to maintain output at the expense of quality, 
investment in new technology, and labor efficiency. 

Enterprise managers had little knowledge of or concern for the actual costs of 
making their products. The state routinely confiscated profits above state-set 
levels while making up shortfalls in profits leading the enterprise manager to 
virtually disregard the costs of production. 

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Because of the high priority given to national defense, defease industries received 
the highest quality raw materials and had preferential access to the transportation 
and distribution networks for delivering materials. At the same time, defease 
enterprise managers were lauded by the central authorities for their management 
abilities, a factor that makes these managers less willing to change their practices 
to meet market economy needs. 

The central authorities told enterprises who would provide their supplies and to 
whom they were to deliver their product. 

Central authorities rather than market forces determined the prices for products 
delivered from the plant. Consequently, managers had little knowledge or 
concern on how to price their products. 

Managers treated labor as an inexhaustible commodity, and there were no 
incentives to develop an efficient work force or to economize on labor. Thus, 
managers tolerated indifferent labor discipline, poor attendance, high rates of 
alcoholism, and theft from the shop floor. 

Soviet managers typically did not replace equipment until it became obsolete, and 
on occasion, they sequestered and stockpiled replacement equipment without 
putting it into use. They resisted installing new equipment because of the resulting 
downtime, and central planners frequently discouraged such modernization by 
failing to lower the plant's production target for the period involved. 

3. Inter-enterprise Debt 

Many defense plants have remained afloat by relying on Central Bank credits and by 
running up debts with other enterprises. Financially strapped enterprises could not pay 
their suppliers which created a chain reaction of unpaid debts that reverberated throughout 
the entire industrial sector. 

4. Resistance to Change 

Some defense industry managers and workers are still resistant to the idea of conversion. 
The Russian Federation is determined to continue some military production, albeit at a 
greaUy reduced level, and some enterprise managers hope to gain those contracts and 
continue to produce military hardware, thus avoiding conversion. Others are not 
convinced that conversion is necessary, believing that Russia eventually will abandon 
defense conversion and economic reform and that they again will be required to produce 
weapons. 

In addition, some defease industry employees oppose conversion because defense 
production was traditionally viewed as the more prestigious sector of the economy. 
Nevertheless, their resistance has weakened over the past few years as die special 
privileges associated with defense work— higher wages, special bonuses, and awards— have 
disappeared. Recently, in fact, wages at defense plants have become lower than those at 

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other industrial enterprises. 

Another aspect that could cause problems in the conversion process is the possibility of 
unemployment and displacement of persons caused by the downsizing of defense industry. 
Since the Russian Federation previously adhered to a policy of near full employment, it 
has little experience with the demands associated with the large scale retraining and job 
placement of defense industry employees. 

5. Infrastructure/Social Support 

Three major infrastructure issues serve as barriers to defense conversion: 1) social 
services associated with employment; 2) difficulty in industrial conversion; and 3) 
environmental and occupational safety hazards. Besides providing employment, defense 
facilities also have been responsible for supplying numerous other social infrastructure 
benefits including: housing, schools, day care, medical, and other community support 
functions. Many enterprises have been kept in operation through subsidies because of the 
social necessity of these services. Currently, some regions are in the process of 
transferring responsibility for such services to the local government, although plant 
managers often feel responsible for their workers and have been reluctant to give up 
responsibility for these services-particularly since local authorities are struggling to find a 
way to finance them. The Privatization decree instructs Russian enterprises not to include 
social and cultural infrastructure items when placing a value on the enterprise's assets. 

Conversion projects may continue to provide employment for a number of these people; 
however, many are at risk of losing not only their jobs, but also their basic needs (i.e. , 
shelter). Due to the housing shortage, as well as the lack of a private housing market, 
many Russians have no means of finding alternative housing. Again, defense facilities will 
be particularly hard hit because of the number of employees that they currently sustain. 
Thus, U.S. businesses need to be aware of and learn about these potentially overriding 
considerations in developing conversion proposals, and to include perhaps provisions for 
temporarily sustaining certain aspects of the social support system. 

A second physical infrastructure barrier to defense conversion is the conversion process in 
and of itself. The experience of defense industry enterprises around the world indicates 
that attempts to re-tool military production lines to produce civilian goods are frequently 
unsuccessful. In the United States when defense orders fall, defense firms usually become 
smaller, sell out to or merge with another firm, or go out of business. Commercial 
markets are significantly different from the defense customers that managers have learned 
how to satisfy in such areas as cost and quality requirements, maintenance and service, 
marketing and supplier networks, the length of production runs, and the demands for . 
technology. People, physical equipment, buildings, and land are flexible and adaptable; 
institutions, management, and organizations are rigid. 

The general assessment of several experts on Russian defense conversion is that it will be 
difficult to convert an entire existing facility to civilian production at one time. Potential 
joint venture partners and other investors may be more successful in targeting a specific 
portion of the production line or "corner" of the plant for a project. Some have even 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

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suggested that successful conversion could involve establishing a new organization or 
building a new facility near the existing one and staffing it selectively from the existing 
enterprise. Decisions on how to structure a specific transaction, how to finance it (e.g. , 
pursue a joint venture, acquire an equity interest in the enterprise, lease the facility;, and 
where to market (e.g., for the Russian industrial and consumer market, for export to 
foreign markets) are best left to the parties to the transaction and what the Russian 
Federation will allow in the case of heretofore state-owned enterprises. 

A third infrastructure factor would be the current and looming environmental and 
occupational safety hazards associated with many defense facilities. Defense plants have a 
disproportionate share of heavy industrial waste problems, and many sites are already 
severely contaminated. Western firms may not want to become responsible for the 
extremely high cost of cleaning up these sites. In addition, they may not want to expose 
their workers to the potentially harmful side effects of these polluted environments. 

6. Divergent Expectations 

In recent years, a host of Western investors have come to Russia to explore possibilities 
for investment or cooperation with local defense enterprises. However, relatively few 
deals have actually been concluded. Problems between Western investors and Russian 
defense enterprise directors stem from a number of factors, some related to the 
expectations of Western investors and others related to the expectations—or lack thereof- 
of Russian managers. Sharply conflicting expectations surface when Western investors 
run across enterprise directors who have no interest in conversion projects or foreign 
cooperation in general. According to articles in the Russian press, some enterprise 
directors are not interested in conversion projects at all because they expect a return to the 
"old days" and want to be prepared again to produce arms. Western firms interested in 
these facilities will have to wait for new management. 

Russian officials, both from the government and from defense industry, take great 
pride in the capability and advanced technology of Soviet-designed weapons. 
Russians typically regard their defense industry as the most technologically advanced 
sector of the economy and as capable of matching or exceeding the West. As a result. 
Russian defense industry managers generally seek Western investment to help them 
produce a high-tech product-most likely closely related to their previous military 
production— for export. Western business persons, on the other hand, are frequendy 
interested in a project to produce civilian goods for the sizeable Russian market and 
frequendy regard Russian technology as considerably out-of-date. 

Another source of conflicting expectations surfaces when Western firms appear, in 
Russian eyes, to be going after the "crown jewels" of a particular enterprise. Several 
Russian enterprise directors and academics believe that Western business persons are 
interested only in stealing their advanced technology and state secrets radier than engaging 
in real cooperation. Thus, U.S. companies will find that some potential partners harbor a 
great deal of suspicion regarding American motives. In a typical scenario, a Western firm 
will propose a joint venture with a profitable division of an otherwise-unprofitable 
enterprise. Some enterprise directors balk at Uiis approach because it would mean during 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv l^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 4-9 



managerial control of this division with the new joint venture. According to a 
representative of the State Committee of the Defense Sectors of Industry, some managers 
are refusing to relinquish control over their best divisions because they would be left 
managing a struggling complex of little real value. The enterprise director prefers to talk 
about deals with his less-attractive divisions in hopes of boosting their value. The Western 
investors, not surprisingly, are less interested in such proposals. 

Despite these obstacles, deals can and are being made, but successful negotiations require 
imagination, persistence, and demonstrations of confidence and genuine interest in mutual 
benefits. U.S. and Russian business persons need to understand, yet quickly get beyond, 
certain stereotypical criticisms: Russian enterprise managers frequendy complain that 
American business persons are interested only in "kicking the tires" rather than discussing 
business deals seriously. On the other hand, Western business persons complain that the 
Russian "projects" they are asked to invest in are merely thoughts or concepts at best. 

This Directory can help U.S. businesses learn about Russian enterprises and identify those 
of interest. Before traveling to Russia, however, the U.S. companies might well want to 
communicate their interest and ask whether the enterprise has prepared a business plan 
providing the detailed information typically required before businesses and financial 
institutions in the West engage in serious negotiations. If the enterprise has not yet 
prepared such a plan, there are several organizations in Russia that can assist the 
enterprise, including the DOD-funded International Executive Service Corps (IESC). 
IESC Defense Conversion teams are located in Nizhniy Novgorod and Moscow. See 
Chapter 7 for points of contact, etc. Once business plans have been prepared, Russian 
enterprises can more reasonably anticipate serious business discussions, particularly with 
the Western firms that will have previously noted their interest. 



D. OPPORTUNITIES 

1 . Quantitative and Qualitative Factors 

Several positive factors regarding the Russian economy enhance the potential benefits from 
investments in Russia. First, the sheer size and scope of the Russian market provides 
opportunities for a wide variety of products. The total Russian population is 
approximately 150 million. It is well known that Russian consumers were deprived of 
many basic consumer goods and are now eager to acquire Western products. Although 
defense conversion may not provide immediate availability for some of these products, the 
channeling of industrial productivity to non-defense related items will provide a myriad of 
opportunities for a variety of U.S. businesses. 

Second, by Western standards, the Russian labor force is generally considered to be well- 
educated and the defense industries have extremely well qualified, technical personnel. In 
addition, labor costs are relatively inexpensive for the level of education associated with 
work performed in high-tech defense sectors. 

Third, Russian defense enterprises have an overabundance of plant capacity. Excess plant 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 4-10 



capacity resulting from severe cutbacks in defease orders has left many plants 
underutilized, providing a commercially attractive aspect to an otherwise negative 
infrastructure outlook. Defense plants also tend to have some of the most sophisticated 
manufacturing equipment available in Russia. 

2. Areas of Qualitative Russian Advantage 1 

In 1990, the Department of Defense and the Department of Commerce co-chaired an 
Interagency Technology Assessment Group (ITAG) to develop a list of technologies where 
it was then estimated that the former Soviet Union led Western accomplishments. The 
technologies were measured in scientific (mathematical or physical) terms, or in business 
terms (cheaper to manufacture, less labor-intensive, etc.), or both. 

To emphasize that there are wide-ranging opportunities for those who persist in working 
through the obstacles discussed above, listed below are the technologies identified in the 
ITAG report, Soviet Commercial Technolog ies. 



Chemical/Allied Products (SIC 28) 

o Aluminum Oxide Production Processes 

o Lasant Materials (Lasers) 

o Polyurethane Compounds 

o Self-Propagating High-Temperature Synthesis 

o Synthetic Rubber Production Processes 

o Turbulent Reactor 

Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastics Products (SIC 30) 

o Carbon Adhesives 

o Carbon-Carbon Products 

o Componers 

o Rolivsans Thermosetting Cast Resins 

Primary Metals Industries (SIC 33) 

o Dynamic Compaction Synthesis 

o Elastomeric Roll Forming of Sheet Metal 

o Filament Winding of Thick Section Composites Fabrication Processes 

o Impulse Processing Method 

o Plasma-Mechanical Metal Processing 



i 



Derived from Soviet Commercial Technolog ies. Interagency Technology Assessment Group. I S 
Department of Commerce, Office of Foreign Availability, September [990. This document is available 
through the National Technical Information Service, (703) 487-4650. Ask for Document Number PB- 
ADA-227672. 

U.S. Department of Commerce July l 1 ^^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 4-1 1 



o Vacuum Processing of Steel with Synthetic Slag and Inert Gases 
o Weldable Aluminum-Lithium Alloys 

Fabricated Metal Products (SIC 34) 

o Rotary-Planetary Mill Machining 
o Small Nuclear Power Reactors 

Industrial/Commercial Machinery and Computer Equipment (SIC 35) 

o Diesel Engines 

o Fiber Optics Module for Automatic Control Systems 

o Multiple-Reflection Optical Systems 

o Waveguide Holograms 

Electronic and Other Electrical Equipment/Components (SIC 36) 

o Disk Explosive Magnetic Generators 

o Explosive Magnetohydrodynamic Generators 

o High Brightness Negative Ion Source 

o High Power Gas Lasers 

o High Power RF Heaters for Ionospheric Modification 

o High Power RF tubes 

o Laser Instrumentation 

o Magnetic Flux Compression Generators 

o Microgravity-Processed Ultra-Pure Semiconductor Single Crystals 

o Pulsed Power 

o Pulsed Wave De-icing/ Anti-Icing Equipment 

o Spatial Light Modulators 

o Tacitrons 

o Vacuum Microelectronics 

Transportation Equipment (SIC 37) 

o Cryogenic Fuel Aircraft Engines 

o Fan-Prop Aircraft Engines 

o Gas Turbine Helicopter Engines 

o Wing with Internal Framework (Lattice Control Surface or Grid Fin) 

Measuring. Analyzing, and Controlling Instruments: Photographic. Medical. Optical 
(SIC 38) 

o Biochrome Films 

o Diamond-Coated Surgical Instruments 

o Homosorption Filter Technology 

o Jet Injection Equipment for Immunizations 

o Lidar Remote Sensing 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 4-12 



o Microstructure Laser Devices 

o Performance Enhancement Electrical Devices 

o Physiological Measurement Devices 

o Pseudorandom Noise-Coded Waveform Processing 

o Residual Stress Engineering Measurement Devices 

o Vaccine Inhalator Devices 

Transportation Services (SIC 47) 

o Space Launch Services 

o Commercial Experimental Payload Services 

En gineering. Accounting. Research, Management and Related Services (SIC 87) 

o Magneto hydrodynamic-Accelerated Simulation 

3 . Encouraging Perspectives 

Eugene K. Lawson, President, U.S. -Russia Business Council, and former Vice Chairman. 
Eximbank, offered the following perspective as encouragement to U.S. firms to get 
involved in business in Russia while participating in OPIC's March 1993 Conference on 
Investment Opportunities in Russia: 

a. Largest untapped market in world resources - Russia represents the world's 
largest untapped market for natural resources (e.g. , timber, minerals and energy), 
production resources, (e.g., transportation), investment opportunities, and a highly 
educated, talented work force. 

b. Natural trading partners - Russia and the U.S. , effectively bordering on two 
oceans, have resources and industrial capacity the other can use, and enterprising 
people who can make this happen. 

c. We like each other - There is a mutual and enduring respect and admiration 
between the people of both countries. 

d. Cold, not hot, war - Remember, our two countries have never fought against 
each other; it was a cold, not hot, war they engaged in for much of the previous 
45 years. 

e. Pent-up consumer demand - The needs and preferences of individuals and 
families in Russia have only recendy begun to acquire greater emphasis and 
priority. This is similar to, but far greater in scope than, die consumer-driven 
actions and priorities in the U.S. in the late 1940s. 

f. Room for growth in international trade - The number ol "joint ventures between 
U.S. and Russian entities increased from about 40 in 1989 to approximate!) 872 
by 1993, and dtere is room for much more growth. 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv l 1 ** 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 4-13 



g. U.S. is #1 investor in the new Russia - The U.S. is the number one investor in 

the new Russia, measured in numbers of joint ventures and actual monetary units. 
(See charts on following pages.) 

h. No reason why U.S. cannot emerge as Russia's largest trading partner - The 

foregoing suggests that there is no reason why the U.S. cannot eventually become 
Russia's largest trading partner. 

i. Get outside of Moscow - Look at the spontaneous growth of capitalism and 

privatization at the regional and local level throughout Russia. 

j. U.S. financial institutions have room for growth of credit in Russia - European 

financial institutions have already extended their available credit, but U.S. 
financial institutions continue to have credit available for business in Russia. 

4. Direct Investment Activity in Russia 

Estimates of the amount of foreign investment in Russia vary widely. According to 
Goskomstat, Russia accumulated foreign investment of about USD 4 billion by the end of 
1994, representing 16,036 firms with foreign participation. 

Goskomstat puts a foreign direct investment in 1994 at USD 1 billion. Portfolio investments 
estimated at USD 200 million. About 50 percent of 1994 foreign investment was in the 
country's fuel industry. 

COUNTRY DATA 1 

Profile 

Population: 148,365,800 people (January 1995) 

(Source: Russian State Committee on Statistics) 
Population Growth Rate: percent 

(Source: Embassy Estimate) 
Religions: Russian Orthodox, Islamic, Jewish, Catholic, Protestant, Buddhist, other. 
Government System: Federal with 88 republics, provinces, and regions with varying degrees of autonomy. 
Languages: Russian (official), over 140 other languages and dialects. 
Work Week: 40 hours per week. 



Trade (Billions of USD) 1994 1995 

Total Country Exports 43.900 47.100 

Total Country Imports 6 33.100 34.500 

U.S. Exports to Russia 7 2.579 2.837 

U.S. Imports from Russia 7 3.235 5.000 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 4-14 



Domestic Economy (Figures in U.S. Millions $ unless noted) 





1994 


1995 


1996 3 


GDP (Trillion nominal rubles) 


630 


1,450 




GDP Growth Rate 


-15% 


-9% 




GDP Per Capital (thousand rubles) 


4,256 


9,797 




Government Spending as Percent of 
GDP 


37% 


33% 




Inflation 


878% 


303% 




Unemployment 


7.1 


7.9 




Foreign Exchange Rate (USD billion) 


4.0 


2.6 




Average Exchange Rate 


2,205 


3,550 




Foreign Debt (USD billion) 


80 


130 




Debt Service Ratio (before rescheduling) 


27.4 


24.4 




U.S. Economic/Threat Reduction 
Assistance 


1,611 


343 





Source: Russian State Statistics Committee (GOSKOMSTAT) 

2 The rapid depreciation of the ruble in 1994 and early 1995 makes it meaningless to delineate this data in 

dollar terms. 
3 Figures for 1996 cannot be predicted with any degree of reliability. 1995 figures are U.S. Embassy or 

officials estimates. 
4 Millions of U.S. dollars. In addition, 1.2 billion U.S. dollars were appropriated for fiscal years '92-*94 in 

Threat reduction assistance. 
Excluding CIS countries. 
6 Includes an estimate of shuttle or informal trade. 



7 Source: U.S. Department of Commerce. 



4. Foreign Investment Statistics 

According to Goskomstat, estimates of foreign investment in Russia vary widely. 
Russia accumulated foreign investment of USD 4 billion by the end of 19Q4. 
representing some 16,036 firms with foreign participation. Goskomstat puts foreign 
direct investment in 1994 at USD 1 billion. 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Julv I** 



4-15 



Statics from the Russian government indicate that the following countries are leading 
investors in Russia: 



Country 


Percent Total 


Rubles (in Millions) 


Firms 


U.S 


24.1 


30,967 


872 


Hong Kong 


6.9 


8,810 


66 


Switzerland 


5.8 


7,465 


195 


Canada 


4.0 


5,090 


126 


U.K. 


3.3 


4,208 


367 


Spain 


3.2 


4,152 


72 


Turkey 


3.2 


4,133 


75 


Belgium 


2.8 


3,547 


76 


PRC 


2.5 


3,166 


311 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



4-16 



July 1996 



CHAPTER 5 - U.S. AND RUSSIAN EXPORT CONTROLS 

A. U.S. EXPORT CONTROLS 

The United States had a generally strict export control policy toward the Soviet Union. With the 
dissolution of that state, the United States is now liberalizing its controls toward Russia and the 
other emerging democracies among the countries of the former Soviet Union. The United States 
has a multi-agency export control organization devoted to the task. 

1 . Dual-Use Export Controls 

The Department of Commerce administers export controls for items that can be used both 
for military and civilian dual-use purposes. Recent changes in the Department of 
Commerce export control regulations have significantly increased the potential for high 
technology trade with Russia. The Commerce Department's Section 799. 1 of the Export 
Administration Regulations (EAR) contains the list of controlled commodities and 
technical data. 

On September 1, 1991, a new Commerce Control List (CCL) went into effect. The CCL 
greatly reduced the number of items controlled for reasons of national security, 
provided more specific descriptions of the items controlled, aligned control parameters 
with current industry standards, decontrolled items which are readily available "off-the- 
shelf in everyday commerce, and improved harmonization with the tariff system 
implemented by the U.S. Customs Service. In addition, U.S. export control policy has 
changed from a presumption of denial to a presumption of approval for an export to 
Russia as long as the export is destined for civilian end-uses or purposes, the end-use is 
not military or for defense purposes, or the end-user is not a military organization. 

The United States and its partners in the now-defunct COCOM agree that the maintenance 
of some export controls on Russia remain strategically necessary. The more sophisticated 
the technology, the more likely it will require an export license. U.S. industry is advised 
that one-on-one visits, conversations, and training may involve exports of technical data if 
they include discussions concerning controlled commodities, and could require an export 
license. The visit, conversations, or training representing the export may be in the United 
States or Russia. U.S. companies should therefore consult the Bureau of Export 
Administration (BXA) before engaging in consultations and/or business transactions 
involving the export of controlled dual-use commodities and technical data. 



U.S. Department of Commerce Juh 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

5-1 



A. Assistance 

All goods and technology on the CCL require an export license. If a firm, 
enterprise, or exporter is unsure of the type of export license required, the Export 
Administration Regulations (15 CFR §730 - 799) should be consulted, or a call 
placed to the Exporter Counselling staff at (202) 482-481 1 or fax your request to 
(202) 482-3617 and request Form BXA-748P which could be used either to obtain 
an export license or a commodity classification. To determine how a particular 
commodity or technical data is classified, follow the procedure listed below to 
obtain a commodity classification. 

B. How to Obtain a Commodity Classification: 

1 . From the Manufacturer : The manufacturer should be able to provide the 
proper commodity classification (Export Control Commodity Number[s]). 

2. Company Engineer : A company engineer who has technical expertise and 
knows the product well can review Section 799. 1 of the Export 
Administration Regulations (CFR 1 5) against a product's technical 
parameters and try to categorize/classify the commodity. 

3 . Official Request to Operations Support Branch : Submit an official request 
to Operations Support Branch on Form BXA-748P. Follow the 
procedures below. 

a. Submit the following information: 

i. Complete Form BXA-748P and send a cover letter including 

a technical analysis, 
ii. Product brochures with detailed technical specifications, 

iii. List specific commodities of concern (5 or less per request), 
iv. Include model numbers if applicable. 

b. Include the following information in your cover letter. 

i. A recommended classification for the commodities. 

ii. The reasons for the recommendations, including a technical 

analysis of the commodities in terms of the technical 
parameters specified in the regulations, and 

iii. The reasons for providing a classification, if one does not 

U.S. Department of Commerce My 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

5-2 



provide a technical analysis, including, as appropriate, 
any/all ambiguities or deficiencies in the regulations that 
preclude making a technically accurate analysis or 
classification. 

c. Once Operations Support Branch (OSB) has classified the 

commodity, the individual will receive in reply an official letter 
containing the classification. BXA provides commodity 
classifications only in writing. BXA does not consider any verbal 
advice received from the Exporter Counselling Division, OSB, or 
any other unit of BXA to be a formal agency determination or 
binding. 

4. Send the completed Form BXA-748P and other information to the following 
address: 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
Operations Support Branch 
P.O. Box 273 
Washington, D.C. 20044 

Status: (202) 482-4905 
Fax: (202)482-9179 

C. To check on the status of a license application or commodity classification call or 
fax your request to the Exporter Counselling Division at: 

Phone: (202)482-4811 
Fax: (202)482-3617 

STELA (automated answering system 24 hour) phone: (202) 482- 2752 



2. Defense Export Controls 

The United States controls the export of all defense items and the Department of State is 
responsible for these export controls. The State Department's International Traffic in 
Arms Regulations (ITAR) contains a list of defense articles which the Department of State 
controls. 

Although it is the policy of the United States to deny exports of defense articles to 
proscribed destinations, including Russia, the Department of State anticipates that l S 

U.S. Department of Commerce July N»*> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

5-3 



industry will receive requests for defense equipment or services. Prior to engaging in any 
consultations or transactions involving the export of defense articles, including technical 
data and technical assistance, companies should consult with the Department of State, 
Center for Defense Trade, Office of Defense Trade Controls or Office of Defense Trade 
Policy. They may be reached as follows: 

PM/DTC, SA-6, Room 200 
Office of Defense Trade Controls (DTC) 
Bureau of Politico-Military Affairs 
U.S. Department of State 
Washington, D.C. 20522-0602 

Phone: 703-875-6644 

Fax: 703-875-6647 

PM/DTP, Room 7815 
Office of Defense Trade Policy 
Bureau of Politico-Military Affairs 
U.S. Department of State 
Washington, D.C. 20520-7815 

Phone: 202-647-4231 

Fax: 202-647-4232 



B. RUSSIAN EXPORT CONTROL POLICIES AND PRACTICES 

1 . Background 

The June 1992 Charter for American-Russian Partnership and Friendship announced that 
"the United States and Russia agree that the process of normalization of technology trade 
is based on Russian determination to adhere strictly to world standards of export controls 
in the area of the nonproliferation of weapons of mass destruction and related 
technologies, missiles and missile technology, destabilizing conventional armaments, and 
dual-use goods and technologies." 

Since then, Russia and the other nations of the Former Soviet Union have regularly voiced 
their commitment to deny weapons of mass destruction, chemical and biological weapons, 
and launch vehicles to countries of concern. In a state of the nation address in February, 
for example, Russian President Yeltsin proclaimed, "We are coming out unequivocally in 
favor of strengthening the regime of non-proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and 
the latest military technologies." 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

5-4 



2. Russian Export Controls 

According to Russian export control officials, the Russian Federation export control 
system has the following objectives: 

1) protection of Russian state economic interests; 

2) control of the export of raw materials that are used in developing missiles 
and weapons of mass destruction; and 

3) control of items which are used in developing weapons of mass destruction, 
thereby preventing their proliferation, and meeting Russian international 
obligations. 

President Yeltsin has issued a series of decrees since 1992 that provide the legal basis for 
developing export controls in Russia. The decrees established an interagency Russian 
Export Control Commission (ECC) that ensures a unified policy on the export of special 
weapons and related technologies. The ECC makes decisions on controversial 
applications for most types of sensitive exports, including nuclear dual-use items and 
missile, chemical, and biological weapons-related items. 

Besides creating the Export Control Commission, President Yeltsin also established in 
1992 the Interagency Commission on Military-Technical Cooperation to review 
applications for conventional weapons exports. Both commissions include representatives 
of the Russian Ministries of Foreign Affairs, Foreign Economic Relations, Economics, and 
Defense. 

Government decrees also establish lists of items subject to control. 

One list corresponds to what was COCOM's Industrial List and includes items such as 
strategic raw materials and dual-use products. Other lists cover nuclear-, missile-, 
chemical-, and biological-related materials and are typically based on international lists 
such as those of the Missile technology Control regime and the Nuclear Suppliers Group. 
Although the Russia is not a member of the MTCR, it adheres to it and considers its rules 
to be more strict than those called for by the MTCR. 

The Russians indicate they followed the recommendations of the Australia Group for its 
lists of both chemical- and biological-related items, although there are some discrepancies 

The Russian Government requires exporters seeking to ship controlled commodities to 
submit applications for an export license to the Ministry of Foreign Economic Relations 
(MFER). MFER forwards complicated cases to the Export Control Commission. If the 
Commission approves the export, then the Ministry' issues the license. For Don-industrial, 
non-dual use commodities, (e.g., military or nuclear items), the Russian Ministry 

U.S. Department of Commerce July W% 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg- 

5-5 



overseeing the industry sector that produces the commodity (e.g., the Ministry of Defense 
or the Ministry of Atomic Energy) has to give written pre-clearance of the export before 
the MFER can grant the license or International Import Certificate. 

MFER bases a positive decision on the availability of the item and the importer's 
agreement not to use the item, directly or indirectly, for purposes banned by the 
international regimes. The Russian government also prohibits the foreign importer from 
reexporting the item without written authorization of the Russian exporter. The recipient 
country is required to document these safeguards. The Russians also consider whether the 
importing country is a member of multilateral organizations in the area of nonproliferation; 
whether the importing country was ever denied the transfer of regulated technologies; 
whether the importing country ever used legal imports for purposes inconsistent with the 
obligations the Russians follow, etc. 

The Russians are improving their criminal penalties. The legislature, early in 1993, added 
a law which provides for three to eight years imprisonment for the illegal export of items 
from the controlled lists. Additionally, the Ministry of Justice has been directed to prepare 
proposals to institutionalize legal and administrative liability for unlawful exports. 
Notwithstanding some evident progress, Russia has more work to do—particularly in the 
enforcement area—to have an effective export control system. Although Russian customs 
officials routinely intercept contraband shipments of strategic metals and petroleum, 
regulated materials, including small arms and radioactive materials, are making their way 
out without proper licensing. 

The U.S. government plans to assist Russia in further developing its export control system. 
Firms on the front lines of defense conversion will be prime candidates for the earliest 
efforts of industry outreach for export controls. 

In the meantime, inadequate funding has constrained hiring of border guards and limited 
the training programs that would better qualify them to identify sensitive materials and 
administer export controls. Resource problems also limit Russia's ability to educate 
Russian industries on new export control regulations, although Russia has advertised new 
export control regulations in the press. Corruption has also complicated efforts to control 
weapons and technology transfers. Russian export controls continue to suffer from a 
poorly defined legal system providing a basis for control. Decrees— not Russian law~ 
largely provide the current basis of Russia's export controls. 

Non-Government Source of Information 

The ANSER Center for International Aerospace Cooperation (CIAC), a private non-profit 
research institute with offices in Arlington, VA, and Moscow keeps abreast of the recent 
degrees issued in the regions covered. A recent degree #879 of the Russian Federation of 
Ministers "On Improvement of the Export and Import Control System for Defense-Related 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

5-6 



or 



Products, Activities, and Services in the Russian Federation" is contained in ANSER's 
CIAC Moscow Report # 155. For this and other reports contact: 

Stephen Hopkins, Deputy Director 
ANSER Center for International Cooperation, 
1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 800, 
Arlington, VA 22202 
Tel: (703)416-8430 
Fax:(703)416-8440 
Internet: ANSERCIAC@ANSER.ORG 

Debra Facktor 

Moscow Office Chief, Anser CIAC 

54 2nd Tverskaya-Yamskaya Ulitsa, Suite 171 

125047 Moscow, Russia 

Phone: (01 1-7-095) 251-5295 

Fax: (011-7-095)250-3783 

E-mail: 76110.342@compuserve.com 



C. RUSSIAN MULTILATERAL CONTROL INITIATIVES 

In June 1992, the COCOM member nations established a Cooperation Forum (CCF) and 
invited Russia and the other reforming nations in the former Soviet Union to participate. 
The CCF was intended to provide a forum to discuss international standards for export 
controls as well as a mechanism to coordinate technical assistance efforts. 

Russian delegates to the inaugural meeting of the CCF in November 1992 in Paris 
enthusiastically endorsed COCOM's plans to liberalize trade with former Soviet bloc 
countries as they establish the export controls necessary to prevent unauthorized transfers 
of sensitive technologies. Russia is a depositary of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation 
Treaty, and a member of the Nuclear Suppliers Group. It has also signed the Chemical 
Weapons Convention that bans the transfer of chemicals with military applications. 
Russian officials claim it controls over missile-related transfers are based on the Missile 
Technology Control Regime, and the U.S. Government has classified Russia as an MTCR 
"adherent." 



U.S. Department of Commerce July l 00 o 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg . 

5-7 



CHAPTER 6 - RECENT BILATERAL AGREEMENTS 

REFORM: POLITICAL AND ECONOMIC ASPECTS 

As Russia embarks on its historic course of economic reform, one of the questions concerning 
U.S. businesses contemplating investment in the emerging Russian market is whether the 
reform process will continue and result in a commercial environment conducive to "normal" 
business activity, or whether it will collapse, leaving the state-controlled command system 
stagnating. 

Initial efforts toward economic reform, however, have entailed significant hardships, and 
provoked increasing opposition. Prices have soared, industrial production has fallen, and many 
enterprises are on the verge of bankruptcy. 

Nevertheless, on August 19, 1992, President Yeltsin announced an ambitious privatization 
plan. The government's economic plan provides for the complete privatization of small 
industrial enterprises and most of the housing stock by 1994. According to former Premier 
Gaydar, between 50 and 60 percent of state-owned industry in Russia is slated for privatization 
by the end of 1995. The long-awaited announcement was clearly designed to give new 
momentum to Russia's flagging economic reform program and dispel a growing sense of 
pessimism among ordinary Russians. 

During the June 1992 Summit meeting, Presidents Bush and Yeltsin authorized a number of 
agreements aimed at alleviating and eliminating obstacles to U.S. trade and investment in 
Russia. These agreements help to create a positive climate for business opportunities. These 
agreements included the Joint Russian-American Declaration on Defense Conversion Other 
agreements established The Charter for American-Russian Partnership and Friendship, a 
bilateral investment treaty, a treaty for avoidance of double taxation of income, a trade 
agreement, and an OPIC investment incentive agreement. These agreements and initiatives, 
which serve to foster a commercial environment in Russia conducive to U.S. trade and 
investment, are described below. 

1 . Joint Russian-American Declaration on Defense Conversion 

In this declaration, the United States of America and the Russian Federation state their 
intention to make cooperation in advancing defense conversion a high priority Both 
countries recognize that defense conversion is key to building a more economically 
viable world and assuring world peace. Although both countries are aware of the 
difficulties involved, they also realize that the successful conversion of resources no 
longer needed for defense was in the long-term economic and national security interests 
of both nations. 



U.S. Department of Commerce Julv !*>*> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

6-1 



The United States of America and the Russian Federation also agreed to establish a 
U.S. -Russian Committee on Defense Conversion to facilitate conversion through 
expanded trade and investment. This committee is to: 

— facilitate the exchange of information particularly on conversion enterprises; 
~ promote trade and investment; 

— encourage contacts between interested parties; 

— improve commercial conditions in both countries through the identification and 
removal of obstacles to trade and investment. 

With the aim of promoting successful cooperation in conversion, each country 
committed to a number of practical steps in the near future. 

The Russian Federation will: 

~ establish on its territory a favorable political, economic, legal, and regulatory 
climate for American trade and investment; 

~ institute the necessary reforms to make the ruble convertible; 

— institute the necessary reforms to support the privatization and de-monopolization 
of industry; 

— enact laws guaranteeing contract and property rights; and, 

— disseminate basic business and financial information on enterprises undergoing 
conversion. 

The United States Government will: 

— place defense conversion resident advisers in Russia; 

— provide expertise to local leaders and enterprise directors; 



-- establish in Russia business centers with translation, education, and training 
facilities for U.S. businesses operating in Russia; 

~ create a business information service ("BISNIS") in Washington to match 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

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businesses in Russia with potential investors in the United States, and, 

— assure that the Trade and Development Program, the Overseas Private Investment 
Corporation, and the Eximbank provide incentives to American private 
investment in commercially viable defense conversion projects. 

The United States of America and the Russian Federation agree to: 

— remove barriers to high technology trade, 

— assist in the establishment of COCOM-comparable export control regimes in 
Russia, 

~ establish procedures to ensure the civil end-use of sensitive goods and 
technologies, and 

~ expand bilateral defense and military contacts. 

2. Charter for American-Russian Partnership and Friendship 

This Charter, signed on June 17, 1992, is meant to provide a solid and enduring basis for 
American-Russian partnership, and describes the new agenda for U.S. -Russian relations 
in the areas of democracy and partnership, international peace and security, and 
economic freedom. In this last area, the parties agree on the following: 

— The surest path to Russia's long-term prosperity and integration into the global 
economy is the continuation of the present path of free market reform. 

— The U.S is determined to continue its support for reform. 

— Russia will speed up privatization and de-monopolization, the introduction of 
structural and sectoral reform, and the creation of policies directed at furthering 
competition and effective property and contract rights. Of special importance will 
be the introduction of land reform and reforms in the energy sector 

— The Russian Federation will improve its laws in the fields of taxation, property, 
and contract law, and those relating to intellectual property rights 

— The parties recognize the critical role of the private sector and will encourage 
mutually beneficial Russian- American cooperation in trade and investment 

— The parties intend to lower constraints to trade and investment and to remo\ e 

U.S. Department of Commerce Jul\ '.*>*> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

6-3 



Cold War-era restrictions on business. The parties will also work to strengthen 
national export control systems and prevent proliferation. 

3 . Bilateral Investment Treaty 

The United States and the Russian Federation signed a bilateral investment treaty (BIT) 
on June 17, 1992. This treaty creates the legal framework designed to stimulate private 
investment. The Treaty demonstrates the determination of the Russian government to 
establish a market-oriented, open investment climate. Together with other agreements, 
the BIT should encourage U.S. business investment in Russia and facilitate our private 
sector's involvement in Russia's economic reform. On August 1 1, 1993, the U.S. Senate 
ratified this treaty. Specifically, the BIT: 

~ guarantees non-discriminatory treatment for U.S. investments in Russia and their 
operations there (i.e. assure "competitive equality"); 

~ guarantees the right to repatriate into hard currency, profits earned in rubles; 

— guarantees prompt, adequate and effective compensation in the event of an 
expropriation; and 

~ provides the right to third party international arbitration in the event of a dispute 
between a U.S. investor and the Russian government. 

The BIT still awaits ratification by the Russian Parliament. 

4. Treaty for the Avoidance of Double Taxation of Income 

This treaty, also signed on June 17, 1992, will help to promote a strong expansion of 
economic, technical and cultural ties between the two countries, and replaces the 
Convention on Matters of Taxation which the United States and the USSR signed in 
1973. The new treaty, which went into effect on January 1, 1994, provides certainty to 
potential investors concerning their tax treatment on income earned from sources in the 
other country, and will in many cases eliminate or reduce the tax liability at source so as 
to encourage greater investment flows. Among other things, the treaty will provide: 

— relief from double taxation, i.e., only income earned in Russia is taxable in Russia; 

— assurance of nondiscriminatory tax treatment; 

~ for cooperation between the U.S. and Russian tax officials to resolve potential 
problems of double taxation; and 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

6-4 



for exchange of tax information between tax authorities to help improve 
compliance with respective income tax laws and the provisions of the treaty 



5. U.S. Russian Trade Agreement 

This agreement provides for reciprocal Most Favored Nation (MFN) tariff treatment to 
the products of each country. The Trade Agreement was originally concluded with the 
Soviet Union in June 1990 and approved by the U.S. Congress in November 1991 . The 
U.S. and Russia agreed on technical adjustments to that agreement to reflect the 
establishment of an independent Russia. U.S. Congressional re-approval is not required. 

In addition to providing MFN for both parties, the Agreement: 

~ provides improved market access and non-discriminatory treatment for U.S. 
goods and services in Russia and also calls for step-by-step provision of national 
treatment for U.S. products and services; 

-- facilitates business by allowing free operation of commercial representations in 
each country and by permitting companies to engage and serve as 
distributors/agents and consultants and to conduct market studies; and 

— offers strong intellectual property rights protection. 

6. OPIC Investment Incentive Agreement 

On June 17, 1992, the Russian Federation informed the U.S. Government that it has 
fulfilled all the legal requirements for entry into force of the bilateral OPIC Investment 
Incentive Agreement signed in Washington on April 3, 1992. As the United States had 
already completed all its legal requirements, the Agreement entered into force on June 
17. This Agreement will allow the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) to 
make its investment insurance, finance and promotion programs available to U.S. 
businesses considering investing in Russia. According to OPIC officials U.S. businesses 
have submitted approximately 300 investment proposals for a variety of business 
ventures; approximately one to two dozen specifically relate to defense conversion 
projects. 

The Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) is a U.S. Government agency that 
promotes economic growth in developing countries by encouraging U.S. private 
investment in those nations. OPIC assists American investors through three principal 
agreements: (1) financing investment projects through direct loans and loan guaranties, 
(2) insuring investment projects against a broad range of political risks, and (3) providing 

U.S. Department of Commerce ,'ul\ l 1 *** 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

6-5 



a variety of investor services, including advisory services, investment missions, 
computer-assisted project/investor matching, and country information kits. OPIC 
encourages U.S. private investment in sound business projects, thereby improving U.S. 
global competitiveness, creating American jobs and increasing U.S. exports. 

With respect to OPIC activities in the Russian Federation and the Newly Independent 
States (NIS), OPIC has two major initiatives available to the American business 
community. First, OPIC offers the NIS Private Sector Initiative which assists U.S. 
companies in locating and exploring private sector investment opportunities throughout 
the NIS. Second, to facilitate investment in the pharmaceutical and medical equipment 
and supplies manufacturing industries, OPIC has also implemented the NIS Health 
Sector Initiative. Through both of these programs, OPIC will organize and execute 
investment missions to selected NIS countries and OPIC will also coordinate conferences 
and seminars in the U.S. 



7. Eximbank Activity 

In response to President Bush's initiative, the Congress repealed legislative restraints on 
Eximbank activity in Russia on April 1, 1992, by repealing the Stevenson and Byrd 
amendments that had a $300 million Eximbank financing ceiling and constraints on 
financing of oil and gas transactions. Through August 1 994, Eximbank has approved 
roughly $1.5 billion worth of financing for exports to Russia. 

In July 1993, Eximbank signed an Oil and Gas framework agreement under which 
Eximbank may provide financing assistance of up to $2 billion for purchases of 
equipment and services to revitalize Russia's energy sector. Eximbank has supported 
over a billion dollars' worth of U.S. exports under this agreement to date. Eximbank's 
Russian partners are the Russian Central Bank and Ministry of Fuel and Energy. 
Individual transactions under the framework agreement will be considered on a case-by- 
case basis. Repayment terms will be for five years (or possibly longer if appropriate), 
and the minimum amount of financing for each transaction will be $25 million. A recent 
loan by provided funds for the development of the IL-96 civilian airliner. Eximbank is 
prepared to enter into similar arrangements to assist other export sectors such as 
minerals and timber. 

In addition, Eximbank will consider loan and guarantee applications for limited recourse 
project financing in any sector of the Russian economy where the project will generate 
hard currency revenues and Eximbank's exposure will be significant—generally at least 
$50 million. Eximbank is also prepared to support, under its short- and medium-term 
insurance, loan, and guarantee programs, transactions involving U.S. exports to the 
Russian Federation where the only available security would be a sovereign obligation or 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

6-6 



guarantee. In such cases, the obligor or guarantor will be the Bank for Foreign Trade of 
the Russian Federation (VTB), and the other with the Bank for Foreign Economic 
Affairs of the Russian Federation (VEB), acting on behalf of the Russian Federation 
Credit guarantee facilities, providing an Eximbank guarantee in medium-term lines of 
credit from commercial banks, are available to Russian private commercial banks with 
acceptable levels of capital that can provide satisfactory audited financial statements 



U.S. Department of Commerce July I 1 ** 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

6-7 



THE WHITE HOUSE 
Office of the Vice President 



For Immediate Release January 30, 1996 

U.S.-Russian Joint Commission 
On Economic and Technical Cooperation 

THE GORE-CHERNOMYRDIN COMMISSION 

Defense Conversion Committee 

Vice President Al Gore applauds continuing progress in the U.S.-Russian Defense 
Conversion Committee's joint efforts to facilitate and support the conversion of Russian 
defense industries formerly involved in weapons of mass destruction to peaceful commercial 
endeavors. The "Fast Four" Nunn-Lugar defense conversion projects had employed 330 
former Russian defense industry employees and converted 27,600 square meters of factory 
space in Russia from military to civilian production as of January 1996. The Defense 
Enterprise Fund ~ the private, non-profit venture capital fund established by Congress and 
funded by the Department of Defense to assist in defense conversion in Russia, Ukraine, 
Kazakstan and Belarus — signed a finance protocol for a new potential joint venture in 
Russia. The DEF, Ernst & Young of Chicago and Mashinostroyenia of Moscow will form a 
joint venture to provide world class computer systems development and contract 
programming services to the world market Mashinostroyenia formerly designed and built 
ICBMs, nuclear-armed cruise missiles and reconnaissance satellites. The Defense Enterprise 
Fund expects to invest between $l-$3 million in this joint venture, in addition to the $9.6 
million already invested by the DEF to help convert defense facilities in Russia that had 
produced weapons of mass destruction to civilian production. 

The Department of Commerce welcomed the first group of 20 Russian participants in 
its SABIT (Special American Business Internship Training ) Defense Conversion Program. 
They completed their training from October to December 1995. OPIC signed a Memorandum 
of Understanding with the Russian side of the Committee to work together to encourage and 
support U.S. investment in defense conversion projects. ACDA's follow-up to its June 1995 
Entrepreneurial Workshop resulted in business contacts and a potential relationship between 
Halliburton Energy Services of Texas and the Russian nuclear weapons design laboratory 
Arzamas- 16 to produce oil-well perforators. The U.S. Trade and Development Agency 
(TDA) provided $515,000 in funding for two additional feasibility studies of potential defense 
conversion joint ventures in Russia. For 1996, the Defense Conversion Committee is planning 
three conferences and workshops in Russia and the U.S. to promote defense conversion 
business partnerships and assist in the economic revitalization of Russian cities with a heavy 
concentration of defense industry. 

ii ii jj 
TttTTT 



CHAPTER 7 - ADDITIONAL SOURCES OF INFORMATION 

GOVERNMENT - U.S. 

Agency for International Development 
Center for Trade and Investment 

515 22nd St., N.W., Room 100 
Washington, DC 20523-0229 

Contact: Laura Hatton, David Rybak 
Phone: 1-800-872-4348 
Local: (202) 663-2660 
Fax: (202) 663-2670 

Department of Commerce 

A BISNIS 

(Business Information Service for the Newly 
Independent States), Room 74 1 3 
14th and Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
Washington, DC 20230 

Contact: Anne Grey, Acting Director 

Phone: (202) 482-4655 

Fax: (202) 482-2293/Flashfax: (202) 482-3 145 

E-Mail: bisnis@usita.gov 

To visit BISNIS HomePage - http://www.iep.doc.gov/bisnis/bisnis.html 
Publications : BISNIS Bulletin; BISNIS Search for Partners; BISNIS Bank 
Flashfax, over 100 handouts on doing business in the newly 
independent states of the former Soviet Union. 

B. Bureau of Export Administration (BXA) 

1. Defense Conversion Subcommittee Working Group, Room 3S"o 
14th and Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. 
Washington, DC 20230 

Contact: William J. Denk 
Phone: (202) 482-3695 
Fax: (202) 482-5650 



U.S. Department of Commerce Jul) W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-1 



2. "The Russian Defense Business Directory" - Fourth Installment, 
special and future editions 

Contact: Daniel C. Hurley, Jr., Room 3892 

Phone: (202) 482-1455 

Fax (202) 482-2387 

E-Mail: dhurley@bxa.doc.gov, 

14th and Constitution Ave., N.W. 
Washington, DC 20230 

3. St. Petersburg and Leningrad Region Business Directory - Fifth 
Installment 

Contact: Franklin J. Carvalho, Room 1089, 

Phone: (202) 482-0672, 482-5953 

Fax: (202)482-3195, 

E-mail: fcarvalh@bxa.doc.gov 

14th and Constitution Aves., N.W. 
Washington, DC 20230 

C. International Trade Administration 

Office of Eastern Europe, Russia, & the Newly 
Independent States, Room 3413 
14th and Pennsylvania Ave., N.W. 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
Washington, DC 20230 

Contact: Susanne Lotarski, Director 
Phone: (202)482-1104 

Publication: Obstacles to Trade and Investment in the New Republics of 
the Former Soviet Union: A Review of Impediments as Seen by the U.S. 
Business Community, March 1992, Document number PB 92-161 173. To 
order call or write the National Technical Information Service (NTIS): 
5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161; phone: (703) 487-4650, 
fax: (703) 321-8547. 

D. International Trade Administration (ITA) 
Office of Export Trading Company Affairs 

Consortia of American Businesses in the Newly Independent States 

(CABNIS), Room 1800, HCHB 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-2 



14th and Constitution Ave., N.W. 
Washington, DC 20230 

Contact: W. Dawn Busby, Director 

Office of Export Trading Company Affairs 
Phone: (202) 482-5004 

Fax: (202) 482-4654 

The International Trade Administration (IT A) funds grants through 
CABNIS, a Commerce program designed to help U.S. firms do business in 
the new and complex markets of the NIS. Since its inception in 1992, the 
CABNIS program has approved nine three-year grants. Grant funding 
totaled $4.5 million in FY 1993, and funding for FY 1994 is $1.5 million 
CABNIS expects to approve a minimum of three more grants this year. 
Individual CABNIS awards will total up to $500,000, to be matched by the 
award recipient with non-Federal (cash and/or in-kind) resources. 

The CABNIS program has already generated more than $9 million in U.S. 
export transactions. 

Through CABNIS, nonprofit awardees form U.S. business consortia of 
for-profit firms, primarily small and medium sized firms, and establish 
trade offices in the NIS. Staffed by industry specialists, these commercial 
offices promote targeted industries and represent the business interests of 
U.S. companies. The consortia also undertake activities to enhance NIS 
private sector development, thus helping to create a business environment 
conducive to U.S. exports. 

CABNIS consortia provide hundreds of U.S. firms with a means to 
promote their products and services in a cost-effective manner. CABNIS 
helps U.S. firms position themselves to aggregate their commercial 
expertise and activities in order to enjoy some of the same advantages as 
larger export businesses. U.S. export transactions and business 
relationships occur quickly under CABNIS relative to individual companies 
trying to export on their own. 

Please note that all U.S. nonprofit organizations interested in promoting 
U.S. exports and developing NIS economies are likely candidates for the 
CABNIS program. Moreover, nothing precludes a group of U.S. firms or 
individuals from establishing a non profit umbrella organization and 
applying for funding assistance. Requests for Application Kits ("410- 
3172) should be addressed to OETCA, Room 1800 HCHB, U S 
Department of Commerce, 14th Street and Constitution Ave . N \Y . 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W^> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-3 



Washington, DC 20230. 

E. Special American Business Internship Training Program (SABIT) 

14th and Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Room 3413 
Washington, DC 20230 

Contact: Liesel Duhon, Director 
Phone: (202) 482-0073 
Fax: (202) 482-2443 

The International Trade Administration (IT A) coordinates SABIT, a program in 
which qualified U.S. firms host senior-level business executives and scientists 

from the Newly Independent States for three-to-six month internships. To date 
SABIT has placed approximately 600 interns in qualified firms throughout the 
United States. Call or fax the SABIT office to request an application brochure. 

The new "Defense Conversion SABIT" program will bring about 100 defense 
industry executives from Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus for 8 weeks of 
business training in the U.S. 

Contact: Monika Wasiewicz, Room 3878 

Phone: (202) 482-3984 

Fax: (202) 482-5650 

E-mail: Mwasiewi@bxa.doc.gov 

F. United States and Foreign Commercial Service 
Russia/NIS Program Office 

14th and Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Room 1235 
Washington, DC 20230 

Phone: (202)482-2902 
Fax: (202) 482-2456 

Moscow 

Location: Novinsky Bulvar, 1 5 
International Tel: (011-7-502) 224-1105 
International Fax: (01 1-7-502) 224-1 106 
Local Tel: (01 1-7-095) 255-4660 
or (011-7-095)255-4848 

Telex: 413 205 USCO SU 
Time: Plus 8 hours (E.S.T) 

U.S. Mailing Address: (Name of Employee) 

U. S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-4 



AMEMBASSY MOSCOW 
PSC 77 - FCS 

APOAE 09721 

Contacts: 

John Peters, Senior Commercial Officer 
Richard Steffens, Commercial Officer 
OPIC representative. 

St. Petersburg 

American Consulate General, Commercial Section 

57 Bolshaya Morskaya 

St. Petersburg, 190000 

International Tel: (011-7-812) 850-1902 

International Fax: (011-7-812) 850-1903 

Local Tel: (812) 110-6727 

Local Fax: (812) 110-6656 

Time: Plus 8 hours (E. ST.) 

U.S. Mailing Address: (Name of Employee) 
American Consulate General, 
St. Petersburg 
PSC 78, Box L 
APO AE 09723 

Contacts: 

David Schneider, Principal Commercial Officer 

Robert May, Commercial Officer 

Vladivostok 

American Consulate General Vladivostok 

Mordovtseva, 12 

Local Tel: (011-7-509)851-1011 

Local Fax: (01 1-7-4232) 268-445 

Time: Plus 15 hours (EST.) 

Foreign Commercial Officer: Tim Smith 

U.S. Mailing Address: 

(Name of Employee) 

AmConsul Vladivostok 

State Department 

Washington, DC 20521-5880 

Yekaterinburg 

U.S. Department of Commerce July W 1 ^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-5 



Dr. Howard J.T. Steers, Consul General 

Jonathan Turak, Political/Economic /Dep. Principal Officer 

Lev Koutchevski. Commercial Assistant 

Alexander Deianov, Commercial Assistant 

Ulitsa Gogolya 15A 

P.O. Box 400 

620 151 Yekaterinburg 

Tel: +7-3432-601-143 

+7-3432-564-619 

+7-3432-564-691 
Fax: +7-3432-601-801 

The United States Trade & Investment Center (USTIC) 

Ms. Beth Smits, Commercial Section 

U.S. Embassy 

27 Blvd. Du Regentlaan 1000 

Brussels 

Tel: 32-2/508-2534 

fax: 32-2/512-6653 

The U.S. Foreign Commercial Service and the U.S. Information Service working together 
with the American business community, are creating the USYIC to inform American 
companies in Europe about the emerging markets of Central and Eastern Europe, Russia 
and the Newly Independent States so that they can take advantage of the opportunities 
awaiting them in these important regions. Access to USTIC will be on the basis of 
memberships or subscriptions. 

American Business Centers™ (ABCs) 

American Business Centers provide the businessperson with a professional 
working environment and the services essential for doing business in the Newly 
Independent States of the former Soviet Union. 

ABC locations include: 

Russia 

Chelyabinsk 
Khabarovsk 
*Kiev. 

Nizhny Novgorod 
Nizhnevartovsk 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-6 



Novosibirsk 
*St. Petersburg 
""Vladivostok 

Volgograd 

Yekaterinburg 

Yuzhno- S akhalinsk 
*Almaty, Kazakhstan 
* Tashkent, Uzbekistan 

* These American Business Centers™ are under the management of the U.S. 
Department of Commerce's U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service. The U.S. and 
Foreign Commercial Service provides individualized counseling, agent/distributor 
location services, market research, trade promotion events, and advocacy services 

For an information packet on the American Business Centers™, contact the 
Business Information Service for the Newly Independent States at (202) 482-4655, 
ext. 21. 

American Business Center™ - Chelyabinsk, Russia 

In Russia: Christopher Elbring 
Phone: (011-7-3512)623-782 
Fax: (011-7-3512) 623-768 
E-mail : abc@ibm.urc.acru 

In U. S. : Shree L. Morris 
Phone: (803)785-2171 
E-mail: ibmabc@hargray.com 



American Business Center™ - Nizhnevartovsk, Russia 

In Russia: Allan Vodicka 
Phone/Fax: (0 1 1 -7-3466) 224-407 
E-mail: allan.abcent.vartovsk.tyumen.su 

In U.S.: Jen Kirk 

Phone: (847)870-8611 

Fax: (847)870-8331 

E-mail: 7464.302@compuserve.com 



American Business Center™ - Nizhny Novgorod, Russia 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W^> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-7 



In Russia: Nikolai Popov 
Novosibirsk, Russia 
Phone/Fax: (011-7-8312)372-213 
E-mail: abcnn@abc.nnov.su 
To reach Russia via Satellite 

Phone: (212)803-2026 
In U. S. : Aggie Bednarz 
Phone: (602)978-7400 
Fax: (602) 978-8238 
E-mail: abc@mhs.t-bird.edu 



American Business Center™ - Novosibirsk, Russia 

Russia Contact: Richard Love 
Hotel Sibir, 21 Leninskii 
Novosibirsk, Russia 
Phone: (01 1-7-3832) 22-13-76 
E-mail: NOVO@MCL.SAIC.COM 

U.S. Contact: ABC Program Office 
Science Applications Int'l Corp. 
1710 Goodridge Drive, M/S Tl-13-1 
McLean, VA 22 102 
Phone: (703)749-8978 
Fax: (703) 448-5746 
E-mail: ABC@SAIC.NSK.SU 

American Business Center™ - St. Petersburg, Russia 

Russia Contact: Janna Agasieva 

57 Bolshaya Morskaya 

St. Petersburg, Russia. 

Int'l. Phone: 011-7-812-850-1900 

Int'l. Fax: 011-7-812-850-1901 

Local Phone: 812-110-6042 

Local Fax: 812-311-0794 



American Business Center™ - Volgograd, Russia 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-8 



U.S. Contact: Margaretta Brede 

American Graduate School of Int'l Management 

15249 N. 59th Avenue 

Glendale, AZ 85306-6000 

Phone: (602)978-7400 

Fax: (602) 978-8238 

Natasha Kent 

C/o Volograd Union of Consumers Association, 

Lenin Street 9, Suite 30, 

Volgograd, Russia 400066 

Phone: (011-7-8442) 335-946 

Fax: (011-7-8442)362-732 

E-mail: ABCV @ ABC. TSARITSYN. SU 

American Business Center™ - Yekaterinburg, Russia 

Russia Contact: George Lambrou 

80 Lunacharsky Street 

620 219 Yekaterinburg, Russia 

Phone: (011-7-3432) 555-689 

Fax: (01 1-7-3432) 556-1 16 

E-mail: GEORGE. LAMBROU @ sovcust.sprint.com 

U.S. Contact: Bendy Viragh 

Pragma Corporation 

116E. Broad Street 

Falls Church, VA 22046 

Phone: (703)237-9303 

Fax: (703) 237-9326 

E-mail: pragma l@ix.netcom.com 

American Business Center- Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, Russia 

Russia Contact: Dinty Miller 
32 Kommunisticheskii Prospect 
Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk, Russia 
Tel/Fax: (01 1-7-42422) 23-142 
E-mail: abc@abc.sakhalin.su 



Congressional Research Service 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv WOc 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-9 



U.S. Library of Congress 
203 Madison Building 
Washington, DC 20540 

Contact: Dr. John P. Hardt 

Phone: (202) 707-8888 

Publication: A New Conversion Strategy: The Yeltsin-Gaidar Economic Crisis 



Department of Defense 

The Honorable William J. Perry 

Secretary of Defense 

Room 3E944 

The Pentagon 

Washington, DC 20301-1000 

Contacts: 

John Ruberto, Deputy Assistant to the Secretary of Defense 

Atomic Energy , Defense Conversion, Counter Poliferation Office, OATSD/(AE) 

Phone: (703)602-5671 

Fax: (703) 602-5744 

Susan Koch, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Threat Policy 
OSD/ISP/TRP, Room 5A670 
Phone: (703)697-0030 
Fax: (703)695-4461 

Laura Holgate, Director of Cooperative Threat Reduction, OSD/ISP/CTR, 
Jeff Moore, Special Assistant for Defense Conversion, Room 2D459 
Phone: (703) 614-8620 
Fax: (703) 693-1002 

Department of Energy 

Deputy Secretary of Energy 
Department of Energy, Room 7C-034 
1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. 
Washington, DC 20585 

Contact: DAS David Jhirad 
Phone: (202) 586-5493 
Fax: (202) 586-3047 

Department of Labor 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7- 1 



The Honorable Joquin Otero 
Deputy Under Secretary of Labor 
U.S. Department of Labor, Suite S-2235 
200 Constitution Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20210 

Contact: Ambassador John Ferch 
Phone: (202)219-7631 
Fax: (202) 219-5613 
Suite: S-5006 

Department of State 

The Honorable Strobe Talbott 
Ambassador at Large for NIS Affairs 

Thomas W. Simons, Jr. 

Coordinator for NIS Technical Assistance 

U.S. Department of State, Room 1004 

2201 C Street, N.W. 

Washington, DC 20520 

Contact: Mike Martin, Bill Taylor 

Phone: (202) 647-2414, (202) 647-2626 

Environmental Protection Agency 

Robert M. Sussman, Deputy Administrator 
401 M Street, S.W. 
RoomW1215 
Washington, DC 20460 

Contact: Dale Medearis 
Phone: (202)260-4571 

Export-Import Bank 

Room 1209 

811 Vermont Avenue, N.W. 

Washington, DC 20571 

Foreign Broadcast Information Service (FBIS) and Joint Publication Research 
Service (JPRS) publications contain political, military, economic, environmental, and 
sociological news, commentary and other information, as well as scientific and technical 
data reports. All information has been obtained from foreign radio and television 
broadcasts, new agency transmissions, newspapers, books and periodicals Items 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv l^-> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7- 1 1 



generally are processed from the first or best available sources. 

The FBIS Daily Report contains current news and information and is published Monday 
through Friday in eight volumes: China, East Europe, Soviet Union, East Asia, Near East 
& South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and West Europe. JPRS publications, 
which include approximately 50 regional, worldwide, and topical reports, generally 
contain less time-sensitive information and are published periodically. The public may 
subscribe to either hardcover or microfiche versions of the FBIS Daily Reports or JPRS 
reports through the National Technical Information Service (NTIS), 5285 Port Royal Rd, 
Springfield, VA 22161; Phone: (703) 487-4630, Fax: (703) 321-8547. 

Industrial College of the Armed Forces 

National Defense University, Fort McNair 
Washington, DC 20319-6000 

Contact: Dr. Clair K. Blong and James R. Lecky, Faculty Members 
Phone: (202) 475-9169 and (202) 475-1848 
Fax: (202) 475-9175 

In the spirit of the June 1992 Summit declaration, the National Defense University began a 
long-term effort to exchange information with the Russians on national and enterprise/firm 
conversion experiences and study Russian defense industrial conversion at the regional 
(oblast and city) and enterprise levels. 

The research focuses on the micro level, that is, the managers and decision-makers in the 
conversion process in four regions (Nizhniy Novgorod, Kaluga, Voronezh and Moscow 
Oblast science cities). Interviews help provide an understanding and appreciation how the 
managers perceive this process of economic adaptation and what they are doing to address 
its difficult challenges. The research addresses such issues as: how do the Russians define 
conversion, how are they managing the conversion process, what strategies are they 
employing at the enterprise level, how are local governments involved in the process, how 
is the labor force adapting or transitioning in this situation, and what is the status of the 
local economy? 

Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC) 

1 100 New York Avenue, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20527 

Contact: Loan Officer, Newly Independent States 

Phone: (202)336-8618 

Fax: (202)408-5145 

OPIC backed investment funds (202) 336-8507 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7- 1 2 



The Overseas Private Investment Corporation is an independent agency of the U.S. 
government that promotes economic growth in developing countries by encouraging U.S. 
private investment. The agency assists American investors as follows: financing 
investments through direct loans and loan guarantees; insuring investments against a broad 
range of political risks, and providing a variety of investor services. These services are all 
available for Russia. 

Small Business Administration 

409 Third Street, S.W., Suite 7000 
Washington, DC 20416 

Contact: Cassandra Pulley, Deputy Administrator 
Phone: (202)205-6431 
Fax: (202) 205-6802 

contact: Jean Smith, Export Development Specialist 
Phone: (202) 205-6720 
Fax: (202) 205-7272 

U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency 

Defense Programs and Analysis Division 
Nonproliferation Policy Bureau, Room 4953 
320 21st Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20451 

Contact: Dr. Peter Almquist 
Phone: (202) 647-8250 
Fax: (202) 736-4977 

U.S. Trade and Development Agency 

Room 309, SA-16 
1621 N. Kent Street 
Arlington, VA 22209 

Contact: Dan Stein, Projects Director 
Phone: (703) 875-4357 
Fax: (703) 875-4009 
E-mail: info@tda.gov 

GOVERNMENT - RUSSIA 

Interdepartmental Analytical Center (1AC) 

16, Petrovka St., P.O. Box 163 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv l° vJ o 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7- 1 3 



Moscow, 103756, Russian Federation 

Contacts: Dr. Aleksey K. Ponomarev, Director 

Dr. Sergey K. Kolpakov, Deputy Director 
Phone: (011-7-095)200-44-66 
Fax: (0 1 1 -7-095) 200-44-65 
E-Mail: sim@idacen.msk.su 

The Interdepartmental Analytical Center (IAC) provides analytical and information 
support to Russian governmental departments and commercial structures in the 
fields of conversion innovation and investment projects, technology transfer; 
science and technology policy, and international economic relations. IAC also 
provides management consulting services in the aforementioned areas. 

The first English edition of the book Conversion in Russia contains much useful 
information on Federal Conversion policy and posture, state control over the 
conversion process, and a Federal conversion program with its regional aspects. 
The particular accent is made on scientific, technical and export potential of the 
defense complex, its production competitiveness, technology transfer and 
international cooperation in the conversion sphere. The appendices list the 
defense enterprises whose conversion programs have already met Federal support, 
contain the set of data on legislative regulation of foreign economic activity in the 
Russian Federation and the creation of companies with foreign investments. This 
120-page book is available at $40.00 cod. To order this book, contact Tatiana V. 
Kruglikova at the above numbers. 

Intergovernmental U.S.-Russia Business Development Committee 

(See following pages for organizational charts of U.S. and Russian members of 
Working Groups and contact points. See Chapter Seven for organizational charts 
of Russian groups and contact points.) 

Embassy of the Russian Federation 

2650 Wisconsin Ave., NW 
Washington, DC 20007 

Contact: Vadim Udalov, First Secretary 
Phone: (202)298-5700 
Fax: (202)298-5735 

Russian Trade Representation in the USA 

2001 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 
Washington, DC 20008 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7- 1 4 



Contacts: Yuri V. Akhremenko, Trade Representative of the Russian Federation 
in the United States and Minister Commercial. 

Phone: (202)232-0975 

Telex: 451-324 

Fax: (202)232-2917 

Eugene A. Baranov, Deputy Trade Representative of the Russian Federation in the 
United States and Commercial Counselor 

Boris V. Vladimirov, Senior Specialist: aerospace, telecommunications, nuclear 
industry, chemical and environment 

Pavel A. Yelkin, Senior Specialist: conversion, technology transfer cooperation, 
electronics, information industry, foreign investment through Russian privatization 
program 

Phone: (202)232-5988, (202)232-7170 
Fax: (202) 232-2917 

NON-GOVERNMENT 

ANSER Center for International Aerospace Cooperation (CIAC) 

1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite 800, 
Arlington, VA 22202 

Contact: Stephen Hopkins, Deputy Director 

Phone: (703) 416-8430 

Fax: (703)416-8440 

Internet: ANSERCIAC@ ANSER.ORG 

Moscow office : 

Debra Facktor, Moscow Office Chief 

54 2nd Tverskaya-Yamskaya Ulitsa, Suite 171 

125047 Moscow, Russia 

Phone: (01 1-7-095) 251-5295 
Fax: (011-7-095)250-3783 
E-mail: 76110.342@ compuserve.com 

ANSER CIAC was formed to advance the development and operation of 
aerospace systems by facilitating the flow of information between nations and the 
conduct of scientific and engineering research involving international partnerships 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W% 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-15 



Publications: Decision Maker 's Guide to International Aerospace, Who 's Who in 
Russian Aerospace, Moscow Office Report (a weekly publication which provides 
information on new Degrees of the Russian Federation Council of Ministers). 
ANSER also provides clients visiting Moscow with use of Macintosh and DOS 
compatible computers, color scanners, laser printers, phone, fax and e-mail 
communications to Western countries at all hours of the day. 

ARCTIS 

PromyshlennyaUl., 14A 
St. Petersburg 198095 

Contact: Konstantine Karczmarczyk, General Manager 
Phone: (01 1-7-812) 186-2830, 252-9477, 252-9587 
Fax: (011-7-812) 186-2807 

AWT Consulting and NEWA-ARGE 

Concordiaplatz 2, 
A-1013 Vienna, Austria 



Contact: 


Walter Boltz 


Phone: 


153406314 


Fax: 


15340616 



Publication: Approaching the St. Petersburg Market, Business Report September 
1992 

Business Executives for National Security 

1615 L Street, NW, Suite 330 
Washington, DC 20036-1 152 

Contact: Danielle Marion 
Phone: (202) 296-2125 
Fax: (202) 296-2490 

BENS is a national, non-partisan association of business leaders working to 
improve national security by promoting better management of defense dollars and 
advocating measures to make the economy stronger and more competitive. 

Carroll Publishing Company 

1058 Thomas Jefferson Street, N.W. 
Washington, DC 20007-3832 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7- 1 6 



Phone: (202)333-8620 
Fax: (202) 337-7020 

Publication: Russian Government Today . 

Center for Economic Priorities 

30 Irving Place, 9th floor 
New York, NY 10003 

Contact: Domenick Bertelli, Director of CEP' s Conversion Information Center 
John Tepper Marlin, Chairman of the CIC Board of Advisors 

Phone:(212)420-1133 
Fax: (212)420-0988 

CEP monitors conversion activities in the United States, Russia and around the 
world, publishing Research Reports, occasional papers, and policy 
recommendations. 

Center for International Security and Arms Control 
Stanford University 

320 Galvez Street 
Stanford, CA 94305-6165 

Contact: Katherine Smith, Director, or David Bernstein 

Phone: (415)723-9742 

Publication: Russia Defense Conversion Update, a monthly research review. 

Commersant (The Russian Business Weekly) 

4 Vrubelya Street 
Moscow, 125080 Russia 

Contact: Vladimir Yakovlev, Chairman of Commersant Publishing House 
Phone: (011-7-095)943-9719 
Fax: (011-7-095)943-9719 

Commersant bases its stories on materials provided by Commersant-Daily and 
Commersant newspapers. Commersant was first published in 1908 Suspended in 
1917 for reasons beyond its control, it resumed publication in January 1990 
Commersant is published as a joint project with Refco Group Ltd (ISA) 

Conversion for the Environment International Foundation 

4-13 Zviozdny Blvd., 

U.S. Department of Commerce .Hilv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-17 



129515 Moscow, Russia 

Phone: (01 1-7-095) 286-3587 
Fax: (011-7-095)286-3587 
E-mail: CFE@glas.apc.org 

The Conversion for The Environment Foundation (CFE) is a non-profit, 
independent non-governmental organization with offices in Russia and the 
Netherlands. CFE works to promote the use of defense industry's technologies 
and its potential for peaceful environment protection tasks worldwide. 

Zig-Zag Venture Group 

254 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 1001 USA 

Tel: (212) 725-6700 

Fax: (212) 725-6915; (713) 416-0770 

Max Bravemen, Vice-President of Marketing 
Howard Jacobi, Director of Public Relations 
Moscow office: 69 Prospect Mira, Moscow, 1291 10, Russia 

Astrakhan Chamber of Commerce and Industry 

50 Zhelyabov Street 
Astrakhan, 414040, Russia 
Aleksey D. Kantemirov, President 
Michail A. Witver, Vice-President 
Tel: (8510)24-77-15 
Fax:(8510)24-71-52 

FYI Information Resources 

1413 K Street, N.W., 10th floor 
Washington, DC 20005 

Contact: MarshaEhli, Manager, Project Planning and Development 
Phone: (202)682-2394 
Fax: (202) 682-2399 

FYI Information Resources, a private firm, undertakes proprietary research and 
project development assignments related to business, political, and environmental 
affairs in the Newly Independent States (NIS). Founded in 1988, FYI has 
assembled a research and business operations staff devoted exclusively to NIS 
affairs that communicates regularly with a network of NIS professionals in a wide 
variety of industry and service sectors. FYI has a full time staff in Russia, Ukraine, 
and Kazakhstan. 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7- 1 8 



FYI provides a wide range of services and also publishes and distributes a number 
of directories, reports, and periodicals which focus on doing business in the former 
Soviet Union. 

Gconomics Institute 

14 Hillcrest Avenue 
Middlebury, VT 05753 

Contact: Robert A. Jones, Chairman of the Board 

Michael P. Claudon, President 
Phone: (802) 388-9619 
Fax: (802) 388-9627 

The Geonomics Institute is a private, non-partisan, non-profit organization 
devoted to seeking solutions to international economic problems. Established in 
1987, the Institute brings together small groups of businesspeople, scholars, and 
policy makers from around the world for frank discussions in a seminar setting. 

Publications: Competing for Soviet Business: Reshaping U.S. Foreign Economic 
Policy and American Business Attitudes, Kathryn Wittneben, Geonomics Institute, 
December 1991. "Defense Conversion: Achieving U.S. -Russian Cooperation for 
an Orderly Build-Down and Economic Renewal," a report on Geonomics' 
Gateway Seminar held October 15-18, 1992. 

Greenpeace 

1436 U Street, NW 
Washington, DC 20009 

Contact: Joshua Handler, Research Coordinator 
Phone: (202)319-2516 
Fax: (202) 462-4507 
Telex: 89-2359 

International Action Commission for St. Petersburg 

Co-Chairs: Dr. Henry Kissinger and Mayor Anatoliy Sobchak 

Contact: George Handy Phone: (202) 775-3 1 78 

David Pepper (202) 775-3 1 06 

Eugene A. Baranov Phone: (202) 232-0975 

Deputy Trade Representive CSIS of Russia in the U.S.A. 

Borris V. Vladimirov Phone: (202) 232-5988 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W9t> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7- 1 9 



Manager, Import-Export, (202) 234-7170 

High-Tech Trade & Investment, Fax: (202)232-2917 
Trade Rep. of Russia, Telex: 451-324 

2001 Connecticut Ave., N.W. 
Washington, DC 20008 

The Commission is working on plans to clarify critical issue and to recommend 
near-term actions to reduce obstacles to foreign investment in the St. Petersburg 
region. 

The Commission operates through the following joint Western-Russian Working 
Groups and University Consortium. 

Public Education for Business Growth Unstable Business Conditions, 
Infrastructure, Defense Diversification, Energy Conservation and Management, 
Banking and Investment, Modernization and Development of the Port, 
Agribusiness Development, International University Consortium 

International Center for Information, Inc. (ICI) 

4040 IDS Center 
80 South 8th Street 
Minneapolis, MN 55402 

Contact: Zenas Hutcheson, President 

Phone: (612)376-0643 

Fax: (612) 339-8240 

E-Mail: iciusa@sovusa.com 

ICI publishes information and conducts research on Russian natural resources 
exploration and exploitation, the economics of industry capabilities and 
opportunities, and science & technology achievements and availability. 

ICI publications include the annual Geological Enterprises of Russia and Russian 
and CIS Hard Mineral Geological Enterprises , a quarterly publication providing 
summary descriptions of mineral reserves for which Russia is seeking Western 
development partners. ICI additionally has a series of databases on proven and 
prospective mineral reserves. 

ICI also prepared a transportation directory for the CIS that is a comprehensive 
directory with detailed information on transportation hubs affecting importing and 
exporting to and from the CIS. The directory listings describe: 

— seaports 

~ rail stations 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-20 



— airports 

— customs posts 

— foreign trade transportation offices 

Information on the transportation hubs include seasons open (seaports), types of 
loading /unloading equipment available, and other specifications Listings of 
customs posts and transportation offices include addresses and phone/fax numbers 
A series of regional maps illustrate the transportation routes. 

International Executive Service Corps 

Stamford Harbor park 
333 Ludlow Street 
Stamford, CT 06902 

Mailing Address: P.O. Box 10005, Stamford, Connecticut 06904-2005 

Contact: 

Fred Hudson, Vice President, NIS & Europe 
Robert Monak, Program Manager, NIS & Europe 
Deirdre M. Buell, Project Officer, Russia 
Maria Terry, Project Officer, Russia 

Phone: (203) 967-6000, Toll free Tel: 1-800 243-4372 

Fax: (203) 359-3233 

E-Mail: nisiesc@well.sf.ca.us 

Moscow 

Country Director - Ed Morrison 

Senior Project Manager - Leonid Vorontsov 

Resident Advisor, Defense Conversion - Wilen Sheglik 

Project Manager - Irina Golubych 

25-3 Tsvetnoy Boulevard, 5th Floor, 

Moscow, Russia 103051 

Phone: (01 1-7-501) 929-981 1 (switchboard) 

Fax: • (01 1-7-501) 929-9812 

Easylink: 63779442 

E-mail: iesc.mos@sovcust.sprint.com 

Southern Russia Region 
Regional Country Director - Oleg Maslikov 
Deputy Country Director - Elina Semykina 
Office manager - Helena Sukhova 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv l^> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-21 



17, Soborny Street, Suite 501 
Rostov-On-Don, Russia 344077 
Office Tel: 011-7-8632-62-50-61 
Office Fax: 011-7-8632-62-43-01 
E-mail: iesc.sorussia@sovcust.sprint.com 

St. Petersburg 

Regional Country Director - Andrei Shilenko 

Resident Adviser - David Kerry 

Assistant Resident Advisor - Dimitri Sevalkin 

6 Proletarskoy Diktatury Square, Office 327 

St. Petersburg, Russia 193124 

Office Tel: (01 1-7-812) 271-56-43 or: (01 1-7-812) 271-71-45 

Office Fax: (011-7-812)271-56-45 

Easylink Addesss: 62502420 

E-mail: /g=st.peterburg/s=iesc/o=customers/admd=sovmail/c=su/@sprint.com 

Yekaterinburg 

Country Director - Thomas Korolyov 

Resident Advisor - Timothy Stock 

Deputy Country Director - Galina Vaskova 

44 Schmidta Street, 

Yekaterinburg, Russia 62014 

Phone: (01 1-7-3432) 22-26-37 or (01 1-7-3432) 22-67-36 

Tel/Fax: (01 1-7-3432) 22-26-39 

Tel/Fax: (01 1-7-3432) 22-97-98 

Easylink Address: 62894859 

E-Mail : raymond . j asica@so vcust . @sprint . com 

Vladivostok 

Regional Country Director - Dennis Demaine 

Deputy Director - Vyacheslav Mikhailyk "Slava" 

Sukhanova 3 A, Office 5 

Vladivostok, Russia 690029 

Tel: 011-7-4232-265-321 or 011-7-4232-265-330 

Fax:011-7-4232-267-476 

Easylink Address: 62802931@eln.attmail.com 

Note: 15 hours ahead EST 

The International Executive Service Corps (IESC) has been retained by the Defense 
Nuclear Agency to facilitate joint business initiative that meet the requirements of the 
Nunn-Lugar program. IESC's tasks include assisting with one of more of the following: 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-22 



1) provide additional information to US industry on Russian enterprises qualified for this 
program; 

2) facilitate contacts between the parties; 

3) provide on-site technical assistance to Russian companies in such areas as to- 

a) how to conduct business talks with western companies, 

b) how to develop business plans and other presentations for potential partners, 

c) how to establish contact with potential US partners; 
and 

d) assistance in resulting conversations and negotiations. 

IESC is a not-for-profit organization created in 1964 to provide assistance to the 
private sector in developing countries. These activities are primarily funded by the 
Agency for International Development. IESC is currently active in 55 countries, 
and since 1992 has been particularly active in the New Independent States (NIS) of 
the former Soviet Union. Today, IESC has offices in eight republics of the NIS 
IESC has six offices in Russia - Moscow, St. Petersburg, Rostov-On-Don, 
Krasnoyarsk, Vladivostok and Yekaterinburg - and has provided assistance to over 
350 Russian enterprises, including several of the companies included in this 
directory. 

IESC encourages U.S. companies to contact the Stamford office for more 
information on companies in the NIS. 



International Integration Association (IIA) 
P.O. Box 33 

Moscow, 107120, Russian Federation 

Contact: Sergey V. Kortunov 

Phone: (0 1 1 -7-095) 244- 1 5-23 

Fax: • (011-7-095)253-09-82 

The Association unites Russian leading defense enterprises and research 
institutions in their effort to promote comprehensive integration of Russian hi-tech 
industries into the world market economy. The Association seeks to achieve this 
goal through establishing direct links and ties between its members at home and 
abroad, identifying promising areas and elaborating mutually beneficial joint 
projects and programs of international cooperation, utilizing for this purpose 

U.S. Department of Commerce July l 1 *** 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-23 



Russian advanced technologies, know-how, production and manpower potential in 
such fields as aerospace and nuclear industries, communications, transportation 
and ecology, as well helping to create favorable environment for foreign 
investment in the Russian economy. 

Jeffries & Associates, Inc. 

17200 Hughes Road. 
Poolesville, MD 20837 

Director: Francis J. Jeffries 
Phone: (301) 972-8034 

Pub.: Soviet Economic Conversion: Perceptions, Problems and Prospects, 1990 

KPMG Peat Marwick 

2001 M Street 
Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Francis A. DiBello, Partner 

Matthew Keegan, Senior Consultant 
Phone: (202) 467-3088; (202) 467-3415 
Fax: (202) 293-5457 

KPMG Peat Marwick is an international accounting and management consulting 
firm. With 78,000 employees in 128 countries, the firm has expertise in the full 
range of functional applications ranging from Aerospace, Defense & Commercial 
space to manufacturing, health care, and education. KPMG has been working in 
Russia and Eastern Europe since the early 80' s and currently maintains an office in 
Moscow and the capitals of many of the other eastern Europe nations. 

The Mariska Group, Inc. (MGI) 

96 Woodbine Road 
Stamford, CT 06903 

Contact: Mark D. Mariska, Chairman of the Board 
Phone: (203)329-7747 
Fax: (203) 329-0568 

MGI conducts commercial and consulting operations in the Russian Federation, 
working from offices in Connecticut and in Moscow. Through joint ventures 
registered with the Russian government, MGI is engaged in consumer marketing 
activities across Russia, including a retail store in Moscow selling Russian 
manufactured products. MGI has also formed AKVISTA Insurance Company, a 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-24 



multiple-lines insurance company, in Novokuznetsk (the Kuzbass Basin) 



National Foreign Trade Council, Inc. 

1625 K Street NW 
Washington, DC 20006 

Contact: J. Daniel O'Flaherty, Vice President 

Phone: (202) 887-0278 



Oxford Dictionary Project 

c/o Office of the Graduate Studies 
Fordham University 
Lincoln Center Campus 
140 West 62nd Street 
New York, NY 10023-7485 

16 Stuyvesant Oval, #9D 
New York, NY 10009 

Contact: Ilona Kloupte-Dufry 

Phone: (212)995-0023 

Fax: (212) 995-0023 

The Oxford Dictionary Project is presently preparing the first Russian-English- 
Russian Dictionary of Business and Economic Terms The Project is a joint 
effort by a team of scholars from the Russian Academy of Sciences at the Institute 
of World Economy and International Relations and a team from Fordham 
University School of Law. Once current funding obstacles are surmounted, the 
Project expects to have the Dictionary published by the Oxford University Press in 
mid- 1995. 

Russian Business Publications Associates 

1316 Third Street 

Suite 3 1 1 

Santa Monica, C A 90401 

Contact: Sergei Zamascikov 

Phone (310)395-0707 

Fax: (310)451-4580 

Russian Business Publications Associates is a California-based company. 

U.S. Department of Commerce July W*>6 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-25 



specializing in providing information and consulting services to companies and 
entrepreneurs interested in the exciting emerging markets. 

They have recently published the first issue of a newsletter called Business 
Opportunities in Russia (BOR). BOR offers a variety of concrete investment, 
joint-venture and trade opportunities, made available directly by the Russian 
principals for BOR subscribers. It tells of business opportunities in Russia and 
elsewhere in the former Soviet Union. Every issue will feature a business and 
economic profile of a Russian republic, region or oblast. BOR's staff is also ready 
to assist interested companies an individuals with marketing, feasibility, risk 
assessment studies, and provides negotiation and legal assistance in Russia. 

Russia Business Publications Associates began publishing a newsletter on 
corporate security and risk assessment in Russia and a digest of recent Russian 
scientific achievements. 

RinC International Publications 

P.O. Box 21266 
Washington, DC 20009 

Contact: Oleg Konstantinov 

Phone: (202)483-5114 

Fax: (202) 265-8750 

Russia in Conversion (RinC) is a twice-monthly newsletter providing information 
and analysis of defense industry and ownership conversion opportunities in Russia 
and the Independent States. It includes several sections (US and Western Aid; 
Legislation; Aerospace; MTNATOM/Closed Cities; Business Profile; and 
Conferences), and has a network of correspondents I the ten largest industrial 
cities of the former Soviet Union. 

Russian Business Journal, St. Petersburg Business Report 

60 East 42nd Street, Room 3219 
New York, NY 10165 

Contact: Robert Kaufman, Creative Strategies Inc., USA 
Phone: (212)682-2977 
Fax: (212) 682 0373 

Russian Business Journal is a monthly four-color magazine about doing business in Russia: 
market conditions, investments, rules and regulations, industry analysis, written in English 
by editors in Russia for US and Canadian businessmen. The St. Petersburg Business 
Report is a bi-monthly newsletter written by the same editors in English, with special 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-26 



emphasis on business and cultural conditions in St. Petersburg. The Russian contact for 
both is Redd, P.O. 151, 191014, St. Petersburg, Russia. Phone and fax: 7-612-275-8466 

Sovconsult, Inc. 

1250 Connecticut Ave., NW 
Suite 700 
Washington, DC 20036 

Phone: (202) 637-9123 
Fax: (202) 785-4360 

SOVCONSULT is a business consultancy facilitating business, trade and 
investment opportunities between Western firms and organizations in Russia and 
the Newly Independent States. SOVCONSULT represents the Defense Industrial 
Investment Company (DIIC), a western style investment banking firm formed to 
address the need for Russian/NIS defense organizations to make the transition 
from state-run enterprises to independent, private and profitable ventures. Among 
other affiliations in Russia and the NIS are the Institute for Defense Studies 
(INOBIS) and the Etalon Institute, working in the areas of defense conversion and 
telecommunications. SOVCONSULT is headquartered in Washington, DC with 
offices in Los Angeles and Moscow. 

Soviet American Venture Initiative (SAVI) 

University of Maryland-College of Behavioral and Social Sciences 

USSR Academy of Sciences 

Central Economics and Mathematical Institute (TsEMI) 

Contact: Dr. Warren R. Phillips 

Department of Government and Politics 

2181 LeFrandHall 

University of Maryland at College Park 

College Park, MD 20742-8221 

Phone:(301)405-4137 

Dr. Zurab Yakobasvili 

USSR Academy of Sciences, TsEMI 

32 Krasikova 

Moscow 117418 

Phone: (011-7-095) 129-64-91 

A U.S. -Soviet joint venture promoting bilateral and multilateral economic and 
scientific interests in the U.S. and USSR, in the fields of: conversion; technology 
transfer; ecology; energy; agriculture and agriculture distribution systems, building 

U.S. Department of Commerce July W96 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-27 



and land use development; telecommunications and networking. 

U.S.-Russia Business Council 

1701 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. 
Suite 650 
Washington, DC 20006 

Contact: Robert Strauss, President 

Eugene Lawson, Executive VP 
Phone: (202) 956-7666 

Fax: (202) 956-7674 

United States Council for International Business 

1212 Avenue of the Americas 
New York, NY 10036-1689 
Phone: (212)354-4480 

U.S.-Russia Defense Conversion Subcommittee Members 

U.S. Vice-Chair 

Barry E. Carter 

Deputy Under Secretary for Export Administration 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

Contact: Daniel C. Hurley, Jr. 
Phone: (202)482-1455 
Fax: (202)482-2387 
E-mail: dhurley@doc.gov 

Members 

Ambassador Richard Morningstar 
Coordinator for NTS Technical Assistance 
U.S. Department of State 

Ashton Carter 

Assistant Secretary for International Security Policy 

U.S. Department of Defense 

Ambassador John Ferch 

Deputy Under Secretary for International Affairs 

U.S. Department of Labor 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-28 



Richard Williamson 

Deputy Assistant Secretary for Export Assistance 

U.S. Department of Energy 

Paul Ashin 

Program Analysis and Coordination Office 

U.S. Agency for International Development 

Michael Froman 

Deputy Assistant Secretary for Eurasia & the Middle East 

U.S. Treasury Department 

Perter Almquist 

Defense Control Specialist 

U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency 



U.S.-Russia Defense Conversion Subcommittee 

Russian Co-Chair 

Valeriy Mikhaylov 

Chief, Department of Defense Industries, 

Russian Cabinet of Ministers 

Members 

Yevgeniy Aleksandrovich Rogovsky 

Chief of Department 

Ministry of Foreign Economic Relations 

Sergey Vadimovich Kortunov 
Chief of Department 
Ministry of Foreign Affairs 

Boris Dmitrievich Urlov 
Chief of Department 
Ministry of Science of Russia 

Vladimir Grigorievich Vinogradov 
Chairman of Committee 
Ministry of Atomic Energy 



U.S. Department of Commerce Julv l 1 ^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-29 



Valeriy Aleksandrovich Dementyev 
Deputy Chief of Head Department 
Ministry of Defense 

Alexey Konstantinovich Ponomarev 

Director of the Inter-Departmental Analytical Center 

Albert Fyodorovich Trifonov 
Russian Committee for the Defense 
Sectors of Industry 

Vladimir Vasilievich Salo 
Chief of Department 
Ministry of Economy 



SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF DIRECTORIES AND PUBLICATIONS 

American Business Involvement in Defense Conversion in the Former Soviet Union: 
Opportunities, Constraints, and Recommendations. Presents problems and 
opportunities in Ukrainian and Russian defense conversion. Also discusses 
U.S. government and private sector involvement in Russian defense conversion. Kathryn 
Wittneben, American Committee on U.S. -Independent States Relations, December 1992. 
Phone (202) 234-7370. 

A Guide for National Export Control Programs . U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau 
of Export Administration, September 1993. C/o Bruce Cromack; (202) 482-4252 

Post-Soviet Business Monitor. Focuses on topics connected with defense conversion in 
the former Soviet states. S.I.M./Exchange Publications and Business-TASS, 2014 P 
Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 20036. Phone: 800-776-1314; Fax: 202-296- 
2805. 

Post-Soviet Nuclear Complex Monitor. Focuses on nuclear materials management and 
facility cleanup, as well as dismantlement of the Soviet nuclear complex. S.I.M./Exchange 
Publications and Business-TASS, 2014 P. Street, N.W., Suite 300, Washington, DC 
20036. Phone: 800-776-1314; Fax: 202-296-2805. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 7-30 



CHAPTER 8 - SOURCES OF FINANCING 

FUNDS BACKED BY U.S. GOVERNMENT AND 
MULTILATERAL INSTITUTIONS 



INVESTMENT FUNDS OPERATING IN THE NIS 

(Condensed from BISNIS publication: Sources of Finance for Trade and 
and Investment in the NIS, August 1995, and other sources) 

Investment funds operating in the Newly Independent States (NIS) vary widely. A key 
difference is that between funds supported by the U.S. Government and multilateral 
institutions, versus those managed by private firms without government support. U.S. 
Government and multilateral funds work as venture capital funds in the NIS, where they 
can provide start-up financing and are receptive to strategic partners, including the U.S. 
partners. Private funds, often having entered the market solely because of new 
opportunities in portfolio investment, are not interested in providing venture capital. All 
funds are expected to be self-financing and chose investments based on their prospect of 
their long-term success. 

This list is not comprehensive and will change as more information becomes available. 
Privately-managed funds are listed alphabetically and are included here for 
informational purposes only. Inclusion in this list does not constitute U.S. government 
endorsement of any private fund 



FUNDS BACKED BY U.S. GOVERNMENT AND MULTILATERAL 
INSTITUTIONS 



AGRIBUSINESS PARTNERS INTERNATIONAL 

Region: NIS 

Manager: ' America First Companies 

Capitalization: OPIC guarantee: $100 million. Still raising capital. 

Funds invested: n/a 

investment objective: Equity and debt. Interested in start-ups and joint ventures 

U.S. Department of Commerce .hilv NOf. 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 8- 1 



4 



Industries: 

Additional notes: 
Contact: 



Approximately $5 to 10 million. 

Agriculture, broadly defined. Includes food firms, infra-structure 
projects, privatization, food storage and distribution facilities 



Mr. Robert Peyton 

America First Companies 

1004 Farnam Street, Omaha, NE 68102 

Phone: (402 444-1630 

Fax: (402) 345-8966 



ALLIED CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL SMALL BUSINESS FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds invested: 



Global 

Allied Capital Advisors 

OPIC guarantee: $20 million 

n/a 



Invest. Objective: Equity investments in firms sponsored by qualifying U.S. small 

businesses. 

Industries: Basic manufacturing and service industries 

Additional notes: 

Contact: Mr. Cabell Williams II, President 

Allied Capital Corporation 
1666 K. Street, NW, 9th Floor 
Washington, D.C. 20006 
Phone: (202)331-1112 
Fax: (202) 659-2053 

CARESBAC-St. Petersburg 

Region: Russia (St. Petersburg area). 

Manager: Small Enterprise Assistance Funds (SEAF), formerly the CARE 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-2 



July 1996 



Capitalization: 
Funds invested: 
Invest. Objective: 



Industries: 



Additional notes: 



Contact: 



Small Business Assistance Corporation 

U.S. Department of Agriculture: $3,500,00 grant. 

$737,750 (April, 1995) 

Equity (minority position), and long-term debt. SEAF funds 
operate on commercially-sustainable principles, investing primarily 
through equity in amounts from $75,000 to $250,000, with an 
average size of $150,000. Small to medium-sized businesses of 
between 15 and 100 employees with majority Russian ownership 
and an annual ruble turnover of between $100,000 and $2 million 
are preferred. 

Food processing and distribution, "green" enterprises, light 
manufacturing, construction industry suppliers and business service 
providers. 

Technical support to investees will be provided through 
organizations such as the Citizens' Democracy Corps, the 
International Executive Service Corps and the Volunteers in 
Overseas Cooperative Assistance. 

190008, St. Petersburg, Russia 
Lermontovsky Prospekt 7, 2nd Floor 
David Lingelbach, General Director 
Phone: ++7 (812) 114-2632 
Fax: ++7(812) 119-6337 

Thomas Gibson, President 

Small Enterprise Assistance Fund 

1401 New York Avenue, NW, Suite 1000 

Washington, D.C. 20005 

Phone: (202)737-8463 

Fax: (202) 737-5536 



CEENIS PROPERTY FUND, L.P. 



Region: 

Manager: 

Capitalization: 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



NIS Eastern and Central Europe 

Auberndale Central Europe Reality Management, Inc. 

OPIC guarantee: $20 million plus private capital 

8-3 



Juh 1** 



4 



Funds Invested: 



N/A 



Investment Objective: Property development 



Industries: 

Additional notes: 
Contact: 



Light manufacturing, office, warehouse and distribution center 
development projects. 

Will also develop property held on long term leases 

Mr. Christopher X. Soles, Managing Director, 

CEENIS Property Fund 

327 Washington Street, 3rd Floor 

Wellesley, MA 02181 

Phone:(616)431-2600 

Fax: (617)431-1007 

Internet: 103275. 2107@ compuserve.com 



THE CENTRAL ASIAN-AMERICAN ENTERPRISE FUND 



Region: 



Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Uzbekistan, Tajikistan 
and Turkmenistan. 



Manager: 
Capitalization: 

Funds Invested: 
Invest. Objective: 



Industries: 



Central Asian- American Enterprise Fund, Inc. . 

U.S. Government: $150 million over the next two to three years. 
Additional funds sought from private sector co-investment. 

$3 million (May, 1995) 

Equity and debt financing to small and medium sized 
enterprises that are commercially viable and offer a reasonable 
prospect for an acceptable rate of return on investment. 
Investments must be accompanied by local invest component. 
Joint ventures with financial participation encouraged, with 
preference given to U.S. partners but others from Europe and Asia 
also accepted. Typical investments will range from $500,000 up to 
$5,000,000. 

Enterprises in infra-structural development such as food processing, 
distribution and transportation, as well as consumer goods and 
services. 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-4 



July 1996 



Additional Notes: Technical assistance will be provided alongside investment. 

The Fund also administers a small business loan program through 
the Asia Crossroads Loan Co. Individual loans will range from 
$1,000 to $50,000 and will have a maturity of up to three years. 

Contact: Central Asian-American Enterprise Fund 

595 Madison Avenue 
New York, NY 10022 
ph.: (212)826 2100 
Fax: (212) 826 8844 

Central Asian- American Enterprise Fund 
1 , Turab Tula Street 
Tashkent 700066, Uzbekistan 
Ph: ++7(3712)89 1135 
Fax: ++7(3712)89 11 38 

Central Asian- American Enterprise Fund 
531, Seyfullina Street 
Almaty 480083, Kazakhstan 
Ph: ++7(3272)637 086 
Fax: ++7 (3272) 694 589 

Central Asian- American Enterprise Fund 
219 Chui Prospect 
Bishkek, Kyrgyz Republic 
Ph: ++7(3312)264 295 
Fax: ++7 (3312) 621 230 

DEFENSE ENTERPRISE FUND 

Region: Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan and Belarus. 

Manager: Defense Enterprise Fund, Inc.. 

Capitalization: Department of Defense: $27 million. 

Funds Invested: Approximately $13 million. 

Invest. Objective: Equity and debt. The fund will make investments only in joint 

ventures involving privatized enterprises or enterprises that commit 
in writing to privatization. An enterprise will be considered 
privatized when greater than 50% of the ownership and controls is 

U.S. Department of Commerce Jvilv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 8-5 



in the private sector. At least one of the partners in any joint 
venture should be from a country outside the NIS, with preference 
given to joint ventures with U.S. involvement. Investments will be 
diversified among smaller enterprises or spin-off enterprises that 
have converted or are in the process of converting, and start-ups 
formed by former defense or military personnel. Investments range 
from $1 to $8 million. 



Industries: 



Enterprises that include personnel and/or facilities currently of 
formerly involved in research, development, production or 
operation and support of the defense sector of four Republics of the 
former Soviet Union. Particular emphasis given to facilities which 
helped to produce weapons of mass destruction, as well as firms 
associated with the production of command, control and 
communications equipment for military forces associated with these 
weapons. 



Additional Notes: 



Contact: 



Tom Maletta, Chief Financial Officer 

Defense Enterprise Fund 

20 Custom House Street Ste. 1040 

Boston, MA 021 10 

Ph: (617)261 1929 

Fax: (617) 261 1935 



Eurasia Foundation 

1527 New Hampshire Avenue, NW 
Washington, DC 20036 

Contact: Kathryn Wittneben, Senior Program Officer 

Phone: (202) 234-7370 

Fax: (202) 234-7377 

E-mail: eurasia@eurasia.org 

The Eurasia Foundation is a privately managed grant-making organization 
established with financing from the U.S. Agency for International Development 
(AID). The Eurasia Foundation supports technical assistance, training, educational 
and policy programs in the New Independent States (NIS) of the former Soviet 
Union (excluding the Baltic States) covering a wide range of activities in 
economic and democratic reform. Eurasia Foundation grants will be made to 
American organizations with partners in the NIS and directly to NIS organizations. 
The Eurasia Foundation's initial programmatic focus will include the areas of 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-6 



July 1996 



private sector development, public sector reform, and media and 
communications. 

European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) 

One Exchange Square 
London EC2A 2EH 
United Kingdom 

Contact: Office of the U.S. Executive Director 
Phone: (01 1-7-44-71) 338-6569, 338-6569 

EBRD, the newest of the world's five multilateral development banks, began 
operation in April of 1 99 1 . It is the first international institution to provide 
financing exclusively in Eastern and Central Europe and the former Soviet Union. 
Based in London, the EBRD is capitalized at ECU 10 billion (about 13 billion U.S. 
dollars). Fifty-three member countries, the European Economic Community and 
the European Investment Bank are represented on its board of directors. The 
United States, which holds 10 percent of the shares, is the largest single member 
country shareholder, while the European Community nations have 5 1 percent. 

The U.S. Executive Director supports the U.S. business community, assuring that 
U.S. companies directly benefit and participate in the Bank's procurement 
activities and financing. Companies are encouraged to bring potential projects to 
the Office of the U.S. Executive Director. Information regarding Bank policies 
and procedures is available from a number of sources, including the Office of 
Multilateral Development Banks, USDOC, and the National Trade Data Bank. 



FAR EAST REGIONAL VENTURE FUND 

Region: Russian Far East. 

Manager: Daiwa Institute of Research, Ltd. 

Capitalization: EBRD: $30 million, additional capital sought from private 

investors. 

Invest. Objective: The fund is intended to facilitate modernization, expansion and'or 

restructuring of privatized enterprises. A key criterion is strong 
management. Investments will range from $300,000 to S3 million 

Industries: Enterprises in infra structural development such as food processing, 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 8-7 



distribution and transportation, as well as consumer goods and 
services. 



Additional Notes: Technical assistance will be provided alongside investment. 

The Fund also administers a small business loan program through 
the Asia Crossroads Loan Company. Individual loans will range 
from $1,000 to $50,000 and will have a maturity of up to three 
years. 

No hard liquor, tobacco or firearms, must have a western partner. 



contact: 



Jiro Yamana 

Daiwa Institute of Research, Ltd. 

15-6FuyukiKoto-KU 

Tokyo 135 

Ph: ++81(3)5620 5123 

Fax: ++81 (3)5620 5610 



FIRST NIS REGIONAL FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 

capitalization: 



NIS (60% Russia), Baltics. 

Baring International Investment Management limited 
Sovlink- American Corporation, Investment Advisor 
Tokobank, Local Advisor 

OPIC guarantee: $180 million. 



Investment objective: Equity, possibly convertible debt or warrants. The fund will seek 

whenever possible to invest in companies with foreign currency 
revenues or substantial export earnings potential. Investments may 
take the form of corporate partnerships with leading foreign 
partners, later stage equity financings or investment in newly 
privatized entities. Investments will range in size from $2 million to 
$10 million. 



Industries: 



Contact: 



About 60% targeted toward natural resource-related companies 
and infrastructure, including telecommunications. Also light 
manufacturing, consumer products and services, real estate. 



Nancy Curtain, Director, Institutional Group 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-8 



July 1996 



Richard Sobel, Director, Institutional Group 

Baring International Investment Management 

155 Bishopsgate 

London EC2M3XY, England 

Ph: ++44(171)214 1708/1871 

Fax:++44(214)214 1725 

Douglas P. Warwick, Senior Vice President 

Michael Calvey, Vice President 

Sovlink- American Corporation 

1221 Avenue of the Americas 

New York, NY 10020 

Ph: (212)730-4868 

Fax:(212)730-2871 

Alexei A. Mateev, Managing Director 
7, Masha Poryvayeva Street 
Moscow 107078, Russia 
Ph: ++7(501)204-70-44 
Fax: ++7 (095) 975-25-78/79 



FRAMLINGTON RUSSIAN INVESTMENT FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 
Invest. Objective: 



Industries: 



Russia. 

Framlington Investments. 

Approximately $100 million. EBRD: $16 million, IFC: $8 million. 

Approximately two-thirds. 

Equity position of anywhere from 10-40% is possible, though 20% 
is preferred. 80% of the funds invested in the first year will go to 
companies with largely western control, however, projects will also 
include those with western minority shareholders Investments will 
be between $500,000 - $4 million, with projected average of 
around $2 million. Projects requiring less than $500,000 can be 
considered if anticipated future financing requirements will raise the 
Fund's total contribution above $500,000. 

Open to any new economically sound proposal 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Julv 1** 



8-9 



Additional Notes: No hard liquor, tobacco or firearms, must have a western partner. 

Contact: Gary C. Fitzgerald, Managing Director 

Robert Jenkins 

Framlington Russian Investment Fund 
155 Bishopsgate 

London EC2M3XJ, United Kingdom 
Ph: ++44(171)374-4100 
Fax: ++44(171)382-6432 

Connell Gallagher, Investment Analyst 

30 Konushkovskaya ul. 

123242 Moscow, Russia 

Satellite Ph: ++7 (501) 253 4688/253 4689 

Local Ph: 253 46 88/89 

Satellite Fax: ++7 (501) 253 46 79 

Local Fax: 253 46 79 



FUND FOR LARGE ENTERPRISES IN RUSSIA 



See U.S. -RUSSIA INVESTMENT FUND. 



GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT EMERGING MARKETS FUND 



Region: 

Managers: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 
Investment Objective: 



NIS as well as emerging markets in Asia, Latin America, 
Europe, the Middle East and Africa. 

Global Environment Management Corp. 

$70 million. OPIC guarantee: $50 million. 

Approximately $20 million. 

Equity or equity related investments. The fund seeks 
significant minority positions in operating companies or 
projects with demonstrated cash flows, significant long-term 
revenue growth potential and high anticipated margins of 
profits from operations. Projected rates of return to the 
investor should substantially exceed the current risk-free 
return available in individual markets, with additional 
consideration for risks related to the volatility and 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-10 



July 1996 



Industries: 



Additional Notes: 



Contact: 



convertibility of currency and the degree of liquidity for the 
investor. Investments of up to $10 million. 

Environment-oriented industries, especially those engaged 
in developing, financing, operating or supplying 
infrastructure projects related to the delivery of clean energy 
(natural gas and renewable sources) and potable water; also 
wastewater treatment. 

Portfolio companies can arrange for OPIC investment 
insurance against certain political risks and debt financing 
for projects that involve significant U.S. ownership. 

Mr. H. Jeffrey Leonard, President 
Global Environment Management Corp. 
1201 New York Ave., NW Suite 220 
Washington, DC 20005 
Phone: (202)789-4500 
Fax: (202) 789-4508 



MAJOR PROJECTS FUND 



Not yet launched. 
Managers: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 
Investment Objective: 
Industries: 

Additional Notes: 
Contact: 



American International Group 

OPIC guarantee: $300 million. 

N/A 

Equity investments 

Large infrastructure projects including power, 
transportation, natural resource development and related 
industries. 

N/A 

Mr. Gordon H. Taylor 
American International Group 
70 Pine Street 
New York, NY 10270 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Julv lOv* 



S-ll 



NEW RUSSIA SMALL BUSINESS INVESTMENT FUND 



Region: 
Managers: 



Capitalization: 



Funds Invested: 



Investment Objective: 



Industries: 



Russia: Moscow, additional cities anticipated. 

New Russia Small Business Investment Fund, Inc., a wholly 
owned subsidiary of the non-profit Fund for Democracy and 
Development Corporation "NRSBIF", a wholly owned 
Russian operating subsidiary of NRSBIF. 

U.S. Department of Agriculture: Additional capital will be 
raised from private sources. 

$3,650,000 (July, 1995) 

The NRSBIF extends financing to small Russian businesses 
and Russian-U.S. joint ventures through Russian 
commercial banks. Businesses normally eligible for 
NRSBIF support will employ less than 200 employees, have 
no more than 25% state ownership and have an asset value 
of less than the U.S. dollar equivalent of $2,500,000. 
Initially financing will be in the rubles, but the Fund hopes 
to eventually offer dollar financing. Investments currently 
range from $50,000 to $200,000, in rubles. 

Diversified. 



Additional Notes: 



This program was created to promote sound commercial 
lending in Russia. Lending is provided through selected 
Russian commercial banks. 



Contact: 



Jack I. Healer, President 
NRSBIF 

1 50 1 M Street, NW, 7th Floor 
Washington, DC 20005 
Phone: (202)466-4700 
Fax: (202) 223-4826 
e-mail: 5628502@mcimail.com 

Vladimir A. Drovossekov, General Director 
Corporation "NrsbiF" 
Dokuchaev Pereulok #4 
107078 Moscow, Russia 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-12 



July 1996 



Satellite Ph/Fax: ++7(501-883-7095 
Local Phone: ++7 (095) 975 4982 
(975) 1488/207 8483 
e-mail: fddcis@sovam.com 



NEW EUROPE EAST INVESTMENT FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 
Investment Objective: 

Industries: 
Additional Notes: 

Contact: 



NIS, Central and Eastern Europe 

Capital Research International (London) 

$130 million. ERBD: $25 million. IFC: $8 million 

Only one Russian investment as of end 1994. 

Equity, up to 20% stake. Interested in privatized companies 
or newly established ventures that have some Western 
management. Investments range from $5 - $15 million. 

Diversified 

No hard liquor, tobacco or firearms, must have a western 
partner. 

Lam Nguyen-Phuong, Vice President 

or Koenraad Foulon 

Capital Research International 

25 Bedford Street 

London WC2E9HN 

Ph: ++44(171)257 6700,257 6764 

Fax: ++44(171)257 6767 



REGIONAL VENTURE FUND FOR RUSSIAN COMPANIES IN FAR EAST AND 
EASTERN SIBERIA 



Region: 

Manager: 

Capitalization: 



Russian Far East and Eastern Siberia. 

n/a 

n/a 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Juh 1** 



8-13 



Funds Invested: 
Investment Objective: 

Industries: 
Contact: 



n/a 



Equity investment in private sector enterprises (maximum 
25% state-owned) with up to 5,000 employees. Preferred 
minimum is $300,000, maximum $1.5 million. 

Diversified. 

Mr. Martin Nicholls 

Regional Fund for Russian Companies in Far East and 

Eastern Siberia, c/o EBRD 

One Exchange Square 

London EC2A 2EH, United Kingdom 

Ph: +44 171 338 6269 

Fax: +44 171 338 6119 



RUSSIA PARTNERS FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 

Capitalization: 



Funds Invested: 



Investment Objective: 



Industries: 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Russia/NIS 

Paine Webber Incorporated 

Mitchell Hutchins Asset Management, Investment Advisor 

EEC Company, Local Advisor 

Closed at $155 million in 1994, however, now opened for a 
second subscription for up to $200 million. Fully insured by 
OPIC. Russian government: $5 million, and has given a 
$20 million "back-door" guarantee. 



n/a 



Equity and quasi-equity securities of both new and 
expanding enterprises in Russia, including newly privatized. 
No more than 15% of the Fund's assets will be invested in 
any one portfolio company nor more than 25% in any one 
business sector ventures. Companies with Western strategic 
partners are considered desirable. The average investment 
size is $2 to $10 million. 

Telecommunications, manufacturing, natural resource 
processing, pharmaceuticals and consumer goods. No 
investments that will cause environmental damage in Russia, 



8-14 



July 1996 



gg 



or that will have a deleterious impact on the U.S. economy. 

Additional Notes: Whenever possible, the Fund will attempt to use its 

investment to leverage loans from other sources, such as 
EBRD or the IFC. 

Contact: Drew Guff, First Vice President 

Paine webber Incorporated 
1285 Avenue of the Americas 
New York, NY 10019 
Phone: (212)713-3214 
Fax: (212)713-1087 

Lauralee Raddatz, Analyst 
Paine Webber Incorporated - Russia 
Phone: ++7(095)207 9140 
Fax: ++7(095)925 7917 



RUSSIA SMALL BUSINESS FUND 

Facility to provide credits for micro and small enterprises in Russia, provided by European 
Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) 

The EBRD has established links with various financial intermediaries to provide financing 
for projects that are too small to be funded directly. The EBRD also assists small- and 
medium-sized companies in ways not directly related to project finance, but include trade 
facilitation and guarantee facilities extended to local financial institutions. These programs 
include: 

1. Equity Participation in Investment or Venture Capital Funds 

2. Equity Participation in Investment or Commercial Banks 

3. Bank to Bank Loans 

4. Co-financing Projects Together with Local Investment of Commercial 
Banks 

5. Co-financing Projects Together with Foreign Banks (CEAL) 

The EBRD has established a line of co-financing with the International Moscow Bank 
This financing is available only for private sector enterprises. Loans range from $500,000 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 8-15 



to $8 million. 

The Russia Small Business Fund provides loans for financing small enterprises (fewer than 
50 employees). Finance is available in U.S. dollars and rubles indexed to dollars. It offers 
loans up to $50,000 and, in exceptional circumstances, up to $75,000. An additional 
component of this fund is the micro credit facility providing loans from $100 to $30,000 
for a period of 1-24 months. The Small Business Fund is currently operating in Nizhny 
Novgorod, Novosibirsk, Tomsk, Tula, Togliatti, Samara, and St. Petersburg. 

Contact: Mr. Dmitry Mercuriew 

International Moscow Bank 
Ul. Pushkinskaya 5/6 
103009 Moscow, Russia 
Phone: +7-501-944-1002 
Fax: +7-501-944-1009 



EBRD Russia Small Business Fund Contact Information 

Nizhny Novgorod 

Association Commercial Bank 

ul. Beketova 73 

603600 Nizhny Novgorod, Russia 

Lubov N. Guseva 

Phone: +7 8312-689-206 

Fax: +7 8312-683-450 

Nizhegorodsky Bankirsky Dom Bank 

Ploschad Gorkogo 6 

603000 Nizhny Novgorod, Russia 

Andrei Morov 

Phone: +7 8312-333-337 

Fax: +7 8312-343-948 

Sberbank 

ul. Bolshaya Pokrovskaya 3 

603005 Nizhny Novgorod, Russia 

Evgeniy Bolonin 

Phone: +7 8312-390-852 

Fax: +7 8312-391-583 

Novosibirsk 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 8- 1 6 



Mosbusiness Bank 

ul. Lenina 12 

630099 Novosibirsk, Russia 

Anatoly Zviglin 

Phone: +7 3832-22-09-41 

Fax: +7 3822-22-18-31 

Kuzbassotsbank 

pr. Lenina 90/4 

Kemerovo 

630099 Novosibirsk, Russia 

Nelly Morozenko 

Phone; +7 3842-539-900 

Fax: +7 3842-537-677 

Tomsk 

Mosbusiness Bank 
ul. Lazareva 3a 
634040 Tomsk, Russia 
Vladimir Gonchar 
Tel/Fax: +7 3822-768-571 

Kuzabassotsbank 
ul. Gertsena 18 
634050 Tomsk, Russia 
Nikolai Potapov 
Phone: +7 3822-233-304 
Fax: +7 3822-232-552 

Tula 

Orbitabank 
Komsomolskaya 54 
300002 Tula 2, Russia 
Tayana V. Igonina 
Tel/Fax: +7 0872-775-327 

First Commercial Tula Bank 
ul. Oktyabrasjaya 36 
300002 Tula, Russia 
Sergey Isaev 
Phone: +7 0872-345-977 

U.S. Department of Commerce July loo<, 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 8- 1 7 



Fax: +7 0872-772-079 

Mosbusiness Bank 
Krasnoarmeisty Proezd 25 
300341 Tula, Russia 
Mr. Shimayev 
Tel/Fax: +7 0872-316-789 

Togliatta and Samara 

Avtovazbank 

ul. Novopromyshlennaya 22a 
445009 Togliatti, Russia 
Elena F. Yefimova 
Phone: +7 8469-221-797 
Fax: +7 8469-221-708 

St. Petersburg 

Petrovsky Commercial Bank 
ul. Ruzovskaya 8 
198013 St. Petersburg, Russia 
Marina Kanunnikova 
Phone: +7 812-167-1512 
Fax: +7 812-316-7443 

Mosbusiness Bank 
pr. Metallistov 115 
195197 St. Petersburg 
Alexey A. Stoletov 
Tel/Fax: +7 812-540-6824 

Avtovazbank 
ul. 2-ya Sovetskaya 3/7 
193036 St. Petersburg 
Maria A. Gibizova 
Phone: +7 812-277-4836 
Fax: +7 812-277-4180 



RUSSIAN TECHNOLOGY FUND (RTF) 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 8-18 



Contact: 



Mr. Valentine Levitsky, Investment Manager, 

RTF- St. Petersburg, 

27 Millionaya Street, Apt.49, 

St. Petersburg, Russia, 191186 

Ph: (812)312-4302 

Fax:(812)311-7758 

E-mail: naukaspb@sovamsu.sovusa.com 



The Russian Technology Fund invests in small Russian companies which are focussed 
primarily in the commercial exploitation of technology products in the domestic markets, 
although transfer of technology abroad may also be financed. RTF investments are 
primarily in equity and range from $200,000 to $500,000. RTF is a State of Delaware 
limited partnership based in New Jersey. The principal investors are the EBRD and the 
IFC which account for 50 percent of the fund's total commitment. Other investors are the 
Finish National Fund for Research and Development (SITRA), Top Technology Limited 
and Nauka Service, a St. Petersburg-based association. 



SMALL ENTERPRISE EQUITY FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 



Russia (Nizhny Novgorod area). 

Small Enterprise Assistance Funds (SEAF), formerly CARE 
Small Business Assistance Corporation. 



Capitalization: 



Funds Invested: 



ERBD: $5 million. 

SEAF is in the process of making four investments, no dollar 
amount given (July 1995). 



Investment objective: Equity (minority position), and long-term debt. Small-to medium- 
sized businesses of between 15 and 100 employees with majority 
Russian ownership and an annual ruble turnover of between 
$100,000 and $2 million are preferred. SEAF funds operate on 
commercially-sustainable principles, investing primarily through 
equity in amounts from $75,000 to $250,000 with an average size 
of $150,000. 



Industries: 



Food processing and distribution, "green" enterprises, light 
manufacturing, construction industry-suppliers and business service 
providers. 



Additional Notes: Technical support to investees will be provided through 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



lul\ 



8-19 



Contact: 



organizations such as the Citizens' Democracy Corps, the 
International Executive Service Corps and the Volunteers in 
Overseas Cooperative Assistance. No hard liquor, tobacco or 
firearms, must have a western partner. 

Russia.Nizhny Novgorod 603000 
150 Gorky Street, Rm. 707 
John McGuire, General Director 
Phone: ++7 (8312) 35 42 85 
Fax: ++7(8312)35 43 45 

Thomas C. Gibson, President 
Small Enterprise Assistance Funds 
1401 New York Ave., NW, Suite 1000 
Washington, DC 20005 
Phone: (202)737 8463 
Fax: (202) 737 5536 



SMOLENSK REGIONAL VENTURE FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 



Smolensk Oblast, Russia 

Siparex 

$20 million. EBRD: $12 million. 

n/a 



Investment objective: Equity of up to 49% of capital. This fund will concentrate on 

facilitating modernization, expansion, and/or restructuring of 
privatized companies. Investments range from $300,000 to $1.2 
million. 



Industries: 



No hard liquor, tobacco or firearms, must have a western partner. 



Additional Notes: The Fund will provide some technical assistance alongside 

investment. 



Contact: 



Mr. Philippe Lambert, Investment Manager 

Siparex 

139 rue Vendome 

69006 Kyon, France 

Phone: ++33 7852 41 07 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-20 



July 1996 



Fax: ++33 78 52 61-63 

Mr. Henry Oliva, Project Manager 

SIGEFI 

Vorobiova ul. 17 

214015 Smolensk 

Phone: ++7(081)223 4789 

Fax: ++7(081)226 0693 



ST. PETERSBURG REGIONAL VENTURE FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 



Russia: St. Petersburg and Leningrad Oblast. 

St. Petersburg Regional Venture Fund Management GmbH 

EBRD: $30 million. 

n/a 



Investment Objective: Equity investments in private sector enterprises with no more than 

25% state ownership and up to 5,000 employees. Investment 
targets will not necessarily have a foreign partner or hard currency 
earnings; the fund is expected to focus on enterprises that have a 
strong position in the domestic market. Preferred minimum 
investment of $300,000, preferred maximum $3 million. 

Additional Notes: The Fund may also provide some technical assistance along with 

investment. 



Industries: 
Contact: 



No hard liquor, tobacco or firearms, must have western partner. 

Mr. Wolfgang Engler, Managing Partner 

St. Petersburg Regional Venture Fund Management GmbH 

Hamburger Allee 2- 1 

60486 Frankfurt am Main, Germany 

Phone: ++49 (69) 79 50 00 24 

Fax: ++49 (69) 79 50 00 60 



URALS REGIONAL VENTURE FUND 



Region: 



Russia: Sverdlovsk, Perm and Chelyabinsk Oblasts. 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Jul\ W*> 



8-21 



Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 



Fleming Investments Ltd. 
EBRD: $30 million. 

n/a 



Investment Objective: Equity investments in private sector enterprises with no more than 

25% state ownership and up to 5,000 employees. Investments 
targets will not necessarily have a foreign partner or hard currency 
earnings; the fund is expected to focus on enterprises that have a 
strong position in the domestic market. Preferred minimum 
investment of $300,000, preferred maximum $3 million. 



Industries: 
Contact: 



No hard liquor, tobacco or firearms, must have a western partner. 

Mark V. Jarvis 

Urals Regional Venture Fund 

Fleming Investments Moscow Representative Office 

ul. Pushkinskaya 7/5, kv. 4 

103009 Moscow, Russia 

Ph: ++7(095)247 9049 

Fax: ++7 (095) 247 9049 

George S. Horton 
Fleming Investments Ltd. 
25 Copthall Avenue 
London DC2R 7DT 
Ph: ++44(171)638 5858 
Fax: ++44 (171) 382 5000/60 



U.S. CIVILIAN RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION (CRDF) 

Region: For the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union (FSU) 

Manager: U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) 

Capitalization: 



Funds invested: 



$5 million gift from Mr. George Soros and a $5 million allocation 
from the U.S. Department of Defense's "Nunn-Lugar" program 



n/a 



Investment Objective: To advance defense conversion by funding collaborative R&D 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-22 



July 1996 



Scientific disciplines: 



Contact: 



/commercialization projects between scientists and engineers in the 
U.S. and in the independent states of the FSU. Level of funding 
$10,000 to 80,000 over a two-year period. Average grant $40,000 
($20,000 per year over two years) 

Priority given to FSU engineers and scientists formerly engaged in 
work on weapons of mass destruction. 



Additional notes: No proposal to exceed 20 pages in length. Send 10 copies. 



Civilian Research and Development Foundation 
1800 North Kent Street, Suite 1 106 
Arlington, Virginia 22209 
Phone: 703-526-9720 
Fax: 703-526-9721 
E-mail: information@crdf.org 



U.S. RUSSIA INVESTMENT FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 



Russia. 

The U.S. Russia Investment Fund, Inc. 

U.S. AID grants (total anticipated): $440 m. 

Anticipated $45 million by end of September on 10-12 projects. 



Investment Objective: The Fund will consider investment proposals from enterprises as 

long as they are commercially viable and exhibit the potential for 
growth and profit generation. The business should have a 
committed and progressive management team a coherent business 
plan or thoughtful vision for development. The Fund is chartered 
to offer financing and management assistance to privatized Russian 
enterprises of all sizes. Investments have ranged from $20,000 to 
approximately $1 1 million. 



Industries: 



Additional Notes: 



Diversified. 



This fund was formed through consolidation of the Fund for Large 
Enterprises in Russia and the Russian-American Enterprise 

Fund. TUSIRF also has a small business lending program through 
Russian banks and lending institutions to make small loans to small 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Juh 



8-23 



enterprises. 

Contact: Project Coordinator 

The U.S. Russia Investment Fund 
17 State Street, 33rd Floor 
New York, NY 10004 
Ph: (212)504 0400 
Fax: (212) 668-0700 

Project Coordinator 
The U.S. Russia Investment Fund 
Tsevtnoy Boulevard, 25/3, 5th Floor 
103051, Moscow, Russia 
Satellite Ph: ++7 (501) 929-9888 
Ph: ++7(095)929-9888 
Fax: ++7 (095) 929 9828 

Project Coordinator 
The U.S. Russia Investment Fund 
Amethyst Hotel, 5 A Tolstogo Street 
680000, Khabarovsk, Russia 
Satellite Ph.: ++7 (5090) 160 0088 
Satellite Fax: ++7 (501 0) 1 60-0 1 3 1 
Ph.: ++7(421) 233 7549 

Fax: ++7(421) 233 4699 



THE WESTERN NIS ENTERPRISE FUND 



Region: 

Manager: 

Capitalization: 

Funds Invested: 
Investment Objective: 



Western NIS (Belarus, Moldova, and Ukraine) 

Western NIS Enterprise Fund, Inc. 

U.S. AID: anticipates capitalizing this Fund with $150 
million in foreign assistance appropriations over the next 3- 
4 years. 

n/a 

Equity and debt. The Fund will actively seek corporate and 
financial partners from the U.S., Europe, and elsewhere. 
The Fund's focus will be on small and medium-sized private 
and privatizing firms with as many as 2,500 workers, 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-24 



July 1996 



Industries: 
Additional Notes: 



Contact: 



although it is expected that most loans and investments will 
be aimed at firms that are considerably smaller than this 
threshold. 



n/a 



The fund will offer technical assistance alongside 
investment. Additionally, the fund will be encouraged to 
use its U.S. Government funding to attract other resources 
for private sector development in the three states. 

Scott Carlson, President 
Western NIS Enterprise Fund 
15 W. 39th Street, 11th Floor 
New York, NY 10018 
Phone: (212)556-9320 
Fax: (212) 556-9321 

Natalie A. Jaresko 

Western NIS Enterprise Fund 

4 Muzeney Pereulok 

250001 Kiev, Ukraine 

Phone ++3 80 (044) 291 02 80, 291 02 81, 291 02 82 

Fax: ++380(044)29102 89 



PRIVATE FUNDS 

Privately-managed funds are listed alphabetically and are included here for informational 
purposes only. Inclusion in this list does not constitute U.S. government endorsement of 
any private fund. 



AMERICAN INVESTMENT GROUP OF NAPLES 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 



Russia 

American Investment Group of Naples 

n/a 

n/a 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Jul\ W*> 



8-25 



Investment Objective: 

Industries: 
Contact: 



The Fund makes small early-stage investments in Russian 
projects and in U.S. Russian joint ventures. 

n/a 

Herbert Van Dyke, Chairman 
American Investment Group of Naples 
ul. Kosmonavt Volkova 14 
125299 Moscow, Russia 
Phone: ++7(095) 156 9626 
Fax: ++7(095)156 9670 



BRUNSWICK FUND 

Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Investment Objective: 

Funds Invested: 
Investment Objective: 
Industries: 



Russia 



Brunswick B.C. 



Anticipates raising $40 to $50 million. 

Equity Maintains active management in its holdings. 
$200,000 to $600,000 



n/a 



n/a 



Oil and gas (oil extraction), utilities such as electrical energy 
and telecommunications, mineral extraction and processing, 
and fishing fleets. 



Contact: 



Martin Anderson, Manager 

Brunswick B.C. 

25/3 Tsvetnoy Boulevard 

103051, Moscow, Russia 

Satellite Phone: ++7 (501) 929 98 00 

Local Phone: ++7 (095) 291 6358 

Fax: ++7 (501) 929 98 01 



FIREBIRD FUND 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-26 



July 1996 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 
Investment Objective: 

Industries: 



Russia 

Firebird Advisors, Ldc. 

$40 million. 

$37 million. 

Equity. Fund takes small passive positions in largest, most 
liquid Russian companies. Investments range from 
$500,000 to $2 million. 

Oil, gas, utilities, forest products, metal and mining. 



Contact: 



Andrew Tyson 
Trident Trust Co. 
1 Capital Place 
Cayman Islands 
(809) 949 0880 
(809)949 0881 



FIRST INVESTMENT VOUCHER FUND 

This Fund was purchased by U.S. mutual fund manager Pioneer Group, Inc. in April. 
1995. 



FLEMING INVESTMENT FUND FOR RUSSIA 



Region: 
Manager: 

Capitalization: 

Funds Invested: 

Investment Objective: 

Industries: 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg' 



Russia. 

Fleming Investment Management, Ltd., London Brunswick 
B.C., advisors. 

$57.1 m. closed-end fund. 

n/a 

Equity. 

Oil and gas, telecommunications, utilities, mining. 



Jul\ W*> 



8-27 



automotive. 



Additional Notes: 



Trades on Dublin exchange. 



JUNCTION INVESTORS LTD. 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 
Investment Objective: 

Industries: 
Additional Notes: 

Contact: 



NIS, as well as Eastern Europe and China. 

Junction Investors, Ltd. (JTL) 

$50 million. 

n/a 

Equity and Debt. Preferred investments are small to 
medium-sized businesses with long-term growth potential. 
From $1 million to $5 million. 

Infrastructure-related industry, in particular real estate and 
telecommunication. 

JIL provides management assistance when necessary, as 
well a arranges for additional debt and equity funding if 
needed. 

Thomas R. DiBenedetto, President 
Junction Investors, Ltd. 
84 State Street, 2nd Floor 
Boston, MA 02109 
Ph: (617)248 9600 
Fax:(617)248 9652 



NEW EUROPE EAST INVESTMENT FUND 



Manager: 

Capitalization: 

Funds Invested: 

Investment Objective: 

U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Capital International, Inc. 

$105 million committed, $81 million finalized. 

n/a 

Equity, all private placement. Invests with western 

8-28 



July 1996 



Industries: 
Contact: 



NEWSTAR 

Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 
Investment Objective: 

Industries: 

Contact: 



industrial partners. 

Diversified. 

Koenraad Foulon 
25 Bedford Street 
London WC2E 9HM 
Ph: ++44(171)257 6764 
Fax: ++44 (257) 257 67 67 



NIS. 

Newstar, Inc. 

$20 million. 

n/a 

Equity. Preferred candidates are private, small to mid-size 
manufacturing enterprises that include a western partner. 
Newstar plans to be a long-term player. $2 to $5 million 

Construction and related industries, food processing and 
distribution, warehousing, light manufacturing and 
telecommunications. 

Jeffrey Hammer, Director of Investments 

Newstar 

Vspolni Pereulok, 19/20 

103001, Moscow, Russia 

Ph: ++7-(095)-291-8338 

Fax: ++7-(095)-29 1-2926 

Brad Wegner, Investment Manager 

Newstar 

1 00 1 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW 

Suite 480-North 

Washington, D.C. 20004 

Ph: (202)783 4155 

Fax: (202)628 5986 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



s _2o 



Jul\ W*> 



PIONEER FUND 



Region: 


Russia. 


Capitalization: 


n/a 


Funds Invested: 


n/a 



Investment Objective: 



Industries: 



Additional Notes: 



Contact: 



Pioneer will look into long term projects with export 
potential. 

open for new proposals 

Acquired the First Investment Voucher Fund in April, 1995. 

David Tripple or Tim Frost 
Pioneer Group Inc. 
60 State St. 
Boston, MA 02109 
Ph: (617)742 7825 
Fax:(617)422 4281 



RUSSIA AND THE REPUBLICS EQUITY PARTNERS LP. (RARE) 

Region: NIS, with concentration in Russia. 

Capitalization: n/a 

Funds invested: n/a 



Investment objective: 

Industries: 
Additional Notes: 
Contact; 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Equity in small to mid-sized businesses with both strong 
short-term profit potential and long-term growth potential. 
$1 to $5 million. 

Diversified. 

Seeks active role on board of directors. 

Herbert A. Denton, Partner 

Russia and the Republics Equity Partners LP. 

730 5th Avenue 

New York, NY 10019 



8-30 



July 1996 



Phone: (212)888-3200 
Fax: (212) 888-3203 

Joseph Condon, Chairman 

Russia and the Republics Equity Partners LP. 

Kamergersky Pereulok 5, Moscow, Russia 

Phone: ++7(095)247 9051 

Fax: ++7(095)229 1327 



RUSSIA VALUE FUND, LP. 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested; 
Investment Objective: 

Industries: 
Contact: 



Russia, NIS. 

San Antonio Capital Management 

$48 million 

Approximately $40 million 

Equity and debt. Primarily interested in investments in 
publicly traded shares. 

Oil and gas, power generation and transmission, 
telecommunications, shipping and transportation, 
construction materials, and industry. 

Attention: Marketing Director/Russia Value Fund, LP 

San Antonio Capital 

P. O. Box 690327 

San Antonio, TX 

78269-0327 



TRUST COMPANY OF THE WEST 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested 



Russia 

Trust Company of the West 

$550 million 

n/a: 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



July 1«** 



8-3 1 



Investment Objective: 



Industries: 



Contact: 



Equity and debt. TCW is primarily interested in Russian 
debt (representing 70% of its Russian portfolio to date), 
however, it is also interested in privatizing firms. TCW 
primarily invests along with strategic investors, and views 
Russian investments as long-term. 

50% of investment is now in the telecommunications 
industry. 

Trust Company of the West 
200 Park Avenue, Suite 2200 
New York, NY 10166-0228 
Phone: (212)297-4081 
Fax: (212)297-4079 



TEMPLETON RUSSIA FUND 



Region: 
Manager: 
Capitalization: 
Funds Invested: 
Investment objective: 



Industries: 
Contact: 



Russia 

Templeton Investment Management, Inc. 

$60 million 

n/a 

Equity and debt (debt limited to 20% of total assets). 
Long-term capital appreciation. Templeton is only 
interested in companies either about to go public or that are 
already listed. No start-ups, some interest in joint ventures. 

Diversified 

Bill Pingleton 

International Marketing Associate 

Templeton Worldwide 

700 Central Avenue, 2nd Floor 

St. Petersburg, FL 33701 

Fax: (813)821-7992 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



8-32 



July 1996 



CHAPTER 9 

INFORMATION ON RUSSIAN FEDERATION LAWS 

REGARDING DEFENSE INDUSTRY CONVERSION 

AND PRIVATIZATION 

RUSSIAN FEDERATION LAW ON DEFENSE CONVERSION 

The law on conversion was signed by President Yeltsin in March 1992 and first published openly 
in May of that year. Parts of it are outdated, and it is unclear what weight this law currently 
carries. Nevertheless, it is the most comprehensive Russian legislation related specifically to 
defense conversion published to date. 

The law defines the legal foundations for the activity of defense and associated enterprises, 
associations, and organizations in the conditions of the reduction or cessation of defense orders 
and the associated conversion of their production capacities, scientific and technical potential, and 
manpower resources. 

The law regulates relations between Russian Federation organs of state administration and organs 
of state administration of national-state and administrative-territorial formations, and enterprises, 
associations and organizations during the conversion process, and guarantees protection of the 
interests of all participants in that process under conditions of market relations and the use of 
economic methods of management. 

The law specifies the procedure for resolving legal, economic, and social questions arising during 
the conversion process, and is aimed at ensuring the most effective utilization for civil purposes of 
the production capacities, scientific and technical potential, and manpower resources of the 
enterprises undergoing conversion. 

SECTION 1: GENERAL PROVISIONS 

Article 1. Main Terms and Definitions 

1 . In the present law, conversion of the Defense Industry (Hereinafter Conversion) 
means the partial or complete reorientation from military to civil needs, under the 
procedure specified in this law, of the freed production capabilities, scientific and 
technical potential, and manpower resources of defense associated enterprises, 
associations, and organizations. 

2. An enterprise undergoing conversion is a production or science-and-production 
association or plant, design or research organization, or any other enterprise 

U.S. Department of Commerce .Hilv UNo 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-1 



irrespective of form of ownership which is engaged in scientific and (or) 
production activity for military needs (that is, the production, development, 
research, testing, maintenance, and servicing of arms and military equipment and of 
subassemblies, materials, and specialized technological equipment for them, as well 
as the extraction, processing, reutilization, and storage of specialized types of raw 
and semifinished materials for the production of arms and military equipment used 
by the Armed Forces, security organs, and law enforcement organs of the Russian 
Federation) at which the said activity is being reduced or terminated and where 
measures are consequently being implemented to produce civil output and reutilize 
military-technical facilities. 

Defense Enterprises in respect of which a decision has been adopted to terminate 
their activity or to eliminate them due to the technical and economic inexpediency 
of redesignating them, are also defined as undergoing conversion under the present 
law. 



Article 2. Principles of Conversion 

1 . The reduction or cessation of production activity for military needs at a defense 
enterprise is founded on decisions by Russian Federation organs of state power, 
and also on the de facto reduction of military expenditure for these purposes. 

2. The main principle of work by enterprises undergoing conversion is the use of the 
high-technology capabilities of the defense complex to produce output capable of 
competing on the foreign market. 

3 . The production capacities, scientific and technical potential, and manpower 
resources of defense sectors of industry that are freed during the conversion 
process are enlisted to implement priority state targeted programs for the 
socioeconomic development of the Russian Federation. Here account is taken of 
the requirements of the national economy, the proposals of the enterprises 
groundwork that has been built up at the enterprises undergoing conversion, the 
professional skills of the personnel, and the enterprises' specialization and technical 
equipment. 

4. Enterprises undergoing conversion make provision on a contract basis, out of 
funds allocated for defense needs, for the creation, preservation, and development 
of mobilization capacities in accordance with the targets approved by the Russian 
Federation Government, and also for the preservation of the necessary servicing 
personnel. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-2 









5. Conversion takes place in the context of full observance of all norms laid down by 

Russian Federation legislation for the social protection of the personnel of 
enterprises undergoing conversion. 

SECTION 2: ORGANIZATION, PLANNING, AND FINANCE OF DEFENSE 
INDUSTRY CONVERSION 

Article 3. Planning of the Defense Order and Conversion 

1. Planning of the state defense order for the development, production, and delivery 
of arms and military equipment (hereinafter the Defense Order) is based on the 
military doctrine of the Russian Federation and its basic principles. On the basis of 
the military doctrine of the Russian Federation adopted by the Russian Federation 
Supreme Soviet, the Russian Federation Defense Ministry, with the participation of 
the relevant ministries and departments, enterprises, associations, and 
organizations, draws up long-term programs for the development of arms and 
military equipment and programs for the creation, preservation, and development 
of mobilization capacities. Similar programs are drawn up by security organs and 
law enforcement organs of the Russian Federation. 

In accordance with these programs, long-term contracts are concluded and the 
Defense Order is approved. The said long-term programs are also used in the 
compilation of state conversion programs and are communicated to the interested 
enterprises undergoing conversion for the purposes of planning conversion and 
organizing production. 

2. On the basis of the Russian Federation republic budget, the details of the 
corresponding long-term programs are worked out, existing contracts are 
extended, and competitions are held for the fulfillment of new orders. 

Conversion is reckoned to begin in the year in which the production and 
development of arms and military equipment is actually reduced or ceased at the 
enterprises, or in which the redesignation of uncommissioned capacities begins 

Article 4. Conversion Programs 

1 . The main role in organizing the switch from military to civil production and the 

drawing up of conversion programs belongs to the defense enterprise. 

The basis for drawing up the conversion program at the enterprise consists of 

a) Programs for the development and production of arms and military 

U.S. Department of Commerce July I 1 ** 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-3 



equipment and programs for supporting the activity of security organs and 
law enforcement organs of the Russian Federation; 

b) Programs for the creation, preservation, and development of mobilization 
capacities; and 

c) The order for the development, production, and delivery of output and 
goods for important state needs (including Defense Needs). 

2. The drawing up of state conversion programs and the organization of their 
execution are carried out by the Russian Federation Ministry of Industry. 

3 . Regional conversion programs are drawn up by the organs of executive power of 
national-state and administrative-territorial formations, and also by conversion 
coordination councils or other organs promoting the processes of implementation 
of conversion in a region. 

4. The participation of enterprises undergoing conversion in state and regional 
programs is strictly voluntary and based on the principles of economic interest and 
competitiveness. 

Article 5. Finance and Material and Technical Provision for the Conversion Process 

1 . The procedure for finance and material and technical provision for the defense 
order is defined by means of a contract between the executor of the order and the 
client, concluded in accordance with Russian Federation legislation. 

2. The procedure for finance and material and technical provision for work under 
state conversion programs is established in the said programs. 

3. The material interest of the leader of a state enterprise undergoing conversion in 
improving the economic indicators (including that of maintaining the level of 
employment) is ensured by the terms of the contract concluded in accordance with 
Russian Federation legislation. 

4. With a view to ensuring credit availability and the implementation of state 
conversion programs, a state conversion fund is set up. The sources and 
procedure for financing the said fund are determined by the Russian Federation 
Supreme Soviet in the course of approving the Russian Federation Republic 
budget. 

5. Enterprises undergoing conversion are granted the right to form special centralized 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-4 



funds for the financing of research, experimental, design, and planning work, and 
also for the assimilation of new types of output. The said funds are formed on the 
basis of contributions from profits up to a level of 1 .5 percent of the prime cost of 
the enterprises' commodity output (operations, services), such payments being 
deductible from the taxable base for the calculation of income tax (profit tax) 

Article 6. Aspects of Reorganization and Privatization of Enterprises Undergoing 
Conversion 

1. In the case of the full conversion of enterprises which belong to an association and 
are not legal persons in their own right, or of shops, sections, or other structural 
subdivisions of enterprises, they may be designated as autonomous state 
enterprises with the rights of a legal person. The decision to designate a 
subdivision as an autonomous state enterprise is made on a vote at a general 
meeting of the subdivision's labor collective, by a majority of the total number of 
members of the collective. Designation as an autonomous state enterprise takes 
place in accordance with Russian Federation legislation. 

2. The labor collective of a state enterprise undergoing full conversion may submit an 
application for the privatization of its enterprise, participate, through its 
representatives, in the formulation of the privatization plan, and enjoy, in the 
privatization process, the privileges granted by Russian Federation legislation to 
members of enterprises' labor collectives. 

3. In the case of partial conversion, an enterprise or its structural subdivision is 
privatized in accordance with Russian Federation legislation and the state 
privatization program. 

4. Participation by foreign investors in the privatization of enterprises undergoing 
conversion takes place in accordance with the state privatization program, the 
RSFSR law "On Foreign Investments in the RSFSR," and Russian Federation 
legislation on privatization. 

5. Enterprises or structural subdivisions of enterprises whose purpose relates to 
mobilization and which are not used in current production are not subject to 
privatization. 

SECTION 3: SOCIAL PROTECTION. COMPENSATIONS AND CONCESSIONS FOR 
ENTERPRISES UNDERGOING CONVERSION 

Article 7. Social Protection for Workers at Enterprises Undergoing Conversion 



U.S. Department of Commerce Julv I 1 ** 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-5 



1 . Citizens of the Russian Federation working at enterprises undergoing conversion 
and also those who are freed as a result of conversion are entitled to social 
protection in accordance with the present law and other legislative acts of the 
Russian Federation. 

2. For workers at mining, metallurgical, radiochemical, and specialized assembly 
facilities in the uranium industry who are freed as result of conversion, the period 
for which an unemployment allowance is received may be extended by up to two 
years by decision of the local Soviet of People's Deputies. 

3. Workers freed as a result of conversion who had worked in defense sectors of 
industry for at least 15 years are entitled to the use of sector social facilities and 
sector medical services and to retain their place in the waiting line for housing, and 
are also granted preferential rights to individual housing construction or 
membership of housing construction cooperatives in all regions of the Russian 
Federation. 

4. Cities and settlements where more the 20 percent of the employed population is 
made redundant as a result of conversion may be granted the status of priority 
development territories under article 17 of the RSFSR law "On Employment of the 
Population in the RSFSR." 

5. The dismissal of workers from an enterprise undergoing conversion as a result of 
conversion is an additional condition of dismissal to be compulsorily recorded in 
the worker's labor record as a reason for dismissal. 

6. The requirements set forth in point 5 of the present article also apply to workers 
dismissed in accordance with Article 29 points 5 and 6 and Article 33 point 1 of 
the RSFSR labor law code. 

7. All concessions stipulated for labor collective members by Russian Federation 
Legislation and the State Privatization Program are extended to unemployed 
workers dismissed from an enterprise undergoing conversion under points 5 and 6 
of the present article in the course of privatization of state enterprises. 

Article 8. Compensations and Concessions for Enterprises Undergoing Conversion 

1 . Tax concessions for enterprises implementing conversion are established in 
accordance with Russian Federation Taxation Legislation. 

2. State enterprises undergoing conversion are entitled, with the permission of the 
Russian Federation Government, to the accelerated amortization of a proportion of 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-6 



the fixed production capital, or — in the event of the complete removal of the 
defense order from them and the absence of the possibility of using the said capital 
in the civil sphere — to write off highly specialized equipment without 
amortization. 

3. Where there is a reduction in the order for the production of arms and military 
equipment produced on specialized production lines, in specialized shops, or at 
numerically designated production units, and also in other cases leading objectively 
to an increase in the unit cost of the said output, on renewing the contract the 
client must, at the enterprise's request, revise prices for the output ordered on the 
basis of calculations submitted by the enterprise to ensure the production unit's 
profitability in the new conditions and to maintain the existing level of labor 
remuneration for workers at the said lines, shops, and production units. 

4. In the event of failure to comply with the time scale stipulated in the present law 
for communicating to defense industry enterprises the starting data relating to 
conversion, the losses sustained by these enterprises, including: 

a) Expenditure on the mothballing and maintenance of mobilization capacities, 
social measures, and compensation for increased costs of output resulting 
from a reduction in the production of arms and military equipment; 

b) Sums paid in penalties imposed by suppliers or raw and semifinished 
materials and subassemblies; and 

c) Other losses relating to loss of earnings for groundwork done on 
uncompleted output and the need to write off tools, gear, instruments, and 
equipment that cannot be used for the production of civil output— are 
compensated for by the Russian Federation Government out of Russian 
Federation Republic budget resources, unless other provision is made in 
long-term contracts between enterprise and client. 

5. Provision is made for enterprises undergoing conversion which produce, under 
conversion programs, equipment and machinery for the needs of the agro- 
industrial complex to receive compensation for a proportion of overhead, so as to 
ensure that price levels are no higher than world prices. 

SECTION 4. ENTERPRISES' FOREIGN ECONOMIC ACTIVITY IN CONDITIONS OF 
CONVERSION 

Article 9. Forms of Foreign Economic Activity 



U.S. Department of Commerce July l 1 ** 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-7 



1 . Enterprises undergoing conversion are entitled to carry out foreign economic 
activity autonomously in accordance with Russian Federation Legislation. 

Enterprises are entitled to: 

a) Export raw and semifinished materials and equipment freed in the course of 
conversion — on condition that they cannot be used for the production of 
civil output and taking into account the requirements of article 10 of the 
present law; 

b) Import new equipment and technologies, as well as subassemblies, for the 
production of civil output; 

c) Transfer (exchange and sell), in accordance with the specified procedure, 
technologies, licenses, know-how, and scientific and technical information 
which, prior to the commencement of conversion, were used in the 
development of arms and military equipment; 

d) Participate in conferences, symposiums, exhibitions, and fairs involving the 
demonstration of new materials, equipment, instruments, and publicity 
materials describing technologies which were formerly used in the 
production of arms and military equipment; 

e) Develop, produce, and sell arms and military equipment under licenses 
according to the procedure stipulated by Russian Federation Legislation; 
and 

f) Participate in cooperation with foreign firms in the development, 
production, and sale of military output in accordance with Russian 
Federation legislative acts making provision for the protection of the 
Russian Federation's military-technical interests. 

2. The activity of enterprises with foreign investments is regulated by the RSFSR law 
"On Foreign Investments in the RSFSR" and other Russian Federation legislative 
acts. 



Article 10. Protection of the Russian Federation's Military Economic and 
Scientific and Technical Potential 

1 . To prevent damage to the Russian Federation's military economic and scientific 

and technical potential in the course of foreign economic activity by enterprises 

U.S. Department of Commerce My 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-8 



undergoing conversion, and also to ensure the nonproliferation of weapons of mass 
destruction, enterprises should be guided strictly by restrictions imposed on the 
export (transfer, exchange) of output and technologies that have a civil purpose 
but could be used in the creation of weapons of mass destruction Restrictions on 
the export (Transfer, exchange) of the said types of output and technologies are 
imposed by the Russian Federation Supreme Soviet and the Russian Federation 
Government. 

In their foreign economic activity enterprises undergoing conversion are guided by 
the following provisions: 

a) The export of strategic types of raw and semifinished materials and 
equipment takes place under licenses issued in each specific case in 
accordance with Russian Federation legislation; 

b) The transfer of technologies, licenses, know-how, and scientific and 
technical information for the organization of the production of civil output 
and (or) their use in commercial and scientific and technical links with 
foreign firms are conditional on ensuring the protection of the Russian 
Federation's military-economic interests; the sale to other states of arms 
and military equipment and specialized systems, complexes, functional 
units, and assemblies that are components of arms and military equipment 
and also technologies for their production takes place in accordance with 
the procedure specified by the Russian Federation Government. 



Russian Federation President 

B. Yeltsin 

Moscow, House of Soviets of Russia, 

March 20, 1992 

No. 2551-1 

SUMMARY OF THE RUSSIAN UKASE ON ACCELERATION OF 
PRIVATIZATION OF STATE AND MUNICIPAL ENTERPRISES 



Ukase No. 66, sighed by the President of the Russian Federation, Boris Yeltsin, and effective as 
of January 29, 1992, consists of seven appendixes dealing with regulations and methodologj 
pertaining to privatization of state and municipal enterprises. Listed below are appendix titles and 

summary of the articles as they appear in Ukase No. 66. The titles of the appendixes which do 
not contain articles are indicative of the subject matter they cover thus providing a brief summai) 
of each appendix. The Ukase applies to the Russian and foreign legal entities and citizens 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1^^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-9 



Appendix No. 1 

Temporary Regulations on the Procedure for Submitting, Filling Out, and Accepting for 

Consideration Applications for Privatization of State and Municipal Enterprises in the Russian 

Federation. 

Appendix No. 2 

Temporary Methodological Guidelines for Assessing the Value of Objects of Privatization. 

The articles contained in this appendix pertain to the composition of appraised property of the 
enterprises, determination of the value of the enterprise's property, determination of the initial 
price of the enterprises and the amount of the charter capital of the joint-stock company, and 
documentation of the result of the appraisal of the enterprise's property. 

Appendix No. 3 

Temporary Regulations on the Transformation of State and Municipal Enterprises Into Open 

Joint-Stock Companies. 

Appendix No. 4 

Temporary Regulations on Privatization of State and Municipal Enterprises in the Russian 

Federation by Auction. 

The articles of Appendix No. 4 focus on the preparations for conducting an auction, conditions, 
for buyers' participation in auctions, procedure for conducting auctions, documentation of the 
right to own a privatized enterprise and accounts with participants in the auction, distribution of 
proceeds from the sale of objects of privatization at auction, and invalidity of privatization 
transactions and liability of parties. 

Appendix No. 5 

Temporary Regulations on Privatization of State and Municipal Enterprises in the Russian 

Federation Through Competition. 

The articles in Appendix No. 5 are concerned with the preparation and organization of 
competitions, conditions for participation of buyer in the competition, procedure for consideration 
of offers for buyers, documentation of the rights to own privatized objects and accounts with 
participants in the competition, distribution of proceeds from the sale of the object through 
competition, and invalidity of privatization transactions and responsibility of the parties. 

Appendix No. 6 

Temporary Regulations on the Procedure for the Use in 1992. During Privatization of Money 

From Economic Incentive Funds and Profit of State and Municipal Enterprises. 

Appendix No. 7 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-10 



Temporary Regulations on the Work of Privatization Commission 

Ukase No. 66 "On Acceleration of Privatization of State and Municipal Enterprises" was 
developed on the basis of the RSFSR law "On Privatization of State and Municipal Enterprises in 
RSFSR". 

Both of these laws are available in their entirety from the National Technical Information Service 
("NTIS"). Contact NTIS at (703) 487-4650 and request order number PB92-9671 1 9-ACV for 
Ukase No. 66 and order number PB92-96147-ACV for the law "On Privatization of State and 
Municipal Enterprises". 



U.S. Department of Commerce Jul) 1**> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 

9-11 



CHAPTER 10 - RUSSIAN GOVERNMENT AUTHORITIES IN 

INVOLVED IN 
DEFENSE CONVERSION 

I. INTRODUCTION 

Within the Russian Federation, there are organizations and agencies at every level, from the central 
government to the defense enterprise itself, that are involved in defense conversion. Listed below 
are organizations that have been formed to facilitate business ties with Western firms in the hope of 
accomplishing conversion to commercial production. 

Conversion organizations function as primarily focal points for Western firms interested in joint 
ventures with Russian defense enterprises involved in conversion to commercial product lines. These 
agencies usually aid in conducting feasibility studies and market analyses. Organizations are also 
being formed regionally in order to merge defense plants in specific areas and to assist enterprises in 
related production fields. 

As a result, there is tremendous overlap regarding conversion among government agencies and 
between the central and local governments and at the enterprise level which further adds to the 
complexity of defense conversion. 

II. CENTRAL GOVERNMENT LEVEL 

The organizational charts on the following pages outline a few of the Russian Federation Ministries 
that are known to be involved in defense conversion. The head of each ministry, if known, is listed 

III. QUASI-GOVERNMENTAL/INDEPENDENT AGENCIES 

The following is a brief list of several organizations that are involved in defense conversion: 

A. Institute of USA and Canada Studies (ISCAN) of the Soviet Academy of Sciences: 

This agency has set up the Center for Conversion and Privatization (CCP) which is headed 
by Dr. Gennadiy B. Kotchetkov and meets with Western academic and business officials to 
discuss the major elements and problems of "industrial demilitarization." 

B. Russian Union of Industrialists and Entrepreneurs (RUIE): The RUIE (formerly known 
as the Scientific Industrial Union) was created by the central government and is an 
independent agency which consists of 1500 major enterprises and approximately 40 
associations. The RUIE, headed by Arkadiy Volskiy. seeks to become a focus for business 
ties between Western firms and Soviet defense firms. 

C. Military Industrial Investment Company (VPIK): The VPIK.). was organized b\ a 
combination of government and industry to aid the defense industry in adjusting to the 
transformation to a market economy. Its major goal is to finance complete and partial 
conversion of defense enterprises throughout Russia and promote the development and 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv H^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 _ i 



production of dual-use technologies. Several large defense plants, including major aerospace 
and communications firms, are among its founding members. Its most prominent members 
include the Military Industrial Stock Exchange; Russian Commodity-Raw Material 
Exchange; Moscow Central Stock Exchange; Central Scientific Research Institute of 
Machine Building; Pleshakov Scientific Production Association; Khrunichev Plant; 
Economic News Agency; KAMI Stock Exchange; Military Unit 57275; Impuls Scientific 
Production Association; and the Dzerzhinskiy Military Academy. 

IV. LOCAL/REGIONAL GOVERNMENT LEVEL 

In addition, local governments are developing programs to assist in the conversion of local 
enterprises. In St. Petersburg, a group of city officials, banks, and company managers formed a 
marketing firm called Infocon in order to provide market information on area defense firms. 
Another example is Uralkonversiya, an agency headed by Dr. Yevgeniy V. Kulkin, which assists in 
conversion initiatives for defense enterprises in the Urals region. 

The authorities at this level may prove to be the best group for Western firms to initiate discussions 
with since these leaders have the most at stake in the area of defense conversion, especially in regions 
where enterprises employ a majority of the population. 

V. ENTERPRISE/FIRM LEVEL 

At the company level, managers have set up organizations in order to directly develop joint verntures. 
These associations have been organized in the major cities and defense industrial centers throughout 
the Russian Federation. 



U.S. Department of Commerce My 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 0-2 



Players in Russian Defense Industry and Conversion Decisionmaking 







President 










Presidential Advisor tor 
Military-Technical Cooperation 
















Boris Yeltsin 


Boris KuzyV 






1 










Premier 




Department of Defense 
Industries 






Viktor Chernomyrdin 




Chmn Vateriy Mtohaylov 






















1 










1st Deputy Premier 






Deputy Premier 




Stale Committee 

on Military-Technical 

Policy, Chmn 












Vladimir Kadannikov 


Oleg Davydov 


Chmn Sergey Svechntkov 






|| 


















Deputy Premier 








Chmn. Alexandr Kazakov 
















I 












1 








1 


Minister of 
Defense 




Minister of 
Economics 






Minister of 
Foreign Affairs 




Minister of 

Finance 




Minister of Foreign 
Economic Relation: 




Yevgenniy Yasin 


Andrey Kozyrev 


Vladimir Panskov 


Oleg Davydov 








1 




















1st Deputy 

Procurement, R&D 

& Conversion 




1st Deputy 






Deputy 




1st Deputy 




Andrey Koskoshin 


Yakov Urinson 


Georgiy Mamedov 


Andrey Vavilov 










I 
















Deputy Chairman 
Committee on 
Mil-Tech Policy 




Chief, Defense 

Industry & 

Conversion Division 






Department For 

Export Control & 

Conversion 




Viktor Mironov 


Vladimir Salo 

Dep. Nikolay 

Maksimov 


Sergey Kortunov 




1 












Director Defense 
Conversion Dent 
















Gennadiy Kuzin 




Director, Inter- 
departmental 
Analytical Center 




State Committee for 
Defense Sectors of Industry 












Aleksey Ponamarev 

Dep., Sergey 

Kolpakov 


Chairman, Zinoviy Pak 

Yuri Glybin, 

A Korzh, N. Mokina 




















Aleksey Shulunov 






President, League of Defense 
Industries 





U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St Petersburg 



10-3 



Jul\ I** 



CHAPTER 11 - REGIONAL AND OTHER 
USEFUL INFORMATION 

How to Advertise in Russia 

For BISNIS Assistance 

Call: (202) 482-4655 or 

Fax: (202)482-2293 

Internet: BISNIS@DIGEX.NET 

Room H-7413 

U.S. Department of Commerce 

14th Street and Constitution Ave., N.W. 

Washington, DC 20230 

JOURNALS AND OTHER PUBLICATIONS 

Delovie Lyudi 

A journal on business in the former Soviet Union. Printed in both English and Russian, its 
international distribution includes all of the republics of the former Soviet Union. As of 1991 , it 
had a circulation of over 85,000 in Russia, of which 43 percent was in Moscow and St. 
Petersburg. Its total circulation in the newly independent states is up to 120,000. Delovie Lyudi 
also publishes a special energy supplement, which is sent to 15,000 managers operating in the 
energy sector of the former Soviet Union. 

Contact: 



Laeticia Roderer Tel.: 


(212) 629-4460 


Delovie Lvudi 




330 West 42nd Street 




Suite 2600 




New York, NY 10036 




Mark Talieh 


Tel.: (714)675-2464 


2865 East Coast Highway, Suite 308 


Fax: (714)675-0180 


Corona del Mar, CA 92625 





The New York Times: News in Review (Russian Language Edition) 

This newspaper has a circulation of 120,000. Its target audience includes government and political 
leaders in the former Soviet Union, the business community, the press, and the diplomatic and 
academic communities in Russia and other states of the former USSR. Its principal markets are 
Moscow, St. Petersburg, Kiev (Ukraine), Minsk (Belarus), Alma-Ata (Kazakhstan), and other 
major cities of the foreign Soviet Union. 

Contact: Martine Singer, Publisher Tel.: (212)556-1360 

or Ann M. Blinkhorn, Business Development Manager 

229 West 43d Street 
New York, NY 10036 Tel.: (212) 556-1721 



U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 11-1 



Financial Times 

This Russian-language publication is the result of a joint business agreement between The 
Financial Times (Europe's business newspaper) and Izvestia (a leading Russian newspaper). A 
weekly 8-page newspaper that accompanies the Russian newspaper, Izvestia, it features Russian 
and international business and economic news and is circulated in and around Moscow. The 
paper's Moscow circulation is 300,000, with an additional 4,000 copies being sent to leading 
industrial and government figures throughout the newly independent states. 

Contact: Mary-Ellen Houck 

Vice President, Advertising 
Financial Times 
14 East 60th Street 
New York, NY 10022 
Tel.: (212)752-4500 



We/M 

This newspaper, which has editorial headquarters in Washington, DC and Moscow, publishes 
separate but similar English and Russian language editions that are distributed simultaneously in 
the United States and Russia. The major markets of the Russian edition are Moscow, St. 
Petersburg, and Kiev (Ukraine). The paper has a circulation of up to 300,000 in Russia and the 
other independent states and up to 50,000 in the United States. 

Contact: Maxwell McCrohon, Editor Tel.: (202)467-6931 

Izvestia/Hearst Fax: (202)467-6941 

1350 Connecticut Ave., NW 
Suite 1020 
Washington, DC 20036 

Vostok Rosii 

An avenue for advertising in the Russian Far East. The publication is available in original Russian 
language form throughout the region. Its monthly, English-translated version is marketed by 
Image Marketing of Alaska. Largest circulation in Asian Russia. Focuses on business, social and 
economic trends to the North American audience. 

Contact: Larry Rivers, President 

Image Marketing 
Box 507, Talkeetna, AK 99676 
Tel.: (907)733-2573 
Fax: (907) 733-2471 

(Newspapers Magazines) 

This Russian publication, which lists newspapers and magazines published in Russia and the other 
newly independent states, is designed for use by Russian subscribers. The U.S. exporter who is 
willing to do some detective work, however, could use this publication to identify trade journals in 
various industrial sectors. The exporter would then have to do some research to find phone 
numbers and addresses of those journals in order to request information from them on the 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 1 -2 



possibility of advertising. 

Contact: Marketing service 

Tel: +7-095-195-0351 
+7-095-195-6606 

The Russian Yellow Pages 

A Russian-language publication that presents the American way of life as well as thousands of 
names and addresses for the Russian reader. There is a US edition with a circulation of up to 
20,000 and a Russian edition with a circulation of up to 600,000. Businesses can also contact this 
company to advertise on local television programs in Moscow; with audiences of about 30 million. 
Also has con 



Contact: Context Publishing House, Inc. 

475 Fifth Ave., Suite 511 
New York, NY 10017-6220 



Tel.: (212)213-2126 
Tel.: (212)679-4620 
Fax: (212) 447-7558 



ADVERTISING ORGANIZATIONS 



Joint Stock Company Soyuzreklama 

A full-service advertising organization. It offers advertising services ranging from printed 
advertising in booklets, leaflets, and posters to television commercials. It also offers a wide range 
of outdoor advertising including electronic panels, and billboards at sport sites and on municipal 
transport. 

Contact: Soyuzreklama 

103688, Russia, Moscow, Centre, 
GSP 2, Varvarka Street, 14 



Tel.: +7-095-298-5255 
+7-095-298-5255 



+7-095-298-4670 
+7-095-298-4552 



Fax: 



+7-095-298-3605 



+7-095-298-3287 



or: Russian Resources, Inc. (Partner and representative of Soyuzreklama) 
Eleonora A. Markish, President 
6517 Orono Court 
Springfield, V A 22152 
Tel.: (703)569-6907 
• Fax.: (703)569-2679 



Young and Rubicam-Sovero 

Mike Adams 

1404 Sovincentr 

1 2 Krasnopresnenskaya 

NAB Moscow 12610 RUSSIA 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



11-3 



Jul\ N*> 



Tel: +7 095 7 253 2185 
Fax +7 095 7 253 1348 

BBDO Marketing 

Bruce MacDonald 
Staromonetny Pereulok 3 1 
Moscow 109017 RUSSIA 
Tel: +7 095 231 3906 or 3611 
Fax: +7 095 238 3088 



International Media Representatives, Inc. 

This company produces a variety of publications targeting industrial sectors including 
aerospace/defense, food processing, medical/health, and water /environment. One example is its 
Food Industry Buyers Guide in Russian. 

Contact: Mr. Martin Masiuk, President 

International Media Representative, Inc. 
401 Headquarters Drive, Suite 208 
Millersville, MD 21146 
Tel: (410) 987-2075 
Fax: (410) 987-6437 



RADIO 

Open Radio 

This all news, all the time radio station is based in Moscow and has a 20-hour broadcast day. Its 
75 kilowatt transmitter is the strongest AM radio signal in Moscow. The station re-broadcasts 
foreign programs such as Voice of America, BBC, and Radio Liberty as well as broadcasting its 
own western-style new programs. The station has been in operation since March 1992 and has a 
potential market of 30 million; its primary listeners are the rising intellectual and entrepreneurial 
classes of Russia as well as Western business people. The station hopes to eventually expand its 
network Russia- wide. 

Contact: Nurlan Urazbayev, General Manager 

Russia, Moscow 
Ul. Pyatnitskaya, 25 
Tel: +7-095-233-6587/7224/7640 
Fax: +7-095-233-6973 
Telex: 411137 



TELEVISION 

Chief Broadcastin g Center of Russia 

This broadcasting center is responsible for the transmission of seven television channels to an 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 11-4 



audience of 15 million people in and around Moscow. It handles the transmission of nine radio 
channels to the same audience and maintains the cable television network that serves 1 .7 million 
subscribers in Moscow. 

Contact: Vyacheslav N. Misyulin 

127427, Russia, Moscow 
Ul. Akad. Koroleva, 15 
Tel: +7-095-283-4890 
Fax: +7-095-288-9591 
Telex: 412236 OSTVT 

Sakhalin Regional Broadcasting and Radio Television Center 

Contact: Sergei P. Prokhorenko 

693016, Russia, Yuzhno Sakhalinsk 
Ul. Komsomolskaya, 213A 
Tel: +7-45400-3-8929 
Fax: +7-42400-2-3001 



NOTE: Developments are changing rapidly in the NIS. 



U.S. Department of Commerce Juh 1^^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 1 -5 



CHAPTER 12 - MARKET RESEARCH AND TRANSPORTATION 

SERVICES 



MARKET RESEARCH COMPANIES 



U.S. FOREIGN COMMERCIAL SERVICE 
(American Embassy Commercial Section) 
Novinsky BuPvar, 15 
Moscow 121099 Russia 
Telephone: 255-4848, 255-4660 

252-2451/59 x. 5011,5091 
Telefax: 230-2101 

Satellite Phone (from Europe or U.S.): 7-502-224-1 105 
Satellite Fax: (from Europe or U.S.): 7-502-224-1106 

Commercial Counselor John Peters 

Commercial Attache Eric Weaver 

Commercial Officer Rich Steffens 
Secretary to the Commercial 

Counselor Cathy Criley 

Business Facilitation Mary Beach 

BISNIS representative Irina Zamarina 

Commercial Assistant Alia Karaseva (consumer goods /licensing/hospitality) 

Commercial Assistant Yuri Malkov (telecommunications & ground transportations 

Commercial Assistant Mila Maksimova (financial sevices/textiles/electronics) 

Commercial Assistant Vladimir Maximov (environment and services) 

Commercial Assistant Nikolai Mikhailov (minerals/oil &gas eqpt./ construct, eqpt.) 

Commercial Assistant Victor Polishuk (ships, aircra ft/he avy industry) 

Commercial Assistant Marina Parshukova (medical equipment & computers) 

Commercial Assistant Olga Varfolomeeva 

Commercial Clerk Natalya Zhukova 

Commercial Operations Sasha Soskin (agriculture & wood processing) 

SABIT Coordinator Susan Fischer 

The following list was compiled by the Commercial Section of the American Embassy. We would 
appreciate the learning of any additions or corrections which should be made to this list. 



MARKET RESEARCH COMPANIES 

ACCORD CONSULTING GROUP 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 2- 1 



444 Castro Street, Suite 400 
Mountain View, CA 94041 
Tel: (415)940-1896 
Fax: (415) 969-8660 

AMTRADE ASSOCIATES 

420 Lexington Avenue, Suites 1624-27 

New York, NY 10170 

Tel: (212)697-2467 

Fax: (212)599-0839 

ASET CONSULTANTS. INC . 
8530 Greensboro Drive, Suite 805 
McLean, VA 22102 
Tel: (703) 790-1922 
Fax: (703)883-1305 

DCSS INTERNATIONAL 
P.O. Box 4773 
Spartansburg, SC 29305 
Tel: (803)582-8681 
Fax: (803)582-8683 

D.R.I 

P.O. Box 15 
115573 Moscow 
Tel: 396-0853 
Fax: 292-6511 

258 Harvard Street, Suite 246 
Brookline, MA 02146 
Tel: (617)783-9181 
Fax: (617)783-9181 

DUN & BRADSTREET RUSSIA 
Bumazhni Proezd 14 
101462 Moscow 
Tel: 250-2025 
Fax: 250-4898 

EAST CONSULT LTD. 
Russian Academy of Sciences 
12 Rozhdestvenka Stre. 
103753 Moscow 
Tel: 924-1233 
Fax: 925-8523 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 12-2 






FYI- INFORMATION FOR A CHANGING WORLD 
735 8th Street, SE 
Washington, DC 20003 
Tel: (202)522-2394 
Fax: (202)543-9835 

INFORCOM 
8 Merzliakovski Street 
121614 Moscow 
Tel: 925-6644 
Fax: 925-2679 

KOEPPEN. ELLIOTT & ASSOCIATES. LTD. 
1825 I Street, NW, Suite 400 
Washington, DC 20006 
Tel: (202)429-5245 
Fax: (202)429-9574 

MANAKEY GLOBAL. INC. 
32-9 Parusny Proezd 
123364 Moscow 
Tel: 193-1804,908-8673 
Fax: 908-8673 

MANAGEMENT INTERNATIONAL 

Zholtovskoi 1 8 A, Suite 6 

Moscow 

Tel: 209-0154 

1419 Oak Grove, Suite 301 
Burlingame, CA 94010 
Tel: (415) 375-0944 

MB CONSULTING 

B. Serpukhovskaya 44, Rooms 37, 39, 41 

113093 Moscow 

Tel: 236-4734 

Fax: 200-3937 "For MS Consulting" 

MINSTRY OF FOREIGN ECONOMIC RELATIONS 

NATIONAL MARKET RESEARCH INSTITUTE (VNIKD 

4 Pudovkin Street 

119285 Moscow 

Tel: 143-8664, 147-4366 

Fax: 143-0271 

NOVOSTI-INKOM 

U.S. Department of Commerce July l ^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 2-3 



4 Zubovsky BuTva, Room 5010 
103786 Moscow 
Tel: 201-7193,201-8433 
Fax: 230-2170,230-2667 

RCMI 

Research, Consultation, 

Managment, International 

15 Chekhov Street 

103006 Moscow 

Tel: 195-2853 

Fax: 195-2853 

190000 MacArthur Blvd., Suite 400 
Irvine, CA 92715 
Tel: (714)476-7850 
Fax: (714)540-7108 

RUS IMPLANT 

1 Tverskoi-Yamskoi Per. 18/3, Office 326 

125834 Moscow 

Tel: 251-55369,251-1798,956-1525 

Fax: 251-5447 

RUSSIAN MARKET RESEARCH CENTER 
2112 New Hampshire Avenue, NUW, Suite 817 
Washington, DC 20009 
Tel: (202)462-0954 
Fax: (202)462-0960 

WPW INTERNATIONAL 
1480-F Terrell Mill Road, Suite 816 
Marietta, GA 30067 
Tel: (404)953-2300 
Fax: (404)953-0783 



RUSSIAN TRANSPORT SERVICES 
BONDED WAREHOUSES 

EVRODONAT TERMINALS 

ul. Jakornaja 17 

St. Petersburg, 195027 

Fax: +7-812-227-1191 

Contact: Konstantin V. Fusin, General Director 






U. S. Department of Commerce My 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 2-4 



SOFI 

Volkhonskoje Sh. Ill 

St. Petersburg 

Fax: +7-812-155-3343 

Contact: Leonid M. Kanevsky, Director 

A/O PETERSBURG- VNESHTRANS LTD. 

Mezhevoj kan. 

St. Petersburg 

Fax: +7-812-186-2883 

Contact: Jaov L. Romanenko, Vice President 

COMMERCIAL PORT OF KALININGRAD 

Fax: +7-0112-44-6318 

Contact: Valerij M. Tarasov, Commercial Director 

AEROSHER-EXPRESS 

GOSNII GA, Sheremetyevo-1 

Moscow 103340 

phone: +7-095-578-4754, 578-6367 

Fax: +7-095-578-4651 

Contact: Vladimir Alexandrovich Smirnov, General Director 

Yuri Mikhailovich Baranovskiy, Commercial Director 

EURONET 

ill. 2 Skotoprogonnaya 35/3 
Moscow 109029 

phone: +7-095-278-8521, 278-0029 
Fax: +7-095-278-0029 
Contact: Victor Konstantinovich 
Yaroshevich, Director 

INTERTAMSERVICE 

Kashirskiy Pr. 17 

Moscow 

Phone: +7-095-113-2209 

MOLCOM 

ul. Kostomarovskaya 5 

Klyazma, Pushkino District, Moscow region 

phone: +7-095-227-8535, 581-3355, 297-3434 

Fax: +7-095-200-3279 

Telex: 414731 MLCSU 

Contact: Mikhail Yefimiovich Malkov, General Director 

MOSTERM1NAL-SERVICE 

ul. Krasnobogatyrskaya 79 

U.S. Department of Commerce July l°°o 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 2-5 



Moscow 107258 

phone: +7-095-963-9089 

Fax: +7-095-162-1675 

Contact: Alexander Alexandrovich Galkin, General Director 

ORBITA-LIMOUSINE SERVICE 

43a, ill. Ryabinovaya 

Moscow 121471 

phone: +7-095-310-3183 

Fax: +7-095-310-7089 

Contact: Alexander Alexandrovich Galkin, General director 

SOVINDEP 

Balaklavskiy Pr. 28 (ul. Bolotnikovskay 42/1) 

Moscow 

phone: +7-095-318-0018,121-3498 

fax: +7-095-121-2551 

Contact: Victor Mikhailovich Tyultin, President 

SOVTRANSAVTO-EXPEDITSIYA 

26 km, Varshavskoye Shaussee 

Moscow 113623 

phone: +7-095-548-7675, 548-7498 

Fax: +7-095-548-7161 

Telex: 41130UTEPSU 

Contact: Igor Vasilyevich Dzhegriy, Director 



RAIL SERVICE 

RUSSIAN STATE RAILWAYS 

Far Eastern District 

ul. Muravyeva/Amurskovo 20 

Khabarovsk 680000 

Khabarovski Krai 

phone: 27-22-63 

Contact: A. P. Ivanov 

RUSSIAN STATE RAILWAYS 

Baikal- Amur District 
ul. Krasnaya Presnya 10 
Amur Oblast* 
Tynda 676880 
phone: 9-44-00 
Contact: A.O. Bogdanovich 

RUSSIAN STATE RAILWAYS 






U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 2-6 



Sakhalin District 
Kommunisticheski pr. 78 
693000 Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk 
Sakhalin Oblast* 
phone: 44-00 

RUSSIAN FAR EASTERN SERVICE 

RUSSIAN FEDERATION MINISTRY OF TRANSPORT 

Maritime Department 

ul. Rozhdestvneka 4 

Moscow 

phone: +7-095-926-1348 

PORT OF NAKHODKA 

ul. Portovaya 22 

Primorski Krai 

Nakhodka 692900 

phone: 4-79-68,4-13-86 

Fax: 4-79-86,4-18-06 

tlx: 213824 PIRS SU 

Contact: Gelii Nikolaevich Myasnikov, General Director 

PORT OF KHOLMSK 

ul. Sov'etskaya41 

Sakhalin Oblast 

Kholmsk 694620 

phone: 2-23-61 

tlx: 213214 SFERASU 

Contact: V. Gapon, General Director 

PORT OF KORSAKOV 

per. Reidovi 2 

Sakhalin Oblast 

Korsakov 694000 

phone: 2-32-34 

Contact: Lyubomir Nikolaevich Stooyanov, General Director 

PORTOF MAGADA 

Magadan Oblast 

685004 Magadan 

Phone: 41300-3-50-12 

tlx: 145131 PORT SU 

Contact: Yurii Alcksccvich Mishkov, Director 

PORT OF PETROPAVLOVSK-KAMCHATSKI 

ul. Radiosvyazi 26 

U.S. Department of Commerce Juh W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 2-7 



Kamchatka Oblast 

Petropavlovsk-Kamchatski 683000 

phone: 2-19-03 

Contact: Rafac Batykovic Bashkirov, General Director 

PORT OF POS* YOT 

ul. Portovaya 47 

Pfimorski Krai 

Pos'yot 692761 

phone: 2-13-21 

General Director: V. Raspopin 

PORT OF VANINO 

ul. Zheleznodorogaya 1 

Khabarovski Krai 

682860 Vanino 

phone: 42137-5-75-05,5-13-23 

fax: 42137-5-14-82 

telex: 141156PIRSSU 

Contact: Apollon Mikhailovich Shangeliya, General Director 

PORT OF VLADIVOSTOK 

ul. Strelnikova 9 

Primorski Krai, 

Vladivostok 690600 

phone: 4232-22-23-64 

telex: 213855 PORT SU 

Contact: Mikhail Fedorovich Robkanov, General Director 

PORT OF VOSTOCHN1 

Primorski Krai 

Wrangel 692907 

phone 5-23-71 

tlx: 2123821 SVTV SU 

Contact: Boris Matveevich Kolovejchik, Manager 

PORT OF TIKSI 

ul. Morskaya 1 

Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) 

Tiksi 678400 

phone: 41167-2-10-45 

Contact: Gennadii Georgievich Drugov, Director 



PACIFIC BASED AIR AND SEA CARGO SERVICES 

REEVE 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 12-8 



Anchorage, AK 

phone: 907-243-4700 

Contact: Keith Campbell, Vice President Flight Operations 

BERING AIR 

Nome, AK 

phone: 907-478-5620 

Contact: Theresa Horvath, Russian Booking Agent 

LYNDEN TRANSPORT 

Anchorage, AK 
phone: 907-243-6150 
Contact: RickPolluck 

BAKER AVIATION 

Fairbanks, AK 
phone: 907-442-3700 
Contact: Marcy Baker 

ALASKA CARGO TRANSPORT 

Seattle, WA 
phone: 206-762-5955 
fax: 206-762-5955 
Contact: Rusty Devereaux 

PENINSULA AIR 

Anchorage, AK 

phone: 907-243-2485 

Contact: Dick Harding, Director of Operations 

NORTHERN AIR CARGO 

Anchorage, AK 
phone: 907-243-3545 
Contact: Mary Shoulton 

ALASKA AIRLINES 

Seattle, WA 

phone: 206-431-7195 

Contact: Ron Peck 

AEROFLOT 

phone: 907-248-8400 
Contact: Roger Kegley or 
Airline Management Company 
phone: 907-272-9299 

MARK AIR 

U.S. Department of Commerce Jul\ loo^, 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 2-9 



phone: 907-266-3609 
Contact: Craig Johnson 

FAR EASTERN SHIPPING COMPANY, INC. 

(Darnevostochnoye morskkoye parochodstvo, AO) 

ul. Aleytskaya 15 (formerly ul. 25 Oktyabrya) 

690019 Vladivostok 

Primorski Krai 

phone: 4232-22-24-32 

fax: 4232-22-46-36 

telex: 215113 ABC 

Contact: Viktor Mikhailovich Mis 'kov, Director 



COASTAL SHIPPING COMPANY, INC. 

(Primorskoye morskoye parochodstvo, AO) 

ul. Pogranichnaya 6 

692900 Nakhodka 

Primorski Krai 

phone: 42366-5-60-90 

fax: (42366) 5-60-78 

tlx: (42366) PSHP SU 

Contact: Aleksandr Dimitrievich Kirilichev, General Director 

SEALAND SERVICE INTERNATIONAL, TD. 

Vostochni-Port 

Wrangel-1 692900 

satellite phone/fax: 7-504-9 15-22 10 

local phone: 52-43-7, 52-09-4 

AMERICAN PRESIDENT LINES 

3443 West Marginal Way, S.W. 

Seattle, WA 98106 

phone: 206-933-4646 

fax: 206-933-4612 

Contact: John Edgar, Senior Account Executive: 

SILVER WIND CORPORATION 

(Agents for American President Lines) 

ul. Menzhinskovo 63 

Vladivostok 690600 

phone: 26-74-39 

fax: 22-23-64 

Contact: Vladimir T. Zhenikhalov, President 

SUNMAR SHIPPING, INC. 

2615 Fourth Ave. 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 12-10 



Seattle, WA 98121 
phone: 206-443-0200 
Fax: 206-443-0207 
telex: 7403301 SPS UC 
Contact: Stephen A. Hansen 

MERIT STEAMSHIP AGENCY, INC. 

(Agents for Navix) 

1111 Third Avenue, Suite 2140 

Seattle, WA 98101 

phone: 206-682-2671 

fax: 206-682-6023 

telex: 185119 

Contact: Michael Smith 

PORT OF ANCHORAGE 

phone: 907-272-1531 
Contact: Bill Blessington 
Port of Anchorage 



INSURANCE COMPANIES/SECURITY FIRMS 



Corporate Risk International 
1 1250 Waples Mill Rd. 
Fairfax, VA 22031 
Phone: 703-359-3901 
Sean M. McWeeney, President 

The company operates a Professional Indemnity Agency for Lloyds of London. This company can 
provide an assesment of the financial background of proposed overseas partners, prepare travel risk 
reports, conduct negotiations in difficult situations and provide overseas bodyguards. The company 
has over 100 agents stationed overseas. 

Johnson & Higgins 
New York 

Provides start-up companies in Russia with property, liability, motor and expatriate personal 
contents coverage. A new product called "RUSPAC" is underwritten by Russian American Insurance 
Co., a joint venture insurance company with Stolichny Bank of Moscow. American International 
Group Inc. , and Rossiya insurance Company of Russia. 

The company also offers a cargo insurance program known as "RUSFLEX". 



U.S. Department of Commerce July l°°o 

RDRD 5 - St. Petersburg 12-11 



The Parvus Group 

8403 Colesville Road, Suite 610 

Silver Spring, MD 20910 

Eric Bassett, Manager Business Development 

Phone: 301-589-4949 

Fax: 301-589-0007 

Parvus operates in 14 cities in Central Eurasia in a joint- venture known as ZAO PARVUS- 
DHERIKO. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 12-12 



CHAPTER 13 - THE COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL REAL 
ESTATE MARKET IN ST. PETERSBURG 

I. INTRODUCTION 

One of the primary concerns of Americans considering doing business in St. 
Petersburg is the availability and process of acquiring property for office space, housing 
and commercial development. The real estate industry in St. Petersburg is an immature 
one, riddled with problems such as a lack of zoning laws, unstable regulations and laws 
pertaining to ownership and leasehold rights, and the arbitrary appraisal of property. 
Although the present national constitution does not allow for the direct purchase of land, 
it is possible for Westerners to acquire quasi-enforceable property rights in St. Petersburg 
The purpose of this report is to identify these difficulties, but also provide an overview of 
several current methods of acquiring property, including lease or purchase of privatized 
property, conversion of communal flats, and the lease or purchase of municipal property. 
In light of the constant changes taking place in the real estate market, the statistics and 
pricing information set forth below may also change dramatically. 

II. PRESENT AVAILABILITY OF RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY 

A. Western Style Housing 

Western style housing is in high demand and short supply in St. Petersburg. Single 
family homes are non-existent in the city and Western style apartments available for 
immediate occupancy are scarce. Western style apartments are those which have 
undergone significant renovation. Usually, they include a remodeled kitchen and 
bathroom, modern appliances, and contemporary decor. In addition, the apartments may 
include a washer and dryer, water heater, space heater, and water filtration system. A 
Western style apartment located in the historic center of the city with three to five rooms, 
rents for $800-$ 1500 per month. Competition is great for these few high quality 
apartments, and vacated units are soon rented. Several firms plan to construct or renovate 
Western standard apartment complexes, but few are presently completed. 

B. Russian Privatized Apartments 

An alternative to leasing Westernized housing is to rent Russian privatized 
apartments. Unfortunately, renting a Russian apartment "as is" will subject the renter to 
conditions that would not be tolerated by most Americans. The heat and water are 
centrally controlled by the city, with little regard to the comfort of the populace. The hot 
water is turned off by city authorities for 2-6 weeks in the summer while the 'pipes arc 
cleaned' and in the winter, the city's distribution of heat does not always correspond to 
the need. Thus, the purchase of a water heater and space heater are recommended In 
addition, the water supply in St. Petersburg is contaminated by thsgiardia lambtia 

U.S. Department oi' Commerce .hilv |OOf, 

RDBD 5 - St Petersburg- 13-1 



bacteria. As drinking tap water can cause sickness, a water purification system is a must. 

When considering renting an apartment "as is" prospective renters must also 
consider the cost of remodeling. Most apartments built in the past decades were poorly 
constructed and have suffered from neglect, and may be in need of significant repair. 
Completing these renovations is a challenge because most building materials must be 
imported and finding workers skilled in constructing to Western standards in Russia is 
difficult. 

Although Russian-style apartments have significant drawbacks, they are plentiful in 
St. Petersburg. Thousands of apartments in various physical condition are available 
throughout the city. They rent for as little as $50 per month in the outskirts of the city 
and $150 in the city center. These apartments are advertised in newspapers or may be 
rented through one of the Russian or American real estate agencies in the city. Also, new 
apartment buildings are being constructed by private Russian developers. Prospective 
renters must weigh the advantages of Western amenities versus the bargain prices of 
Russian apartments. 

Before a Russian apartment may be legally rented, it must be privatized and 
registered with the city officials. Residents of state-owned apartments have the right only 
to live in them, not to sell or lease them. Thus, the rental of a non-privatized apartment 
constitutes an illegal sublease, and may result in the removal of the tenant by city 
authorities regardless of the lease or rental documentation. Some people choose to take 
this risk and rent non-privatized apartments, but they should be aware that they have no 
legal recourse if they are removed from the apartment. It is essential to verify 
privatization documents for ownership prior to renting a Russian apartment 

Privatized Russian apartments may also be purchased. The average cost of a one 
room apartment in the outer regions of the city is $10,000-$14,000, a two room apartment 
averages $16,000-$22,000, and a three room apartment costs between $22,000-$30,000. 
Prices for apartments in the center of the city are at least double these figures. The price 
of an apartment depends considerably on the location and the physical condition of the 
apartment. The most desirable apartments to purchase are cooperative apartments. 
Cooperatives are apartment buildings constructed by a group of individuals or an 
enterprise through private investment. They are owned by the entity that built them and 
not by the state. Often, they are maintained better than their state-owned counterparts. 
Unfortunately, cooperatives constitute a very small percentage of available apartments. 

C. General Housing Concerns 

When considering both Russian and Westernized apartments, safety features are a 
primary factor. As economic conditions worsen for Russians, with inflation at 2000% in 
1992 and the average Russian monthly salary the equivalent of $30, crime against 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St Petersburg 1 3 -2 



Westerners is growing at a disturbing rate. Although the incidence of violent crime is 
much lower in St. Petersburg than in large American cities, foreigners are prime targets for 
crimes such as theft. In an apartment, a steel door is a necessity and an alarm system is 
highly recommended. One should also consider an apartment building with a security 
guard. Another concern is security of Western automobiles, which are attractive targets 
for vandalism and theft. Some apartment buildings have guarded parking lots , but this is 
the exception and not the rule. Garage space is virtually non-existent in the city, therefore 
parking is almost entirely limited to the street or in courtyards. It is possible to arrange 
parking at one of the few Western hotels, but this may be an expensive and inconvenient 
solution. 



III. PRESENT AVAILABILITY OF OFFICE SPACE AND COMMERCIAL 
PROPERTY 

As in the housing market, minimal Western style office space is available for 
immediate use. Several modest development projects are presently underway to fill this 
need. The price of office space varies greatly, from $250-800 per square meter per year, 
depending on location. Naturally, offices of Nevsky Prospect in the center of the city are 
the most expensive and in greatest demand. Inexpensive Russian style office space is 
available outside the center of the city. While the rent is much lower at only $50-$200 per 
square meter per year, one must consider the cost of renovation, security and the 
establishment of a reliable telecommunications system. 

To help meet the existing need for office space, one real estate developer is 
building interim office units, using modular, prefabricated units imported from Sweden. 
Several firms are in the process of renovating privatized Russian apartment buildings or 
constructing new office buildings, discussed below. Unable to find suitable offices, some 
Western firms are forced to use hotel rooms as offices, with rates starting at $180 per 
night. 

When evaluating office space, there are several important considerations. First, as 
with housing, security is a primary concern. Office buildings should have twenty-four 
hour security in the building and a watch person in the parking lot. Western offices 
containing computers, phones, fax machine, and other office equipment are naturally prime 
targets for theft. Another factor to consider is the quality of telecommunications 
Because of the low quality of the St. Petersburg phone system, an international satellite 
phone line is essential. When considering opening an office in St. Petersburg, regardless 
of the method you engage as described below, it is not uncommon for the process to take 
six to twelve months from the time you locate an office until the time it is suitable for 
occupation. 



U.S. Department of Commerce Jul\ W**> 

RDBD 5 - St Petersburg 1 3 - 3 



IV. PRIVATIZATION OF MUNICIPAL PROPERTY 

Until recently, almost all land and property was owned and controlled by the city. 
The process in underway to convert municipal property to private ownership. Nearly 25% 
of St. Petersburg property is currently privately owned, a significant increase from only 
2% in mid- 1991. In 1992, 56,000 flats were privatized in St. Petersburg, and in the period 
from January-March 1993, nearly 49,500 flats were privatized. The average size of a 
privatized flat is 52. 1 square meters. The majority of privatized flats are in the central 
Nevsky district. Some property experts estimate that 15% of privatized property 
throughout the historic center has been acquired by foreign business persons. 

V. CONVERSION OF COMMUNAL FLATS FOR RESIDENTIAL AND 
COMMERCIAL USE 

A. General Considerations 

Given the shortage of Western style housing and offices in St. Petersburg, it is 
often necessary for foreigners to create their own space, by purchasing a privatized 
communal apartment and renovating it to suit their needs. Most of the apartments in the 
historic center of St. Petersburg are communal flats. These are apartments in which 
between three and ten families have discrete living quarters, but share a kitchen and 
bathroom. The process of privatizing, purchasing, and renovating a communal flat is time 
consuming, often taking between three and five months to complete. However , both 
American and Russian real estate agents acknowledge that this method is the safest and 
most legal means of obtaining property. One agent estimated that 90% of office space and 
virtually all residential space is procured by this method. Because of the complexity of the 
process it is recommended that one work with a real estate firm with experience in this 
process. 

Real estate agencies either arrange for the privatization of communal flats and then 
find clients to purchase the space, or allow the clients to choose the desired site and then 
identify possible apartments for conversion. When a client chooses a particular location, 
the real estate agent approaches communal tenants in the area, and inquires of their 
interest in privatizing their apartments, selling, and relocating. The real estate firm finds 
new apartments for the communal tenants and arranges their relocation. The tenants 
legally privatize their apartments, a process which usually takes one month to complete. 
In many cases the Western client pays for the bureaucratic costs of privatization. When the 
tenants have privatization documents, they are in the legal position to sell their property, 
at which time the Western client can purchase the property and take title. 

B. Ownership and Leasehold Rights and Obligations 

Through the above method, a Western client may purchase a flat, floor of a 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St Petersburg 1 3 -4 



building, or all of the flats within a building. However, the purchase of the property does 
not constitute the purchase of the land under the building. Instead, the buyer signs a lease 
on the land. Typically, purchase of part of a building includes the signing of a 1 5 year 
lease, while purchase of all the flats in a building includes a 49 year lease. This guideline 
does not always hold true, and some real estate agents claim that the length of the lease is 
rather arbitrarily determined. Regardless of the length of the lease, most leases are 
extendable. If all the flats in a building are purchased by a single investor, the lease may 
include a right to purchase the land in the future. Although a legal procedure for such a 
purchase presently does not exist, it is the hope that within the term of the lease, a 
procedure will be devised. Potential buyers are taking a risk, however, because the future 
price of the land is unpredictable. Potential purchasers can only assume that if the price 
for the land is prohibitively high, they can simply extend their lease. 

Currently, the buyer of all of part of a building pays rent on the land in the form of 
a real estate tax. The present annual rate is 3% of the cost of the property as it is stated 
on the purchase contract in rubles. If this amount is less than the monthly Russian 
minimum wage (approximately 7000 rubles in mid- 1993) the owner pays the among of the 
minimum wage. Although the real estate tax rate is the same for both Russian and foreign 
owners, the rate is 3% if the property is owned by an individual and 6% if owned by a 
firm. 

In addition to the real estate tax, the owner must pay the city for gas, electric, 
sewage and water Each flat is metered and billed separately. Even if an investor 
purchases more than one communal flat in a building, the taxes and municipal services are 
billed for each flat individually. Currently, municipal services are heavily subsidized and 
the charges are artificially low. There is no way to predict future increases as more 
properties are privatized and fall into the hands of Western investors. In addition, 
property taxes are presently unrealistically low, with the revenue scarcely compensating 
for collection costs. The tax is based on an antiquated valuation system, rather than 
market value. With the fast paced changes in the real estate market, it is unpredictable 
when the city will change its taxation system and tap into this source of revenue. 

The privatization and sale of a communal apartment does not include the 
stairways, entryway, and other communal areas. This fact poses legal and practical 
problems. Many Western developers are reluctant to invest in the purchase and 
renovation of a building without having legal title to the common areas of the building 
On a practical level, the responsibility for the maintenance of the common areas is unclear 
The city legislature is developing a condominium law to help alleviate these problems, but 
until a law is enacted, Western owners must devise their own solution to the problem of 
common areas. In many case, if the entire building is occupied by foreigners, they will 
make an agreement to share in the maintenance of these areas, similar to a condominium 
association. If a resident is the only Westerner in a building, she may find herself 
maintaining these areas by default. 

U.S. Department of Commerce Juh W^ 

RDBD 5 - St Petersburg 13-5 



C. Other considerations 

The architectural records of a building should be reviewed before considering the 
purchase of a flat or a building. The city has a registry of all historic buildings, including 
information such as bomb damage during the war and the history of capital renovations. If 
the building is deemed to be of historic, artistic, scientific or other value privatization must 
be agreed upon by the State Department for the Preservation of Historic Buildings. An 
integral part of the privatization contract is a preservation commitment made by the owner 
regarding the use of the building. 

There are no zoning laws which prohibit the use of privatized communal flats for 
commercial purposes such as an office, art gallery, or store. A license is required, 
however to convert the flat into a business that will serve food or alcohol. 

In general, privatization and purchase of communal flats is a safe and legal method 
of obtaining property. The conversion takes three to five months to complete, but it is 
usually a relatively smooth procedure. The primary challenge in this process is dealing 
with the individuals in the communal apartments. While most people are eager to relocate 
to other parts of the city in order to acquire a single-family apartment, it can be difficult to 
deal with the unique concerns of each family. If 9 of 1 families agree to privatize their 
apartments, and the last tenant changes his mind, the entire apartment can not be 
privatized. It can take significant maneuvering to find new apartments for the tenants and 
coordinate their relocation. One European firm solved this problem by constructing an 
apartment building in an outer region of the city and relocating the communal tenants 
there. Remodeling the flat is also time consuming. Depending on the physical condition 
of the flat and the desired specifications of the new owner, renovations can take several 
months. 

VI. ACQUISITION OF MUNICIPAL PROPERTY 

A. Lease of Municipal Property 

Most property in St. Petersburg that has not been privatized is municipally-owned. 
Foreign firms and individuals can lease this municipal property. The leases are granted 
either by direct contract or through a competitive bidding process. Auctions and 
concourses are the methods of competitive bidding for commercial property. Auctions 
place no conditions on the lease of the property, and the right to lease the property is 
granted to the highest bidder. The auctions may use either open or sealed bids. In a 
concourse, the lease is also granted to the highest bidder, but this competition differs from 
auctions in that there are conditions placed on the lease of the property. For example, if 
the enterprise is a store of factory, the lessee may be required to maintain the business and 
keep the present employees for a determined amount of time. Also, participation in 
bidding may be limited to employees of the enterprise and to people living in the 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St Petersburg 1 3 -6 



surrounding area. 

Investment tenders are used for the lease of non-commercial municipal property, 
including assets of bankrupt or liquidated companies, temporarily closed buildings, and 
vacant buildings in need of repair. This type of lease includes an obligation by the buyer to 
undertake a previously defined sale, the lessee is required to complete renovations or 
undertake significant capital improvement. In some cases the building must be repaired or 
rebuilt to exact specifications. The property is not necessarily granted to the highest 
bidder, because the choice of the winner is based not only on the amount of the bid, but 
also a determination by the Investment Tender Commission that the bidder will fulfill the 
investment conditions of the competition. 

Investment tenders are either open or closed. Open investment tenders are 
accessible to all potential investors, including foreign individuals and firms. These open 
tenders may include a pre-qualification stage, in which the potential investors must 
complete a questionnaire about their business activities, financial status, and practical 
experience. The applicants are screened, and those selected then submit their tender 
documents. Closed investment tenders do not contain this particular pre-qualification 
procedure, but investors are invited to participate only after agreeing on certain conditions 
as defined by the Investment Tender Committee. 

In these competitive bidding processes, the current occupants are often given 
special benefits, such as a 30 percent discount off the bid price or a longer term to pay for 
the property. A foreign investor can take advantage of these benefits by forming a joint 
stock company with the Russian enterprise occupying the site. 

Although most leases on municipal property are granted by competitive bidding, 
some are granted through direct contact. These leases may include conditions on the use 
of the property or requirements that the lessee contribute money for the improvement of 
infrastructure, including electric, water, and sewage systems. 

If the property to be leased is smaller than 300 square meters, the District 
Commission for Determining the Form of Renting Commercial Buildings in the region in 
which the property is located decides by which method the lease will be granted This 
Commission is comprised of representatives from the Committee on the Administration of 
City Property (Russian abbreviation KUGI), the City Architectural Committee, the 
Economic Development Committee and others. Approval to grant a direct lease of the 
property, and the definition of the terms of the lease are made by the Chief of 
Administration of the District Commission. If the lease is granted by a competitive bid. 
the City Property Fund manages the competition. 

If the property to be leased is larger than 300 square meters, the City Commission 
for Determining the Form of Renting Commercial Buildings decides the method of 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv l*wo 

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granting the lease. A decision to grant a lease through direct contract must be approved 
by the Chief of KUGI, who also sets the terms of the lease. If the lease is granted by 
competitive bidding, the competition is handled by the City Property Fund. 

B. Purchase of Municipal Property 

All enterprises in St. Petersburg were state-owned. Most of these enterprises are 
in the process of being converted to private ownership. KUGI determines which 
properties will be sold, as well as the conditions of the sale, and the competitive bidding 
method. The sale is in the form of an auction, concourse, or investment tender, as 
described above. There are no legal restrictions to foreign investors participating in these 
competitive bidding procedures. The purchase of an enterprise is not simply the purchase 
of the physical plant, but the purchase of the entire enterprise. Conditions are necessarily 
placed on the sale. For example, if a small factory is purchased, the staff and production 
must be maintained for two years. KUGI also sells, by competitive bidding, assets of 
liquidated of companies and vacant buildings. 

Large enterprises are often privatized through the issuance of stock. A portion of 
the stock is given or sold to the employees of the enterprise and the remainder of the stock 
is sold at auction. Foreigners can participate in the auctions, but must be aware that the 
enterprise must be maintained. Several categories of state-owned property can not be 
privatized, including defense related enterprises, natural resources, infrastructure facilities, 
and property of historical or cultural value. 

The purchase of privatized property does not constitute the purchase of the land 
under the building. The purchaser of the enterprise signs a lease on the land and pays rent 
to the city. If part of a building is purchased, a 1 5 year lease is signed and if an entire 
building is purchased, a 49 year lease is signed. In theory, purchase of an entire building 
allows for purchase of the land; however, the legal procedures for such a sale are not yet 
defined. Under current plans, these procedures should be enacted by October, 1993. 

C. General Concerns Relating to Property Acquisition 

Many potential American investors are discouraged by the conditions placed on 
the lease or purchase of municipally-controlled property, by both competitive bidding and 
direct contract. This highlights a basic difference in mentality between the Russian 
officials and foreign investors. Russian officials believe that there are a multitude of 
foreign investors who are so eager to enter the Russian market, that they will agree to 
many conditions placed by the city on the sale of property. The officials also are 
concerned that with the current weak ruble, large tracts of valuable property will be 
bought inexpensively by foreigners, if property sales are not carefully controlled. 
American property developers, on the contrary, are frequently deterred by complicated 
procedures and murky legal conditions for property acquisition. Large scale investors are 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

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reluctant to take the risks in this immature and uncertain market. Large American 
companies, who are accustomed to receiving incentives to build a factory or set up 
operations in a foreign city are surprised and discouraged by the complicated procedures 
established by the city government. 

D. Municipal Property Authorities — Key Contacts 

Committee on the Administration of City Property (KUGI) 
Chairperson: Sergei Georgiyevich Beliayev 
Address: Smolny 
Tel: (812)278-1557 

City Property Fund 

Chairperson: Edward Grigoryevich Boure 

Address: 5 Grivtsova Ulitsa 

Tel: (812)310-4645 

Fax: (812)319-9426 

City Architectural and Building Committee 
Chairperson: Oleg Andreyevich Kharchenko 
Address: 2 Lomonosov Square 
Tel: (812) 315-5216 
Fax: (812) 110-4825 

VII. REAL ESTATE FIRMS AND DEVELOPMENT COMPANIES OPERATING IN 
ST. PETERSBURG 

(The following list is for readers' information and does not constitute an endorsement of 
individual firms.) 

Atlantic Investment 

Address: 18 Ryleyeva Street Apt. 12, St. Petersburg 193023 
Tel: (812)275-8590 
Fax: (812)275-8590 
Contact: Susan Kersh 

Atlantic Investment, an American owned real estate firm acts as a broker for rental 
of Westernized residential and office space. The majority of its business is completing 
specialized real estate searches for Western clients and the privatization and conversion of 
communal apartments. This firm has a registry of 300 buildings in the historic center of 
the city and matches clients' specific needs. 



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BusinessLink 

Address: 8 Marata St. Petersburg., St. Petersburg 

Tel: (812) 112-1513,218-6900 

Fax: (812)315-4951 

Contact: Stanislav Yeremeyev, General Director 

BusinessLink, a Russian owned firm provides consultancy, human resources, and 
public relations services in addition to their investment project management services. The 
latter service handles large development projects, from the identification and analysis of 
sites, to aid in finding local architects and contractor to complete the construction. 
BusinessLink also facilitates the expedition of official agreements and licenses with city 
officials. 

DINAT'F 

Address: 72 Ligovsky Prospect Apt 12 St. Petersburg 
Tel: (812) 112-0765 
Fax: (812) 112-0765 
Contact: Dmitry Schiotin 

DINAT'F, a Russian real estate agency acts as a broker for apartments and office 
space. A majority of their business is in renting privatized apartments in the center of the 

city. 

Dom Plus 

Address: 3 Griboedova Canal St. Petersburg 191186 
Tel: (812)312-1132,210-7607 
Fax: (812)312-8351 
Contact: Andrei Ivanov 

Russian owned real estate agency Dom Plus has apartments and offices available 
for rent throughout the city. The firm also plans to reconstruct two buildings in the center 
of the city for offices, retail stores, and high class apartments. 

Skanska 

Address: 6 Admiralteijskij Prospect, 191065 St. Petersburg 

Tel: (812) 312-8169 

Fax: (8 12) 312-8610 

Contact: Ludmilla Bakayutova, Helena Raiala, managers 

Haka is the largest full service construction company in Finland. In St. Petersburg, 
they completely renovate and convert buildings in the historic center of the city into 
apartments and office space. The buildings are completed to Western standards and 
include security systems. The price to purchase this space starts at approximately $1500 
per square meter. 

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Inform Futur 

Address: 12 Tambovskaya Street, St. Petersburg 192007 
Tel: (812) 166-8543 
Fax: (812) 315-1701 
Contact: Elena Nikulecheva 

A German-Russian project, Inform Futur reconstructs buildings and provides 
Western-style office space. One building is completed and fully rented, and two more 
buildings will be available for occupancy in May, 1 994. This firm rents only to foreign 
clients. The rent averages $600 per square meter per year, and both short and long term 
leases are available. The offices are located in the Frunzenskiy region, not in the prime 
downtown location. 

InterOccidental 

Address: 49 Vosstania Street St. Petersburg 
Tel: (812) 273-4323, 273-5406, 272-1857 
Fax: (812)272-8031 
Contact: Dan Corcoran, President 

InterOccidental, a California company is the largest real estate firm in St. 
Petersburg. It is a full service agency providing appraisal, marketing, and advertising. In 
addition, the firm offers escrow services, which coordinate through Western banks the 
transfer of payment, and delivery of seller's proceeds and lease payments throughout the 
world. A primary activity of the firm is the conversion and sale of communal apartments. 

Lek Estate 

Address: 90/92 Nevsky Prospect 

Tel: (812)272-1097, 275-6675 

Fax: (812)275-2880 

Contact: Alexander Pakhomov, Vice manager 

Lek Estate is a Russian real estate trading company which rents and sells 
apartments and offices throughout the city. They are also involved in the construction of 
apartment buildings in the outer regions of the city and in the conversion of communal 
apartments in the historic center. 

Management Systems, Corporation 

Address: Box 76, Pushkin 7 St. Petersburg 189620 
Tel: (812)476-1550 
Fax: (812) 312-2555 
Contact: Mr. V. Bolshich 

Management Systems Corporation is a Russian firm which handles the lease and 

U.S. Department of Commerce .'ulv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St Petersburg 13-11 



sale of apartments and offices throughout the city. Their capital construction projects 
include the building of warehouses, factories and cottages. 

Neva-Kompekt 

Address: 92 Fontanka Embankment Building 2 
Tel: (812) 312-6325,113-2548 
Fax: (812)312-2555 
Contact: Oleg Kulebakin 

Neva-Komplekt is a Russian real estate firm which brokers the lease of residential 
and office space. They also offer market analysis, site selection services for industrial 
development projects. 

Pukkila-Talot Company 

Address: 60 Sverdlovskaya Embankment Apt. 47 St. Petersburg 
Tel: (812) 224-6178,230-0725 
Contact: Jussi Urpola 

Pukkila-Talot Company is a Finnish firm involved in the reconstruction of historic 
buildings in the city center. The buildings, are renovated for offices and apartments to 
Western standards. 



Ryland 

Address: 3 1 Gertcena Street St. Petersburg 190000 
Tel: (812)314-6435,312-5762 
Fax: (812)314-7536 

Ryland, an American homebuilding company, is constructing a 23 home Western 
style community 20 minutes from the center of St. Petersburg. Three homes will be 
completed in October, 1993, and the remaining units by 1995. The homes have two or 
three bedrooms and will sell for approximately $250,000 each. 

St. Petersburg World Financial and Trade Center 

Address: Russia United States 

5 Griboedova Canal 963 0-J Black Mountain Road 

St. Petersburg San Diego, CA 92126 

191186 

Tel: (812)312-3557 (619)586-0748 

Fax: (812)311-0471 (619)693-0774 

The American firm, St. Petersburg World Financial and Trade Center builds 
modular, pre-fabricated offices for interim use. Firms can design their own office space 

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RDBD 5 - St Petersburg 13-12 



and have the office constructed in one month. The company also plans to build a trade 
center complex half-way between the center of the city and the airport The complex is 
planned to have 15,500 square meters of office space, 5,000 square meters of retail space, 
125 apartment units, a 500 room hotel, and a conference center. Construction of the 
complex will begin in stages after 50% of the units are pre-rented. 

The Twentieth Trust 

Address: 44 Nevsky Prospect St. Petersburg 191011 
Tel: (812)311-1696 
Fax: (812) 110-6448 

A Russian company Twentieth Trust Corporation (CTT) is building new apartment 
buildings in the city, which are well constructed by Russian standards. CTT also plans to 
develop a 36-story office building and business center complex on Vasilevsky Island, 
overlooking the Gulf of Finland. Building is currently scheduled to being in April 1994 
with occupancy scheduled for 1996. 

VMB 

Address: 6 Pisarev Street Apt. 8 St. Petersburg 190121 
Tel: (812) 114-7589, 315-4967, 210-7090 
Fax: (812) 114-7589 

VMB is a Russian owned private stock company involved in real estate 
development. The firm converts communal flats to private apartments, develops and 
manages office buildings, and is presently constructing several apartment buildings. \AIB 
is also undertaking a new project to construct cottages outside of St. Petersburg. 

ADDENDUM 

European Properties Invest Ltd. 

Address: 10 Ligovsky Prospect, office no. 24 

Tel: (812)277-6426 

Fax:(812)277-6424 

Contact: James Navagh, Director, Executive Sales 

"European Properties" is a British-owned real estate consultancy and brokerage service 
They are currently handling the renovation and rental of a five-story commercial building, 
"Europa House" on Artilleriskaya Street, near the U.S. Consulate. The property has 
approximately 12,000 square meters of office space being renovated to Western standards 



U.S. Department of Commerce Juh l^^ 

RDBD 5 - St Petersburg 13-13 



CHAPTER 14 - SELECTED DEFENSE CONVERSION SUCCESS STORIES 

1. ALLIED-SIGNAL JOINT VENTURES IN RUSSIA 

a) Allied-Signal (Bendix King) - Cockpit Avionics 

Allied-Signal (Bendix King)'s Air Transport Avionics Division has begun a joint venture with the 
Scientific Research Institute of Aviation Equipment (NIIAO) of Zhukovsky , Russia. It will be 
providing avionics to the Russian commercial air traasport market. Allied-Signal will outfit the Tu-304 
regional airliner (Tupolev) and the Yak-1 12 and Yak-42M (Yakovlev) with integrated Bendix-King 
cockpit avionics. 

b) ARIA - Integrated Avionics 

In August 1992, Allied-Signal, a major U.S. aerospace corporation, created the joint venture ARIA with 
the Scientific Research Institute of Aviation Equipment (NIIAO) to design, develop, and manufacture 
the next generation of integrated commercial avionics systems. ARIA signed contracts to supply 
integrated avionics for the Beriyev Design Bureau Be-200 multipurpose amphibian and also with Yak 
Aircraft Corporation to provide integrated systems for the Yak-242. 

c) RUBIX - Wheels and Brakes 

In August 1992, Allied-Signal's Aircraft Landing Systems business unit signed a joint venture with Rubin. 
Russia's largest supplier of wheels and brakes, to design, develop, and manufacture carbon brake systems 
for commercial aircraft being built in Russia. The joint venture will supply systems to Ilyushin for the II- 
96 and to Tupolev for the Tu-204 and its derivatives. 

2. ASTRONAUTICS - KEARFOTT - ELECTROAVTOMATIKA "AKE" 
ENTERPRISE 

In November 1993, Kearfott Guidance & Navigation Corp., a subsidiary of Astronautics Corporation of 
America started a joint venture in St. Petersburg known as "AKE". Kearfott provides a wide range of 
equipment for various programs including the Space Shuttle, Voyager, Magellan, B-l , B-2, F-14. F-16. 
and other major programs. 

Elektroavtomatika, a Russian aerospace design bureau, designs avionics and flight management systems 
for Russian commercial and military aircraft (MiG-31, MiG-29, MiG-21, Su-27, 11-96, Tu-334. and Tu- 
204). It also builds display systems for the Buran Space Shuttle and power units used in satellites. 

AKE has won several contracts to supply avionics for the Tu-334 (a 100-passenger commercial airliner 
built by Tupolev) and for the Tu-204 (similar to the Boeing 757 and Airbus 320 aircraft ). Another project 
will provide throttle angle sensors to provide inputs to control die engines powering the Tu-204 airliner. 
An airport air traffic control holographic transparent window display system for Moscow airport w as 
installed in 1994. 



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RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 14-1 



3. INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY GROUP (ITG) - FIRST OF MAY MACHINE 
BUILDING FACTORY (PERVOMAYSKIY MASHZAVOD - PMZ), KIROV 

In 1993, ITG, a California-based agricultural equipment manufacturer, established business relations with 
PMZ located in Kirov. PMZ, which formerly produced heavy equipment for the Soviet military, now 
produces railroad cranes and operates as a private joint stock company employing 3,000 employees. 

PMZ, with the help of ITG, is employing its technology and know-how to manufacture components for 
agricultural machines. PMZ recently shipped to ITG's main plant in the U.S. the first container of 
Russian-built parts for use in agricultural equipment. ITG has assigned their engineers and managers to 
work with PMZ plant in Kirov. Over the next four years, ITG hopes to increase Russian production for 
the export market while concurrently developing a Russian domestic market for its products. ITG has also 
worked out an arrangement with the International Executive Service Corps to place a volunteer executive 
familiar with defense conversion and TQM at the Kirov plant to help instill market expertise. 

4. ANALYTIC SERVICES, INC. (ANSER) 

ANSER has signed a one-year agreement with TsAGI to receive background and contract information on 
wind tunnels, flight simulators, engine testing facilities, components and materials. The acquired 
information includes facility locations, operational status and user costs. ANSER, which has set up a 
Moscow office, has similar agreements with Russian Space Agency, NPO Energiya, and the Russia 
Academy of Sciences. 

5. ASTRONAUTICS CORPORATION OF AMERICA 

This manufacturer of navigation and flight instruments, displays, and communications equipment is 
involved in a joint venture with a Russian electronics company, Elektroavtomatika. The joint company is 
called AKE, Astronautics Kearfott Elektroavtomatika. 



6. ATASCO 

This U.S. sales and leasing company has begun a joint venture with Aeroflot St. Petersburg to form a 
startup Russian airline, ASA. 

7. ROCKWELL IN RUSSIA 

Rockwell, a diversified high technology company, opened a Science Center in Moscow to conduct 
research in association with a number of Russian research institutes and production enterprises. 

Rockwell's Collins Commercial Avionics Division is working jointly with the State Scientific Research 
Institute of Aviation Systems [GosNIIAS], employing more than 100 Russian software engineers, to 
develop the avionics integration package for the new Ilyushin I1-96M commercial jet-liner for which 
Collins will supply the entire avionics configuration. 

Rockwell Collins has provided and integrated avionics for the I1-96M wide-body jet with Pratt & Whitney 
engines. 

U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 14-2 



Collins Commercial Avionics was awarded a contract by Bravia to supply communications and navigation 
equipment for the Tu-204 airliner. 

Rockwell's Communications Systems Division and GosNIIAS are conducting some engineering 
feasibility research and studying the market in Russia for air traffic management systems that would utilize 
both the U.S. Global Positioning Satellite System and GLONASS, the comparable Russian system. T; 
also operate a high-technology design center in Moscow, staffed by more than 20 Russian engineers, 
involved in algorithm and signal processing design and related software and hardware development. 

Rockwell's Space Systems-Division, in a joint development with NPO Energiya, is developing the 
docking hardware for the ten docking missions planned for the Russian Mir Space Station and the U.S. 
Space Shuttle. 

Rockwell Automotive Division is working with KAMAZ (a heavy truck producer) and with AvtoVaz (a 
automobile producer in Togliatti) to provide components for the vehicles produced by these companies. 
The Allen-Bradley Division is participating in the modernization and conversion of Russian industry by 
supplying automation and control equipment and systems for a wide range of industries. 

8. LITTON INDUSTRIES, INC. 

Litton Industries is providing inertial navigation systems to Aeroflot Airlines and has been selected to 
provide equipment for the new Ilyushin I1-96-M and the Tupolev Bravia Tu-204-222 transport aircraft. 
Litton is also negotiating with Russian authorities to provide air traffic control communications equipment 
for their airports. 

9. LOCKHEED 

a) LOCKHEED - KHRUNICHEV - ENERGIYA INC. (LKEI) 

The joint venture between Lockheed, a U.S. corporation, and two Russian aerospace companies. 
Khrunichev Enterprise and Energiya, seeks to provide a wide range of launch services. 

b) LOCKHEED MISSILES & SPACE CO. 

Lockheed has established an agreement with the Khrunichev Plant to help market the Proton launch 
vehicle (which Khrunichev manufactures) to the West. NPO Energiya has become a partner in diis 
venture which is named Lockheed-Khrunichev-Energiya Int'l. Lockheed has also signed an agreement 
with NPO Energiya to cooperate on future space programs. 



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10. UNITED TECHNOLOGIES CORPORATION 

a) PRATT & WHITNEY/ILYUSHIN IL-96 PROGRAM 

Pratt & Whitney and other U.S. suppliers have provided the Russian firm Ilyushin with equipment and 
technical support to manufacture a prototype I1-96M long-range, wide-body aircraft, which is now being 
flight tested. Full scale production of this aircraft and a cargo version-both of which will receive Russian 
and U.S. FAA certification-is scheduled to commence in the near future. The value of the Pratt & 
Whitney engines and other U.S. content items used in each aircraft will range between $40-$45 million. 
Ilyushin currendy holds Letters of Intent for 30 aircraft. Current market estimates through the year 2005 
represent potential export sales for U.S. suppliers of $10 billion. 

b) PRATT & WHITNEY/KLIMOV CORP./ENERGOMASH 

Pratt & Whitney is providing PW2337 engines for the I1-96M four-engine wide-body jet. It has 
established an agreement with the Russian rocket engine manufacturer NPO Energomash to market their 
RD-170, RD-701 and RD-180 engines. Pratt and Whitney Canada has formed a joint venture with 
Klimov Corp. to develop and manufacture small gas turbine engines for civil applications in Russia and 
the NIS. 

c) PRATT & WHITNEY/NPO ENERGOMASH ROCKET ENGINE 
PROGRAM 

Pratt & Whitney has an agreement with the rocket design company, NPO Energomash, granting Pratt & 
Whitney access to a vast array of space propulsion products and technologies developed by the Russian 
firm. A contract to test tri-propellant components at NASA Marshall Space Flight Test Center has been 
signed. 

d) PRATT & WHITNEY JOINT VENTURES IN RUSSIA 

Pratt & Whitney has invested $150 million to create joint ventures with two Russian companies—Perm 
Motors and Aviadvigatel— to make aircraft engines. One of the ventures would design and build 
commercial aircraft engines. The other venture will develop land-based turbines for gas-pumping stations. 

e) HAMILTON STANDARD/NAUKA SCIENCE & PRODUCTION 
ENTERPRISE 

Hamilton Standard has signed a long term collaboration agreement with the Nauka Scientific and 
Production Enterprise, a large manufacturer of aircraft environmental control systems in Russia, to 
create a joint stock company in Moscow. This company will design and build these systems for the 
Tupolev Tu-334 and Tu-204 aircraft. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 14-4 



HAMILTON STANDARD/PERM UNIT DESIGN BUREAU 

Hamilton Standard and the Perm Unit Design Bureau have agreed to jointly design and produce aircraft 
engine control systems for the new PS-90P engine being developed for the Ilyushin 11-96 and the Tupolev 
Tu-204. 

g) HAMILTON STANDARD SPACE ACTIVITIES 

Hamilton Standard has business agreements with three Russian enterprises: (1) Zvezda - for space suits, 
portable life supports, ejection seats and pressure suits; (2) Nauka - aircraft and spacecraft environmental 
and thermal control equipment; and (3) NIIKhimMash - spacecraft regenerable life support systems. 
Hamilton Standard is evaluating Russian space suits and environmental control systems/life support 
hardware used on the Mir station for NASA. It is also working on developing a common spacesuit for use 
during space walks on upcoming Shuttle to Mir missions. 

11. WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CORPORATION 

On March 30, 1994, Westinghouse Electric Corporation signed three business agreements in atomic 
energy, power generation, and air traffic management. These agreements entail capitalizing on joint 
Russian/Westinghouse technology investments to enhance key sectors of Russian infrastructure. 

The agreement with MINATOM, the Russian Ministry for Atomic Energy, will result in enhanced safety 
of operating nuclear power plants and incorporating safety technology in the nuclear plants under 
construction. The business agreement will lead to four partnerships in plant engineering, instrumentation 
and control, nuclear fuel, and low-level waste management. MINATOM operates 23 civilian nuclear 
power plants in Russia. 

The agreement with the Unified Electric Power System of Russia Of eES) , the giant power generation 
company with 210 megawatts of installed capacity, will concentrate on power plant efficiency and reducing 
air emissions. The joint ventures will modernize existing turbine generation equipment, repower older 
stations with state-of-the-art equipment, and develop new projects. YeES operates 51 power plants and 
owns stock in Prussia's 70 regional utility companies. 

12. NORDEN - St. PETERSBURG 

On November 19, 1993, Norden Systems (now a part of Westinghouse Corp.) and the All-Russian 
Scientific Research Institute for Radio Equipment (VNIIRA), a Russian manufacturer of air traffic 

controls and navigational equipment, decided to combine their extensive experience by forming a joint 
venture known as "Norden-St. Petersburg." 

Norden-St. Petersburg initially intends to use Western-built equipment to rapidly upgrade airports in 
Russia, the Newly Independent States (NIS), and Eastern Europe. This joint venture eventually intends to 
qualify Russian sources for air traffic control equipment. Future plans include the development and 
upgrading of existing VNIIRA equipment and manufacture of Western equipment under license. The 
market for air traffic control equipment in die former Soviet Union is estimated to be $10.5 billion. This 
joint venture secured its first contract in die last quarter of 1993. 



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RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 14-5 



13. THE BOEING COMPANY 

Russia's Interstate Aviation Committee (MAK) has certified the Boeing 737 family for ownership and 
operation by MS airlines. An enormous new market is opening up for Western aircraft, with potential 
sales of 1 ,300 jet transports over the next 10 to 12 years. The independent Russian airline, Transaero, is 
currently leasing two Boeing 737s and took leasing delivery of two new B-757s in 1994. Aeroflot-Russian 
International Airlines is also leasing two B-767s. 



Boeing has opened the Boeing Technical Research Center in Moscow. This will be a center for research 
projects jointly developed with Russian universities and technical institutes to take advantage of Russian 
scientific/technological expertise. Potential projects include research and development for computational 
fluid dynamics and research into stronger metals and alloys. 

BOEING DEFENSE & SPACE GROUP has agreed to team up with the Russian company 
NIIKhimMash in order to jointly develop life-support systems, possibly for NASA's international space 
station. 

15. BROOKE GROUP 

This firm is involved in a joint venture with the Mil Design Bureau to market and produce Mil-Brooke 
helicopters called Mil-Brooke Helicopters, Ltd. Mil-Brooke has selected Danubian Aircraft Company 
of Hungary to be its official service center for Europe. The joint venture is currently looking for other 
possible service centers in North America, Latin American and Asia. 

16. CFM INT'L (GENERAL ELECTRIC) 

This joint venture between General Electric Company and the French company SNECMA has been 
negotiating a deal to re-engine 20 Il-86s for Ilyushin Design Bureau. 

17. DYNAIR TECHNOLOGIES INT'L 

DYNAIR was granted $250,000 by the city of St. Petersburg and the U.S. Trade and Development 
Agency for a feasibility study for an air cargo center at Pulkovo Airport in St. Petersburg. It has recently 
been awarded the contract to develop the air cargo center and free trade zone around the airport by the St. 
Petersburg municipal government. 

18. ERNST & YOUNG 

The U.S. accounting and aviation consulting firm has won a tender offered by the U.S. Trade and 
Development Agency (TDA) to lead a group of U.S. companies in the development of a business plan for 
the construction of a major international airport in Novosibirsk, which will become a major transportation 
hub between Europe, the Far East and S.E. Asia. The project is being financed by a $200,000 grant 
provided by U.S. TDA. The project at Novosibirsk's Tolmachevo Airport will cost an estimated $1.1 
billion and is targeted for completion in 2025. Other firms included in the group are Boeing Aerosystems 
Int'l., The Austin Co., Dean Witter, Gensler & Associates and P&D Technologies. 



U.S. Department of Commerce My 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 14-6 



19. FAIRCHILD AIRCRAFT 

Fairchild has entered a joint venture NORMVEST with a Russian fastener manufacturer, Normal 
Production Association which combines bom companies' capabilities to export quality fasteners to the 
worldwide aerospace market. 

Fairchild has been funded $400,000 by the U.S. Trade & Development Agency for a study on the 
development of a new small (two to five seat) aircraft by Ilyushin. 

20. GULFSTREAM AEROSPACE CORP. 

Gulfstream is working with Saturn/Lyulka to develop business aircraft. It is also in a partnership with 
Sukhoi Design Bureau to develop Su-21 and Su-51 business aircraft with Rolls-Royce engines. 

21. HONEYWELL, INC. 

Honeywell has provided inertial reference systems and other avionics for the Tu-204 airliner. 

22. LEHMAN BROTHERS 

This firm has been selected by Russia's Ministry of Transport to head a consortium that will prepare a 
master plan for the modernization and development of Moscow civil airports. Along with Lehman 
Brothers are KPMG Peat Marwick, Texas construction firm, Brown Root, and law firm, McGuire, 
Woods, Battle, Booth. The study will cover the creation of a net air transportation hub in Moscow and 
the costs of modernizing and expanding the airports. 

23. MCDONNELL DOUGLAS AEROSPACE 

McDonnell Douglas Aerospace has established a joint research pact with several Russian companies for 
the development of moon rover vehicles and hopes to benefit from Russian space technology in this 
project. 

McDonnell Douglas is investigating cooperative ties with the Russian Institute of Space Research (IK.I). 
the Iavochkin Association and the Mobile Vehicle Engineering Institute. 

24. MENASCO AEROSYSTEMS 

Menasco has been negotiating with Gidromash to jointly manufacture aircraft parts. 

25. MOTOROLA'S IRIDIUM CORP. 

Motorola has cooperated with Khrunichev and will use Russian proton launchers to help launch a 
commercial satellite from a Russian site. 



U.S. Department of Commerce Julv !**> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 14-7 



26. NASA 

NASA has signed a $1 million contract with NPO Energiya for Soyuz Docking System Evaluation. In 
December 1993, it signed an MOU on Cooperation in Fundamental Aeronautical Sciences with the Russian 
State Committee for Defense Branches of Industry (GOSKOMBORONPROM). Eight project areas have 
been identified including high temperature composites, environmental concerns in aviation, advanced 
aerospace materials, hypersonic technologies and experimental test facilities. 

27. RUSSIAN AMERICAN FAR EASTERN TRANSPORT COMPANY (RAFETC) 

The recently formed U.S. -Russian joint venture has begun work on a project to install ATC systems and 
construct a terminal at the international airport in the Siberian city of Khabarovsk, a key link between the 
U.S. and Asia. The Ralph M. Parson Co. has signed an agreement with the Lhabarovsk design institute, 
Dalaeroproekt, to perform a joint feasibility study for the reconstruction of the airport and the 
construction of a new freight airport at nearby Vanino. The consortium, headed by Ralph M. Parsons 
Co., includes these participating U.S. companies: AMR Services Corp., Harris Corp. and Hughes 
Airport Systems. 

28. RUSSIAN-AMERICAN SCIENCE, INC. 

This company is the official commercial representative in the U.S. of the Russian Academy of Sciences 
and offers access to all of the Academy's scientific institutes, research materials and databases. It markets 
Russian technologies, including the Beriev Taganrog "wing-in-ground-effect" (WIG) amphibious aircraft, 
in the West. 

29. SPACE COMMERCE CORP. 

This firm markets goods and services for several Russian space companies and organizations, including 
Glavcosmos, Zvezda Research, Development & Production Enterprise, Lavachkin Association and 
Mashinostroenia Scientific & Production Enterprise. 

30. TELEDYNE CONTINENTAL MOTORS 

Teledyne is currently working on engines for 11-103 wide transport and Yak-112 mid-range aircraft. 

31. WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC CO. 

The lead U.S. company in the Raduga Consortium ("raduga" means "rainbow"), which was formed in 
1993 to manage and implement a 15-year project to modernize the air traffic management system of the 
former Soviet republics. Westinghouse estimates the value of the work to be done for ATC modernization 
in the NIS range from about $10 to $12 billion. The consortium also consists of the French company 
Thomson-CSF, the joint venture company Buran (which includes Italy's Alenia), and a number of Russian 
companies. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 14-8 



CHAPTER - 15 BUSINESS PRACTICES, SAFETY AND SECURITY 



AN ANONYMOUS BUSINESSMAN'S COMMENTS: 



While Russia's market, technologies, and available expertise offer unique opportunities, 
prospective business persons should go in with their eyes open. Changing tax policies, nascent 
banking system and fluctuating currency, combined with reports of unusual business practices 
including corruption/ payoffs, and personal safety considerations should all be factored into 
investment decisions. While Russia offers a great deal to potential investors, its emerging and 
sometimes challenging business environment needs to be kept in perspective. 

Tips on doing business in Russia 

1 . Doing business in Russia is not for the timid. It is not for the shy, for the unimaginative, 
or for the unadventurous. It is not for the easily frazzled or frustrated. Doing business in 
Russia to-day is for that quintessentially American type — the pioneer. 

People who succeed in Russia are daring, creative, innovative, persistent, patient, and 
flexible. Some people succeed in a big way; others fail in a big way, many more just keep 
plugging along. It requires a willingness to take on greater risks than in other markets 

2. Everything here can be difficult, or at least different. Russia has been cut off from the 
West for most of its history. Russia has little experience with capitalism or democracy. 

3. Russia is not like America. You cannot make it like America, no matter how much you 
scream and shout. Do not waste your energy. 

4. Don't expect your heat, your phone, and your electricity to work all the time. 

5. Don't break Russian laws. Avoid drugs, sleazy business partners, bribery, and the mafia 
Drink alcoholic drinks in moderate quantities. Avoid all food or drinks offered by casual 
acquaintances or strangers. Avoid trying to keep up with your local partners or hosts 
while drinking during receptions. 

6. Don't pay off the mafia. If you are worried about your safety, hire a reputable security 
service. Do not carry too much cash. Use credit cards or travellers checks 

7. Keep a low profile. Do not wear expensive jewelry, clothing or travel in showy cars. 
They attract criminals like flies. Avoid casinos, they are extremely expensive 

8. Develop common sense, lots of it. 

U.S. Department of Commerce Julv W*^ 

RDBD - 5 St. Petersburg 15-1 



9. Learn some Russian, even if its only "Da", "Nyet", and the alphabet. 

10. Don't panic. (The motto is borrowed from the "Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy". It 
applies equally well in Russia.) 

1 1 . Invest a great deal of time trying to figure the country out. The more you understand, the 
better. Get out of your hotel and walk around. See what people are wearing, and buying, 
and selling. Walk down Old Arbat and bargain for souvenirs. Spend an evening with a 
Russian family, and learn all you can. 

12. Don't expect to come to Russia, spend three days, and do a deal. To build a partnership 
that works takes a personal investment of weeks or months. 

13. Do not let culture shock impair your business judgment. Sometime during your first six 
months, everything will seem hopeless. That does not mean it is. 

14. Don't get intimidated when Russians shout at you. They are an emotional people, and a 
little loud. 

15. Don't come to Russia to try to make a fast buck. It won't work. 

16. Don't go it alone. Come to the US & FCS Business briefing, and join the American 
Chamber of Commerce. Make friends with other Westerners in Russia. 

17. Avoid doing business with new companies. Choose established old-line enterprises or 
companies with stable backgrounds that manufacture or produce the product in-house. 



SECURITY COMPANIES OPERATING IN RUSSIA 

Control Risk Group 

8200 Greens Pond Drive, Suite 1010 

McLean VA 22102 

Edward G. Grubb 

Phone: (703)893-0083 

Fax: (703)893-8611 

A large international security company with 250 employees around the world. Agents for a 
Lloyds of London consortium (Cassidy Davis Hiscox). 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD - 5 St. Petersburg 1 5-2 



Corporate Risk International (CRI), 

1 1250 Waples Mill Road 

Fairfax, VA 22030 

President: Sean M. McWeeney 

Phone: (703)359-3901 

Fax: (703) 359-3903 

A full service corporate security consulting and crisis management firm Specializes in 
background investigation of foreign partners, travel risk reports, international extortion and 
v kidnap negotiations. An international response team is available on call on a 24-hours a day basis 
worldwide. CRI is the exclusive agent for Professional Indemnity Agency, Inc., coverholders for 
Lloyds of London and several Class-A rated insurance companies. 



Kroll & Associates 

900 3rd. Avenue, 7th Floor 

New York, NY 10022 

Norb Garett, Managing Director-International 

Phone: (212)833-3261 

Fax: (212) 644-5794 

Moscow office: Richard Pryor 
Phone: 011-70-95-943-9404 
Fax: 011-70-95-943-9440 

Washington, DC office: 
Phone:202-659-1177 
Fax: 202-659-9546 

A full service international security and investigative consulting firm with 260 employees and 
1,000 contracted associates worldwide. Services offered include corporate and physical security, 
business partner evaluation and other due diligence, litigation support, crisis management, kidnap 
and hostage response, and overland investigations. The consultant of choice of the American 
International Group for its kidnap and ransom, malicious product tampering, and sabotage 
coverage. 



International Business Research (U.S.A.) Inc. 

92 Nassau Street 

Princeton N.J. 08542-4519 

Phone: (609)683-1100 

Fax: (609)683-8917 

Michael Allison, President 

U.S. Department of Commerce July l°°o 

RDBD - 5 St. Petersburg 1 5 - 3 



A security consulting company offering due diligence checks (on foreign partners), product 
diversion investigation services and international business research. 



INTERPASS, Ltd. 

(International Protection and Security Services, Ltd.) 

88 North Broadway 

IrvingtonNY 10533 

Phone: (914)591-5200 

Fax: (914) 591-5362 

Dennis M. Dwyer, President 

A full service, corporate security firm with offices in New York and Washington, DC, operates 
worldwide. INTERPASS, Ltd. Provides threat assessments, executive protection, security 
surveys, technical security assistance and complete investigative services, including due diligence, 
asset searches, product diversion, financial fraud and money laundering deterrence. 



The Parvus Group 
8403 Colesville Road, Suite 610 
Silver Spring. MD 20910 
(Incorporated in 1 994) 

Eric Bassett, Manager, Business Development 
Tel: (301)589-4949 
Fax: (301)589-0007 
Moscow 

ZAO Parvus-Dzheriko, a Parvus Group subsidiary based in Russia, has representive offices 
located throughout Central Eurasia. In all, Parvus has several hundred security and investigative 
associates on call in Russia, Ukraine, the Caucasus, the Baltic countries and Central Asia. ZAO is 
officially incorporated in Moscow. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD - 5 St. Petersburg 1 5-4 



CHAPTER 16 - DIRECTORY OF BUSINESS SERVICES 



BUSINESS CENTERS IN ST. PETERSBURG 



The following business centers are equipped with fax, telex, computers, photocopiers, etc 
and provide translators. 

American Business Center ™ - St. Petersburg 

Janna Agasiev 

57 Bolshaya Morskaya, St. Petersburg 

Int'lTel: 011-7-812-850-1900 

Int'lFax: 011-7-812-850-1901 

Local Phone: 110-6042 

Local Fax: 311-0794 



Costa Ltd. 



Michael Linehan 
Tel/Fax: 271-4110 



Grand Hotel Europe 



Cristof Schleissing, Manager 
Tel: 312-0072 Ext. 6231, 6234 
Fax: 119-6002 
Telex: 64121073 



Hotel Astoria 



Larissa Zharikova, Manager 
Tel: 210-5866, 5867, 5868 
Fax: 311-4212,311-7362 



Neptune Business Center 



Tatiana Chueva, Manager 
Tel: 210-1728, 1707 ^ 
Fax: 311-2270 



American Chamber of Commerce in Russia 

American Business Center ™, Suite 735 

2 Berezhkovskaya Nab. 

Moscow, Russia 

Phone: (01 1-7-095) 941-8435 

Fax: (011-7-095)941-8437 

James Tilley, President 

Peter Charow, Executive Director 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



Juh W«* 



16-1 



NON-PROFIT BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT SERVICES 
in St. Petersburg 



Center for Citizen Initiatives 



4 Quarenghi lane, Room 4 1 8 

Spb 191180 

Tel: (812) 271-0467 



Valentin Yemeliin 
Vice President 



Citizens' Democracy Corps, Inc. 

38 Sadovaya St. 

Spb 190037 

Tel: (812)315-7393 



John Vozza 
General Director 



International Executive Service Corps 



Moscow 

Tel/Fax: (095)280-7771 



Walter Ousterman 
Country Director for Russia 
Andrew Wolff, Assistant 



PERSONNEL SERVICES 

The following companies specialize in the recruitment and selection of personnel for 
permanent and temporary positions. 



BusinessLink 



Stanislav Yeremeyev, General Manager 
Tel: 315-5387 
Tel/Fax: 315-4951 



HILL International 



Bruce Zelony / Julia Troschchy 
23 Bolshaya Morskaya 
Tel: 312-6701 
Fax: 312-5368 



Personnel Corps 



Hilary Greene/Michelle Schorr 
104 Nevsky prospect 
Tel: 275-4586 
Tel/Fax: 275-8323 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



16-2 



July 1996 



LOCAL TRANSPORTATION SERVICES 
in St. Petersburg 



Avtodom (Moika Emb.56) 

Tel 315-9043 

Mercedes-Benz cars with Russian drivers 



Grand Hotel Europe 

Tel: 113-8071 

Foreign cars with Russian drivers. 

Hotel Astoria 

Tel: 210-5858 

Foreign cars with Russian drivers. 

Interavto (Hotel Moskva) 

Tel: 274-2367,274-9364 
Mercedes-Benz cars with Russian drivers. 

Lingva 

Tel: 312-1824 

Russian cars with Russian drivers . 

Matralen Cars (Lyubotinsky proezd) 

Tel: 298-6804/3648 

Ford Scorpio cars with Russian driver. 



COURIER SERVICES IN ST. PETERSBURG 

DHL 

5 Giiboyedova Canal, Off. 325 Alisdair Munro 

Spb General Director 

Tel: (812) 31 1-2649, 210-7545,7654 Alexander Kiselev 



Federal Express 

2 Mayakovskogo st. Sergei Moroshkin 

Spb 191025 Director 

Tel: (812)279-1287,1931 Mikhail Batkhin 

Fax: (812) 273-2139 Deputy Director 

U.S. Department of Commerce July l«wt« 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 1 6-3 



UPS 

12 Karavannaya st. 

Spb 

Tel: (812) 312-2915 

Tel/Fax: (812) 314-7037 



TNT 

50 Liteinyi privatized. 

Spb 

Tel: (812) 273-6007 

Fax: (812) 104-3684 






Margarita Kuchinskaya 
General Manager 



Alexander Sawka 
General Country Manager 
Igor Koltsov 



REAL ESTATE FIRMS 

in St. Petersburg 



Atlantic Investment 

Spb 

104Nevsky pr., 
Tel: (812)275-5864 
Fax: (812)275-4587 



Susan Kersh 



BusinessLink 

Spb 199178 
14, 13 th line, 
Vasilievsky island 
Tel: (812) 218-6900 
Fax: (812) 218-7940 



Stanislav Yeremeyev 
General Director 



DINAT'F 

Spb 

12 Ligovsky pr., apt. 72 
Tel: (812) 112-0765 
Fax: (812) 112-0765 



Dmitry Schiotin 
Manager 



Dom Plus 

Spb 191186 

3 Griboyedova canal 

Tel: (812) 312-1132,210-7607 

Fax: (812) 312-8351 



Andrei Ivanov 
Executive Director 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



16-4 



July 1996 



Inpredservice 

Spb 191187 

34 Kutuzova emb. 

Tel: (812) 272-1500, 273-7973 

Fax: (812)279-5024 



Pavel Kalinin 
Deputy Director 



Interoccidental 

Spb 

49 Vosstaniia st. 

Tel: (812)273-4323,5406,272-1857 

Fax: (812)272-8031 



Edvard Tiktinsky 
Sales Manager 



US BUSINESSES IN ST. PETERSBURG CONSULATE DISTRICT 



AT&T -Dalnaya Svyaz' 

American Express 

Americar (Chrysler) 

Atlantic Investment 

Ben & Jerry's 

Petrozavodsk 

Benson & Company 

BIONT Corporation 

BusinesssLink 

Burrows Paper Corporation 

Catalog Express 

Caterpillar 

Coca-Cola 

Computerland 

Delta Airlines 

Delta Telecom -U.S. West 

DHL 

Dialog Invest 

Digital Equipment 

Elegant Logic 

Eli Lilly & Elanco Ltd. 

Fresh Air 

Gibson Musical Instruments 

Goodwill Games, Inc 

HILL International 

Honeywell 



Tel 


186-7537 


Fax 


252-1252 


Tel 


119-6009 


Fax 


119-6011 


Tel 


544-0590 


Fax 


544-5824 


Tel 


275-8590 


Fax 


275-8590 


Tel 


(81400)74108 






Tel 


311-7097 


Fax 


311-7097 


Tel 


226-4456 


Fax 


226-9100 


Tel 


218-6900 


Fax 


218-7940 


Tel 


314-5148 


Fax 


314-5148 


P.O 


Box 105 Spb 196070 




Tel 


311-5644 


Fax 


311-9557 


Tel 


271-6189 


Fax 


274-2678 


Tel 


224-0932 


Fax 


224-0932 


Tel 


311-5819,20 






Tel 


275-4149 


Fax 


275-0130 


Tel 


311-2649 


Fax 


314-6473 


Tel 


164-8956 


Fax 


164-9392 


Tel 


298-2370 


Fax 


298-0748 


Tel 


311-1064 


Fax 


311-0452 


Tel 


299-7030 
550-3026 


Fax 


299-7030 


P.O 


Box 163 SPb 197101 




Tel 


298-4339 






Tel 


232-7364 


Fax 


232-7364 


Tel 


312-6701 


Fax 


312-53(1$ 


Tel 


275-3504 


Fax 


275-2804 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



16-5 



Julv W* 



Hotel Development Corp. 


Tel 


314-3178 


Fax: 


311-0471 


IBM 


Tel 


312-6017 


Fax: 


312-3887 


mS, Inc. 


Tel 


311-5838 


Fax: 


311-3193 


International Group 


Tel 


311-2483 


Fax: 


311-2483 


InterOccidental 


Tel 


273-4323 


Fax: 


272-8031 


ITF Corp. (Petrozavodsk) 


Tel 


(81400)94034 








Fax 


(from the US): 


47-851-8597 


Johnson SC 


Tel 


311-8990 


Fax: 


315-5156 


Kamennyi Ostrov 


Tel 


234-1011 


Fax: 


234-1266 


3 M-Lenterefonstroi 


Tel 


101-4474 


Fax: 


172-7365 


Madison Brands Inc. 


Tel 


543-5462 






Otis St. Petersburg 


Tel 


252-3694 


Fax: 


252-5315 


Personnel Corps 


Tel 


275-4586 


Fax: 


275-8323 


Petroff Motors (General Motors) 


Tel 


235-2386 






Procter & Gamble 


Tel 


113-8066 
Ext. 455 


Fax: 


Ext. 459 


Petersburg Product Intl 










(Gillette) 


Tel 


106-3821 


Fax: 


106-3479 


Rank Xerox 


Tel 


315-7670 


Fax: 


315-7773 


PJR Nabisco (RJR Petro) 


Tel 


213-1700 


Fax: 
Fax: 


213-1955 
213-1835 


Ryland Homes 


Tel 


314-6515 


Fax: 


314-7536 


Russki Market 


Tel 


112-6864 


Fax: 




RusTex International 


Tel 


109-6914 


Fax: 


109-6914 


Sara Lee 


Tel 


114-5660 


Fax: 


114-0740 


SPASISS (SatCom) 


Tel 


218-6313 


Fax: 


218-6313 


Sovan Teleport (JV) 


Tel 


311-8412 


Fax: 


311-7129 


Tambrands St. Petersburg 


Tel 


560-1319 


Fax: 


560-9714 


Telinfo 


Tel 


315-6412 


Fax: 


312-7341 


Teleport Spb 


Tel 


567-3731 


Fax: 


265-0102 


The Source 


Tel 


274-3080 


Fax: 




TDV Ford Motor Dealership 


Tel 


521-4613 


Fax: 


521-8547 


UPS 


Tel 


312-2915 


Fax: 


314-7037 


Wal-Rus Ltd 


Tel 


273-6746 


Fax: 


273-5192 



CONSULTING/REAL ESTATE/LAW FIRMS 



Arthur Andersen 
Baker & McKenzie 



Tel: 


350-4813 


Fax: 


213-7874 


Tel: 


310-5446 
310-5941 
310-5544 


Fax: 


310-5944 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



16-6 



July 1996 



Costa 

Coopers & Lybrand 

Sharon Deeney, Attorney 

Ernst & Young 

Hotel Development Corp 

IBSInc 
IMID 

InterOccidental 
McKinsey & Co 
Pepper, Hamilton and Scheets 
Russian- American Law Firm 
RusTex International 

Sam Stern Law Office, 
(Pillsbury, Madison and Sutro) 
Transworld Communications 
World Business Relations 



Tel 


271-4110 


Fax 


271-4110 


Tel 


210-5528 


Fax 


210-5528 


Tel 


356-6990 






Tel 


116-0157 


Fax 


312-5320 


Tel 


314-3178 


Fax 


311-0471 


Tel 


311-5838 






Tel 


264-6614 


Fax 


264-6614 


Tel 


273-4323 


Fax 


272-8031 


Tel 


119-6050 


Fax 


119-6049 


Tel 


273-2377 


Fax 


273-2377 


Tel 


114-5660 


Fax 


114-0740 


Tel 


109-6914 
273-4440 


Fax 


109-6914 


Tel 


275-3497 


Fax 


275-4587 


Tel 


112-4787 






Tel 


246-4001 







St. Petersburg Stock Exchange 

Dr. Grigori A. Rozhkov, Director of Public Affairs 

103, V.O. Bolshoy Prospect 

Exhibition complex, pav. 6, 

St. Petersburg, Russia 199106 

Tel: (812)355-59-62 

Fax: (812)355-59-88 

Investments International Business Journal 

Georgievskiy per. 1 

103009 Moscow 

Tel: (095) 292 3812, 292-1869 

Fax: (095)292 3812 



U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



16-7 



Julv WOo 



THE SABIT DEFENSE CONVERSION PROGRAM 

Fostering U.S.-NIS Business Contacts and Opportunities 

WHAT IS THE SABIT DEFENSE CONVERSION PROGRAM? 

The U.S. Department of Commerce's Special American Business Internship Training Program (SABIT; is 
collaborating with the Bureau of Export Administration (BXA) to implement a $1 .2 million specialized 
training program for over 100 defense experts from Belarus, Kazakstan, Russia, and Ukraine. This Initiative 
is designed to facilitate the conversion of defense enterprises in the New Independent States fNISj while 
developing long-term U.S.-NIS business relations and enhancing U.S. trade opportunities in the region. 

HOW CAN THE SABIT DEFENSE CONVERSION PROGRAM ASSIST U.S. FIRMS? 

The SABIT Defense Conversion Program provides a unique marketing tool for U.S. companies interested in 
doing business in the NIS. The Defense Conversion Program interns are influential mid- to senior-level NIS 
business managers in the same or similar sectors as their U.S. host firms. Upon returning home after their 
internships, they should be in a position to facilitate contacts between U.S. firms and NIS businesses, 
generating a receptive climate for future exports. Already successful U.S. /NIS partnerships resulting from 
the Defense Conversion program include Dresser/Mashzavod (Kazakstan), Raytheon/Ukrainian Ministry of 
Defense, R.G. Hansen/Kommunar (Ukraine), Senco/Soyuz/Electronprylad/Lance Marketing (Ukraine). 
General Electric/Viam/Rybinsk Motors (Russia), Pepe/Zenit (Kazakstan),, and Alliant Tech/Pavlograd 
Chemical Plant (Ukraine). 

HOW DOES THE SABIT DEFENSE CONVERSION PROGRAM ASSIST NIS TRAINEES? 

The Defense Conversion Program provides interns with two months of comprehensive training, consisting of 
two weeks of management training in D.C., followed by six weeks of hands-on exposure to U.S. companies 
currently converting their product mix to consumer goods. This training will enable the interns to further the 
conversion of their NIS defense enterprises from weapons production toward production of much-needed 
industrial and consumer goods. It will also help to improve their global competitiveness by gaining access to 
technologies, expertise, and contacts in the U.S. 

WHAT COSTS ARE COVERED BY THE PROGRAM? 

The SABIT Defense Conversion Program covers the majority of the costs involved in providing the training, 
including all airfare, housing insurance, and per diem. The Department of Commerce also screens all intern 
applications, referring only the top candidates to the U.S. host firms, and arranges all logistics of intern travel 
and training. 

WHAT IS EXPECTED OF U.S. HOST FIRMS? 

U.S. host firms commit to providing six weeks of management or appropriate commercially-oriented 
scientific training to the interns. Participating companies are also required to provide local transportation and 
interpreters while the interns are training with them. 

WHERE CAN I GET MORE INFORMATION? 

To receive a brochure and application kit for the SABIT Defense Conversion Program, 
please contact Sabit Coordinator; phone (202)482-3984. or tax (202) 482-5650. 



U.S. Department of Commerce July w^t. 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



DIRECTORY ENTERPRISE PROFILE 



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Department of Commerce 
Bureau of Export Administration 
Room 3878 

14th & Constitution Ave. NW 
Washington, DC 20230 USA 

fax: 202-482-5650 



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U.S. Department of Commerce 
RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



ORDER FORM 



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ORDER BY PHONE (euu*ate mm. t*c) 
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1-800-553-NTIS. RUSH service available for additional fee. 

ONLINE ORDERING 

Order through the Internet 24 hours a day: orrJers@rteJed*orlc.gov 
If concerned about Internet security, you may regsler your credit 

card at NTIS. Simply call (703) 487-4682. 

FEDWORLD* 

Please call for connect information: (703) 487-4223. 

BILL ME 

(U.S., Canada, and Mexico only.) 

DO NOT USE THIS FORM. 

NTIS will gladly bill your order, for an additional fee of $750. 

A request to be billed must be on a purchase order or company 

letterhead. An authorizing signature, contact name. 

and telephone number should be included with the request 

Requests may be mailed or faxed. 

REFUND POLICY 

Although NTIS cannot accept returns for credit or refund, we wl 

gladly replace any item you requested if we made an error r 

filling your order, if the item was defective, or ff you received < n 

damaged condition. Just call our Customer Service Department 

at (703) 487-4660. 



NTIS HANDLING FEE 


Value of Order 


Handling Fee 


$10.00 or less 


....$2.00 


$10.01 -$50.00 


$4.00 


$50.01 -$100.00 


$6.00 


Over $100.00 


$8 00 





Add $2.00 to handling fee for orders sent outside 
the United States. Canada, and Mexico. 



PRODUCT SELECTION 



NTIS PRODUCT NUMBER 




INTERNAL CUSTOMER 
ROUTING (OPTIONAL) 

UP TO 8 CHARACTERS 


UNIT 
PRICE 


QUANTITY 


NTERNATONAi. 
AKMAK.FEE 

| SEE BELOW! 


TOTAL PRICE 


(ORDERING BY TITLE ALONE 
WILL DELAY YOUR ORDER) 


PAPER 
COPY 


MICRO- 
FICHE 


MAGNETIC 
TAPE* 


DISKETTE 


CD-ROM 


OTHER 








$ 














s 


$ 






$ 














$ 


$ 






$ 














$ 


$ 






$ 














$ 


$ 






$ 














$ 


5 


* CIRCLE 

REQUIREMENTS 


3480 1600 6250 
CARTRIDGE BPI BPI 


LABELING 


FORMAT 






STANDARD NONLABELED 


EBCDIC ASCII 




TOTAL 


A_ 


PLEASE NOTE 

Unless microfiche or other is specified, paper copy will be sent. 




HI 

S 

G 


iNDUNG fee 
PER ORDER 


$ 


Please call the Sales Desk at (703) 487-4650 for information on multiple copy discounts available for certain documents 
and price verification. 

Out-Of-Print Surcharae 


RAND TOTAL 


$ 



Effective 4/17/95, an out-of-print surcharge may apply to certain titles acquired by NTIS more than three years pnor to the 
current calendar year; please call to.verify price. 

International Airmail Fees 

Canada and Mexico add $4 per paper copy report; $1 per microfiche copy. Other countnes add $8 per paper copy report. 
$1 .25 per microfiche copy. (Paper copy reports and microfiche copies are shipped surface mail unless airmail is specified ) 



Prices arc subject to clunge 



M pm a > mniora 






BISNIS 



U.S. Department of Commerce 

International Trade Administration 

Room 7413 

Washington, D.C. 20230 

Telephone (202) 482-3100 • Facsimile (202) 482-2293 

INTERNET: BISNIS@DIGEX.NET 

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U.S. Department of Commerce Julv 1*^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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U.S. Department of Commerce July 1***H> 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



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U.S. Department of Commerce July 1 996 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



ft U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE:1996-415-149 



TO RECEIVE FUTURE EDITIONS OF THE DIRECTORY . COMPLETE THE FOLLOWING: 

NAME: 

TITLE: 

COMPANY: 

ADDRESS: 



CITY, STATE, ZIP: 



TO MAKE CHANGES, SUGGESTIONS, OR CORRECTIONS, PLEASE MAIL TO THE ADDRESS ON 
THE BACK OF THIS FORM. 

ADVISE AND CONSENT: 

The Defense Conversion Subcommittee (DCS) needs your advice on an important issue. Please take the time to read the following, 
answer the question and mail back to us. 

Release of the Russian Defense Business Directory (RDBD) Mailing List: 

From time-to-time the DCS receives formal inquiries for copies of the RDBD mailing list. If your name is included on the mailing 
list, please let us know whether your name may be disclose to FOIA requesters. The only basis for withholding your name is that \ou 
would not customarily disclose to the public that you may be working with the Department of Commerce on business development or 
outreach involving business development in Russia and are on the mailing list. 

_ I would customarily make this information public and authorize the release of my name and address; or 

_ I would not customarily make this information public. 



U.S. Department of Commerce .Uilv W^ 

RDBD 5 - St. Petersburg 



FROM: 



Franklin J. Carvalho 
Economic Analysis Division 
Room 1089, HCHB 
U.S. Department of Commerce 
14th & Constitution Ave, N.W. 
Washington, D.C. 20230 




ADDDDBlDBS^^t. 



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